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Authors: Leung, Kenneth Siu-Sing and Siu, Gilman Kit-Hang and Tam, Kingsley King-Gee and To, Sabrina Wai-Chi and Rajwani, Rahim and Ho, Pak-Leung and Wong, Samson Sai-Yin and Zhao, Wei W and Ma, Oliver Chiu-Kit and Yam, Wing-Cheong

Background: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is posing a major threat to global TB control. In this study, we focused on two consecutive MDR-TB isolated from the same patient before and after the initiation of anti-TB treatment. To better understand the genomic characteristics of MDR-TB, Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing and comparative genomic analyses was performed to identify mutations that contributed to the stepwise development of drug resistance and growth fitness in MDR-TB underin vivochallenge of anti-TB drugs.Result:Both pre-treatment and post-treatment strain demonstrated concordant phenotypic and genotypic susceptibility profiles toward rifampicin, pyrazinamide, streptomycin, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, cycloserine, ethionamide, and para-aminosalicylic acid. However, although both strains carried identical missense mutations atrpoBS531L,inhAC-15T, andembBM306V, MYCOTB Sensititre assay showed that the post-treatment strain had 16-, 8-, and 4-fold elevation in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) toward rifabutin, isoniazid, and ethambutol respectively. The results have indicated the presence of additional resistant-related mutations governing the stepwise development of MDR-TB. Further comparative genomic analyses have identified three additional polymorphisms between the clinical isolates. These include a single nucleotide deletion at nucleotide position 360 ofrv0888in pre-treatment strain, and a missense mutation atrv3303c(lpdA)V44I and a 6-bp inframe deletion at codon 67-68 inrv2071c(cobM)in the post-treatment strain. Multiple sequence alignment showed that these mutations were occurring at highly conserved regions among pathogenic mycobacteria. Using structural-based and sequence-based algorithms, we further predicted that the mutations potentially have deleterious effect on protein function.Conclusion:This is the first study that compared the full genomes of two clonally-related MDR-TB clinical isolates during the course of anti-TB treatment. Our work has demonstrated the robustness of SMRT Sequencing in identifying mutations among MDR-TB clinical isolates. Comparative genome analysis also suggested novel mutations atrv0888, lpdA, andcobMthat might explain the difference in antibiotic resistance and growth pattern between the two MDR-TB strains.

Journal: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00478
Year: 2017

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