+

X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences’ rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Thursday, May 18, 2017

TB Study Finds Some Previously Reported Virulence Variants Were Sequencing Errors

A publication in BMC Genomics upends some of the conventional wisdom about variants that may cause virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Scientists at San Diego State University used SMRT Sequencing to produce a complete assembly of the pathogen, finding that earlier assemblies encountered problems due to GC bias and repetitive DNA. “SMRT genome assembly corrects reference errors, resolving the genetic basis of virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis” comes from Afif Elghraoui, Samuel Modlin, and Faramarz Valafar. The team used long-read PacBio sequencing on an attenuated strain of M. tuberculosis, which is often compared to a virulent strain to highlight sources of pathogenicity. The same strain was…

Read More »

Monday, May 1, 2017

SMRT Sequencing Enables Accurate Calling of Pathogenic Variants in Medically Relevant Genes

Screening for pathogenic variants associated with polycystic kidney disease is now more accurate and affordable with SMRT Sequencing. A new paper in Human Mutation from scientists at Leiden University Medical Center and other institutes reports the evaluation of long-read PacBio sequencing as a potential replacement for costly, time-consuming Sanger pipelines. “Detecting PKD1 variants in polycystic kidney disease patients by single-molecule long-read sequencing” comes from lead author Daniel Borràs, senior author Seyed Yahya Anvar, and collaborators. The team notes that previous efforts to get away from conventional tools by implementing short-read sequencing were never successful enough for clinical use. “A genetic diagnosis of…

Read More »

Friday, April 21, 2017

Review Paper Showcases Clinical Applications for SMRT Sequencing

Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Advanced Sciences published a compelling review article describing several recent clinically relevant projects they have completed using SMRT Sequencing. Released in the journal Human Cell, “Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area” comes from lead author Kazuma Nakano, senior author Takashi Hirano, and collaborators. The team adopted long-read PacBio sequencing as an alternative to short-read sequencers that missed too many important genomic elements. “PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of…

Read More »

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Crow Genome Analysis Combines Assemblies to Spot Tandem Arrays

[caption id="attachment_16661" align="alignright" width="300"] Photo by Jonn Leffmann[/caption] A new publication in Genome Research shows how the use of SMRT Sequencing, in combination with other technologies, can reveal far more about repetitive DNA and structural variants than short-read sequencing alone. In this paper, scientists compared genome assemblies produced with short reads, long reads, and optical maps to understand the performance of each approach. From Uppsala University, the University of Munich, and Bionano Genomics, the team studied the Eurasian crow for this project. The resulting paper, “Combination of short-read, long-read and optical mapping assemblies reveals large-scale tandem repeat arrays with population…

Read More »

Monday, March 27, 2017

Scientists Confirm Transplant-Associated Infection with SMRT Sequencing

[caption id="attachment_14022" align="alignright" width="300"] Image of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus courtesy of CDC/ Janice Haney Carr[/caption] A new PLoS One publication cites the use of SMRT Sequencing to clarify the transmission path of infection in a transplant recipient. This work is an excellent example of the clinical utility offered by long-read PacBio sequencing. The project was spurred by the frustrating inability to distinguish between hospital-acquired infections and donor-to-recipient infections through solid organ transplants. Scientists and clinicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Texas Medical School teamed up to apply advanced sequencing technologies in the case…

Read More »

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

New Goat Genome Assembly Breaks Continuity Record, Expands Breeding Tools

[caption id="attachment_14004" align="alignright" width="300"] Photo of San Clemente Island goat kids by Cliff, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons[/caption] Efforts to produce a reference-grade goat genome assembly for improved breeding programs have paid off. A new Nature Genetics publication reports a high-quality, highly contiguous assembly that can be used to develop genotyping tools for quick, reliable analysis of traits such as milk and meat quality or adaptation to harsh environments. The program also offers a look at how different scaffolding approaches perform with SMRT Sequencing data. “Single-molecule sequencing and chromatin conformation capture enable de novo reference assembly of the domestic goat genome” comes from…

Read More »

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

High-Quality, Chromosome-Scale Quinoa Genome Valuable for Breeding Better Crops

A new genome assembly has remarkable promise to boost the global food supply. Scientists from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and other institutions sequenced quinoa, a nutritious grain that can grow in marginal lands and other suboptimal environments. Their assembly offers new clues that could help improve breeding efforts to make the plant more accessible worldwide. “The genome of Chenopodium quinoa” was published recently in Nature by lead author David Jarvis, senior author Mark Tester, and a large group of collaborators. They focused on this plant, which is believed to have been domesticated more than 7,000 years ago in…

Read More »

