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Authors: Wang, Bowen and Huang, Bingfen and Chen, Junmei and Li, Wenpeng and Yang, Ling and Yao, Lunguang and Niu, Qiuhong

Colonization resistance is an important attribute for bacterial interactions with hosts, but the mechanism is still not completely clear. In this study, we found that Phytobacter sp. SCO41T can effectively inhibit the in vivo colonization of Bacillus nematocida B16 in Caenorhabditis elegans, and we revealed the colonization resistance mechanism. Three strains of colonization-resistant bacteria, SCO41T, BX15, and BC7, were isolated from the intestines of the free-living nematode C. elegans derived from rotten fruit and soil. The primary characteristics and genome map of one of the three isolates was investigated to explore the underlying mechanism of colonization resistance in C. elegans. In addition, we performed exogenous iron supplementation and gene cluster knockout experiments to validate the sequencing results. The results showed that relationship was close among the three strains, which was identified as belonging to the genus Phytobacter. The type strain is SCO41T (=?CICC 24103T?=?KCTC 52362T). Whole genome analysis showed that csgA, csgB, csgC, csgE, csgF, and csgG were involved in the curli adhesive process and that fepA, fepB, fepC, fepD, and fepG played important roles in SCO41T against the colonization of B. nematocida B16 in C. elegans by competing for iron. Exogenous iron supplementation showed that exogenous iron can increase the colonization of B. nematocida B16, which was additionally confirmed by a deletion mutant strain. The csg gene family contributes to the colonization of SCO41T in C. elegans. Curli potentially contribute to the colonization of SCO41T in C. elegans, and enterobactin has a key role in SCO41T to resist the colonization of B. nematocida B16 by competing for iron.

Journal: Molecular biology reports
DOI: 10.1007/s11033-018-04574-w
Year: 2019

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