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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TB282 and TB284, a widespread and a unique strain, respectively, identified in a previous study of tuberculosis transmission in central Los Angeles, California, USA.

We report here the genome sequences of two Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates previously identified in central Los Angeles, CA, in the 1990s using a PacBio platform. Isolate TB282 represents a large-cluster strain that caused 27% of the tuberculosis cases, while TB284 represents a strain that caused disease in only one patient. Copyright © 2017 Zhang and Yang.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis strain H87 isolated from an indoor water sample.

Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmentally acquired bacterium known to cause pulmonary and soft tissue infections, lymphadenitis, and disseminated disease in humans. We report here the complete genome sequence of strain H87, isolated from an indoor water sample, as a single circular chromosome of 5,626,623 bp with a G+C content of 68.8%. Copyright © 2017 Zhao et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii strains isolated from rhesus macaques.

Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium. It causes opportunistic infections with pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. We report here the complete genome sequences of two M. kansasii strains isolated from rhesus macaques. We performed genome comparisons with human and environmental isolates of M. kansasii to assess the genomic diversity of this species. Copyright © 2017 Panda et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. MS1601, a bacterium performing selective oxidation of polyols.

Corynebacterium sp. (ATCC 21245) is reclassified here as Mycobacterium sp. MS1601 based on 16S rRNA gene and complete-genome sequence analysis. It is able to oxidize branched polyols to corresponding hydroxycarboxylic acids. The total size of the genome sequence was 6,829,132 bp, including one circular chromosome of 6,407,860 bp. Copyright © 2017 Sayed et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a phthalic acid esters degrading Mycobacterium sp. YC-RL4

Mycobacterium sp. YC-RL4 is capable of utilizing a broad range of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) as sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The preliminary studies demonstrated its high degrading efficiency and good performance during the bioprocess with environmental samples. Here, we present the complete genome of Mycobacterium sp. YC-RL4, which consists of one circular chromosome (5,801,417 bp) and one plasmid (252,568 bp). The genomic analysis and gene annotation were performed and many potential genes responsible for the biodegradation of PAEs were identified from the genome. These results may advance the investigation of bioremediation of PAEs-contaminated environments by strain…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of three representative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing family strains belonging to distinct genotype clusters in Hanoi, Vietnam, during 2007 to 2009.

We present here three complete genome sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing family strains isolated in Hanoi, Vietnam. These three strains were selected from major genotypic clusters (15-MIRU-VNTR) identified in a previous population-based study. We emphasize their importance and potential as reference strains in this Asian region. Copyright © 2017 Wada et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain belonging to the East African-Indian family in the Indo-Oceanic lineage, isolated in Hanoi, Vietnam.

The East African-Indian (EAI) family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an endemic group mainly observed in Southeast Asia. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an M. tuberculosis strain isolated as a member of the EAI family in Hanoi, Vietnam, a country with a high incidence of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Wada et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Phenotypic and genomic comparison of Mycobacterium aurum and surrogate model species to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for drug discovery.

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and represents one of the major challenges facing drug discovery initiatives worldwide. The considerable rise in bacterial drug resistance in recent years has led to the need of new drugs and drug regimens. Model systems are regularly used to speed-up the drug discovery process and circumvent biosafety issues associated with manipulating M. tuberculosis. These include the use of strains such as Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium marinum that can be handled in biosafety level 2 facilities, making high-throughput screening feasible. However, each of these model species have their own limitations.We report and describe the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Updated reference genome sequence and annotation of Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97.

We report here an update to the reference genome sequence of the bovine tuberculosis bacillus Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97, generated using an integrative multiomics approach. The update includes 42 new coding sequences (CDSs), 14 modified annotations, 26 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) corrections, and disclosure that the RD900 locus, previously described as absent from the genome, is in fact present. Copyright © 2017 Malone et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Molecular and genomic features of Mycobacterium bovis strain 1595 isolated from Korean cattle.

The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular characteristics and to conduct a comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium (M.) bovis strain 1595 isolated from a native Korean cow. Molecular typing showed that M. bovis 1595 has spoligotype SB0140 with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing of 4-2-5-3-2-7-5-5-4-3-4-3-4-3, representing the most common type of M. bovis in Korea. The complete genome sequence of strain 1595 was determined by single-molecule real-time technology, which showed a genome of 4351712 bp in size with a 65.64% G + C content and 4358 protein-coding genes. Comparative genomic analysis with the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing-like strains revealed specific genetic variations associated with virulence and drug resistance.

Isolates of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage 2/East-Asian are considered one of the most successful strains due to their increased pathogenicity, hyper-virulence associated with drug resistance, and high transmission. Recent studies in Colombia have shown that the Beijing-like genotype is associated with multidrug-resistance and high prevalence in the southwest of the country, but the genetic basis of its success in dissemination is unknown. In contribution to this matter, we obtained the whole sequences of six genomes of clinical isolates assigned to the Beijing-like genotype. The genomes were compared with the reference genome of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and 53 previously published M.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium stephanolepidis.

Mycobacterium stephanolepidis is a rapid-growing nonpigmented species isolated from marine teleost fish (Stephanolepis cirrhifer) and is closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae Here, we report the complete sequence of its genome, comprising a 4.9-Mb chromosome. The sequence represents essential data for future phylogenetic and comparative genome studies of this fish pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Fukano et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera strain CDC2015-22-71.

Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterium species commonly found in the environment. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a strain from the investigation of invasive infections following open-heart surgeries that used contaminated LivaNova Sorin Stockert 3T heater-cooler devices. Copyright © 2017 Hasan et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Identifying and sequencing a Mycobacterium sp. strain F4 as a potential bioremediation agent for quinclorac.

Quinclorac is a widely used herbicide in rice filed. Unfortunately, quinclorac residues are phytotoxic to many crops/vegetables. The degradation of quinclorac in nature is very slow. On the other hand, degradation of quinclorac using bacteria can be an effective and efficient method to reduce its contamination. In this study, we isolated a quinclorac bioremediation bacterium strain F4 from quinclorac contaminated soils. Based on morphological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we identified strain F4 as Mycobacterium sp. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of F4 and determined…

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