Friday, March 3, 2017

‘Mobilome’ Study of Antibiotic Resistance Implicates Transposon Activity

[caption id="attachment_13900" align="alignright" width="300"] Klebsiella pneumoniae[/caption] A recent effort to understand the genetic mechanisms behind swappable elements of drug-resistance among bacteria built on previous studies of Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. The work was made possible by high-quality genome assemblies of these organisms generated earlier with SMRT Sequencing technology. In this project, scientists from the U.S., France, and Brazil teamed up to learn precisely how drug-resistance plasmids are spread from one species to another. They report the results of that investigation in mBio with the publication “Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids” from…

Read More »

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Scientists Explore Extremophile Genome with SMRT Sequencing

[caption id="attachment_13897" align="alignright" width="300"] Photo by Liam Quinn[/caption] A recent Nature publication from a large team of scientists in Europe, Canada, and the US reports the use of SMRT Sequencing to elucidate the genome of Fragilariopsis cylindrus, a single-celled eukaryotic diatom adapted to living in polar waters of the Antarctic Ocean. The work has implications for the biotechnology industry, which looks to extremophiles as a potential source of important enzymes. “Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus” comes from lead author Thomas Mock, senior author Igor Grigoriev, and many collaborators at the University of East Anglia, Earlham Institute, Joint…

Read More »

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Toward a Gold Standard for Human Structural Variation

Scientists from the University of Washington and McDonnell Genome Institute recently reported in Genome Research the results of an in-depth assessment of structural variation in the human genome using SMRT Sequencing technology. They found far more variation than expected and suggest using this approach to establish a comprehensive database of structural variants that would aid future studies. “Discovery and genotyping of structural variation from long-read haploid genome sequence data” comes from lead author John Huddleston, senior author Evan Eichler, and collaborators. The team fully sequenced two haploid human cell lines (CHM1 and CHM13) with SMRT Sequencing to greater than 60-fold…

Read More »

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Scientists Produce Reference Genome for Plasmodium, Update Phylogeny

A new Nature paper from scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other institutions delves into two Plasmodium genomes and reveals novel information about how these parasites have evolved. SMRT Sequencing was used to generate a reference genome and high-quality draft assembly for the organisms, providing a clear picture of species that have previously been difficult to characterize. From lead author Gavin Rutledge, senior author Thomas Otto, and collaborators, “Plasmodium malariae and P. ovale genomes provide insights into malaria parasite evolution” reports that prior studies have “been hampered by a lack of genetic information” for species responsible for many malaria infections. The scientists deployed…

Read More »

Monday, December 12, 2016

New Genome Assembly and Analysis of Grape Pathogen Elucidate Virulence Mechanisms

A new publication from scientists at the University of California, Davis, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service presents important findings about a fungus that threatens global grape production. As part of the project, the team used SMRT Sequencing to generate a new assembly of the fungal genome, resulting in a more complete assembly than a previous short-read attempt. “Condition-dependent co-regulation of genomic clusters of virulence factors in the grapevine trunk pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum,” published in Molecular Plant Pathology, comes from lead author Mélanie Massonnet, senior author Dario Cantu, and collaborators. The team was eager to determine why the wood-infecting Neofusicoccum…

Read More »

Monday, October 17, 2016

New FALCON Tools Enable Diploid Assemblies from SMRT Sequencing Data

In a Nature Methods paper released today, scientists describe the new bioinformatics tools to produce diploid genome assemblies from SMRT Sequencing reads. FALCON (Fast ALignment and CONsensus for assembly) and FALCON-Unzip were developed by PacBio scientists in collaboration with researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions. “Phased diploid genome assembly with single-molecule real-time sequencing” comes from lead authors Chen-Shan Chin and Paul Peluso, senior author Michael Schatz, and collaborators. In the publication, the team details how FALCON and FALCON-Unzip work and presents data from several validation studies of organisms including Arabidopsis,…

Read More »

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Diploid Assembly of Korean Genome Reveals Population-Specific Variation and Novel Sequence

In a paper published today in Nature, scientists from Seoul National University, Macrogen, and other institutions present the de novo genome assembly for a Korean individual. The effort used SMRT Sequencing and other technologies to generate the assembly, fully phase all chromosomes, and perform detailed analyses of structural variation and other elements. In the process, the team generated novel sequence data that helps fill gaps in the human reference genome and continues the trend of developing important new population-specific resources. The work, reported in “De novo assembly and phasing of a Korean human genome,” was contributed by lead authors Jeong-Sun…

Read More »

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Precision Medicine Review Highlights Need for Accuracy & Comprehensiveness in Genome Sequencing

Stanford’s Euan Ashley wrote a terrific review about the clinical use of genome sequencing for Nature Reviews Genetics. “Towards Precision Medicine” is well worth a read, covering topics from the ethnic background of the human reference genome to public interest in precision medicine.  He also covers technical angles such as mapping of sequence reads for variant calling across challenging regions of the genome with known clinical significance. Ashley’s premise is that many of the current standards in genomics — from sequencers to analysis tools and more — were developed for use in basic research, where the consequences of inaccurate information…

Read More »

1 2 3 6

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives