fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Monday, June 15, 2015

Scientists Publish New Methylation Analysis Protocols Using SMRT Sequencing

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Saskatchewan teamed up to develop an innovative approach to methylation analysis using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing. The resulting method was just published in BMC Genomics. Lead author Yao Yang and colleagues note in the paper [“Quantitative and multiplexed DNA methylation analysis using long-read single-molecule real-time bisulfite sequencing (SMRT-BS)”] that existing methods for methylation analysis are limited by cost and throughput in the case of Sanger sequencing, or short read lengths with NGS technologies. Their goal was to develop a method combining long reads, high accuracy,…

Read More »

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

In Assembler Evaluation, Scientists Recommend Non-hybrid Approach to Bacterial Genomes

A new publication in Nature Scientific Reports recommends using only the PacBio® system to sequence bacterial genomes for the best chance of generating an accurate and finished assembly. The paper, “Completing bacterial genome assemblies: strategy and performance comparisons,” reviews several different long-read assembly methods for bacterial genomes. Authors Yu-Chieh Liao, Shu-Hung Lin, and Hsin-Hung Lin from the Institute of Population Health Sciences in Taiwan note that while several methods exist, efforts to evaluate and compare them have been insufficient. They set out to thoroughly assess these methods, which include hybrid assembly protocols as well as long-read-only protocols. Long-read technology appealed…

Read More »

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

New MHAP Algorithm Delivers Fast, High-Quality Genome Assemblies

A new publication in Nature Biotechnology reports the development of a lightning-fast genome assembly pipeline optimized for long reads. Scientists from the University of Maryland and the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center created the MinHash Alignment Process, known as MHAP, to dramatically reduce assembly time and improve assembly quality. Their results are worth celebrating: assembly times were 600-fold faster compared to existing methods. “Using MHAP and the Celera Assembler, single-molecule sequencing can produce de novo near-complete eukaryotic assemblies that are 99.99% accurate when compared with available reference genomes,” the authors write. In the best cases, entire chromosome arms assembled…

Read More »

Thursday, April 30, 2015

In Study, Continuous Long Reads Outperform Synthetic Long Reads for Resolving Tandem Repeats

Scientists from Argentina and Brazil published the results of a study comparing long-read approaches to characterize the genome structure of a highly complex region of the Y chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster. They found that Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing outperformed synthetic long reads in accurately representing tandem repeats. The study aimed to resolve the structure of the autosomal gene Mst77F, which had previously been found to have multiple tandem copies; the region, however, was known to be grossly misassembled in the reference. The scientists, from Centro Internacional Franco Argentino de Ciencias de la Información y de Sistemas and Universidade Federal…

Read More »

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

In Genome-wide Study, Long Reads Prove Critical for Structural Variant Discovery

In a paper just published in BMC Genomics, a team of scientists led by Baylor’s Human Genome Sequencing Center reports a thorough analysis of structural variation in a personal genome. What makes this study special is the large number of different technologies applied and the sheer volume of data gathered and analyzed for this single genome. The paper also includes the first known analysis of structural variation in a diploid human genome using SMRT® Sequencing, with 10x coverage from PacBio® long reads. Lead authors Adam English and William Salerno and their collaborators at a number of institutions describe the results…

Read More »

Thursday, March 26, 2015

In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study, SMRT Sequencing Detects Resistance Mutations Early, New Splice Isoforms and More

Scientists from Uppsala University report in a recent paper that using the Iso-Seq™ method with SMRT® Sequencing allowed them to detect and monitor mutations in the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Screening mutations in this region is important for determining the point at which these patients become resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapies, and is currently performed in the clinic using Sanger sequencing, quantitative RT-PCR, and other assays. The paper, “Clonal distribution of BCR-ABL1 mutations and splice isoforms by single-molecule long-read RNA sequencing,” was published last month in BMC Cancer from lead author Lucia…

Read More »

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Review Article: Long-Read Sequencing Offers Better Understanding of Pluripotency

A new review article offers a nice overview of attempts to characterize the transcriptome of human stem cells using RNA-seq, the Iso-Seq™ method, and more. Kin Fai Au and Vittorio Sebastiano, scientists at the University of Iowa and Stanford University, respectively, contributed the review to Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. “The introduction of the RNA-Seq technology based on [second-generation sequencing technology] has provided a remarkable step forward providing a fast and inexpensive way to determine the transcriptome of a given cell type and several remarkable works have been done using this type of approach,” Au and Sebastiano write. “Nonetheless…

Read More »

Thursday, December 4, 2014

A New Reference Genome for Shigella: SMRT Sequencing of a Historic Sample

In a special issue of The Lancet dedicated to World War I, an article by scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute used Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing to decode the genome of the first isolate ever collected of Shigella flexneri. The bacterium, a descendant of E. coli and first identified as a separate strain in 1902, was responsible for severe dysentery among World War I troops due to poor hygienic conditions in the trenches. Today, S. flexneri is one of the leading causes of diarrheal death among children in developing countries and other areas of poor sanitation. Hoping to…

Read More »

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

New Transcript Study Offers Clues to Pathogenesis of Repeat Disorders Linked to FMR1

It’s been nearly two years since a team of scientists from the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine published the first-ever complete sequence of FMR1, the gene associated with a repeat expansion that causes Fragile X syndrome. That team is once again breaking new ground, this time characterizing alternative splicing and full-length transcripts of FMR1. For both studies, the scientists relied on Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing because its uniquely long reads allowed them to span the gene and generate sequence and isoform data that would not have been possible any other way. The new paper, “Differential increases of…

Read More »

Monday, November 10, 2014

Nature Paper Offers Novel Sequence, Structural Variant Data for a More Complete Human Genome

A new paper out in Nature extends our view into the human genome and challenges current ideas about genetic variation. “Resolving the complexity of the human genome using single-molecule sequencing” comes from first author Mark Chaisson, senior author Evan Eichler, and their collaborators at the University of Washington, University of Bari Aldo Moro, and University of Pittsburgh. In the paper, the scientists describe an important effort to fill gaps and better characterize structural variation in the human genome by using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing data. The team sequenced a haploid human genome, using a hydatidiform mole cell line (CHM1),…

Read More »

Thursday, October 9, 2014

New Brain Study Reveals Higher Molecular Diversity from Alternative Splicing

A new paper from scientists in Switzerland and the US adds to recent findings about diversity of neuronal transcripts in the mammalian brain. The authors report that this study was only possible using long reads from Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing. “Targeted Combinatorial Alternative Splicing Generates Brain Region-Specific Repertoires of Neurexins,” from lead author Dietmar Schreiner, senior author Peter Scheiffele, and collaborators, was published this month in the journal Neuron. The researchers are from the University of Basel, ETH Zurich, and North Carolina State University. This is the second study on neurexin mRNA diversity using PacBio® sequencing. The team tackled…

Read More »

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

New Papers Detail Complexity of Methylome-Related Virulence in Human Pathogens

In two new publications, one published today, scientists from Australia, Italy, the UK, and the US report critical and surprising new findings about DNA methylation-related complexity of bacteria. Adding to the list of advances from genome-wide epigenetic analysis, these projects enhance our understanding of how methylation systems work in human pathogens — and offer important clues for future investigations into how to treat them. Today’s paper, “A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes,” was published in Nature Communications by scientists at the University of Leicester, University of Siena, University of Adelaide, and Griffith University. Senior authors…

Read More »

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Science Perspective: “Tracking Antibiotic Resistance”

In the current issue of Science there is an interesting Perspective by Scott Beatson and Mark Walker of the University of Queensland discussing research published this week in Science Translational Medicine by Conlan et al. who used SMRT® Sequencing to track plasmid diversity of hospital-associated infectious bacteria at the NIH Clinical Center. The article provides a nice overview of the paper, including an explanation of the important role that plasmids play in spreading antibiotic resistance. They illustrate why short-read DNA sequencing technologies are insufficient in resolving them and long reads are necessary for this work. “Plasmids may be viewed as…

Read More »

Monday, September 22, 2014

Maryland Scientists Produce High-Quality, Cost-Effective Genome Assembly of Loa loa Roundworm Using SMRT Sequencing

A paper just released in BMC Genomics details what authors call “the most complete filarial nematode assembly published thus far at a fraction of the cost of previous efforts.” The project was performed using the PacBio® RS II DNA Sequencing System by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Institute for Genome Sciences and the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In this genome sequencing effort, scientists generated a de novo assembly of Loa loa, a roundworm that infects humans. L. loa, transmitted to humans by deer flies, causes loiasis. The…

Read More »

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

NIH Study: Finished Genomes Provide Actionable Data to Combat Spread of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

A study launched over concerns around hospital-acquired infections has led to a recommendation for better microbial screening of patients upon admission. The research, from scientists at several NIH institutes, found that cases of hospital-acquired infection were less common than cases where patients were likely already colonized but received false negative results from basic screening. The study was made possible by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing, which allowed researchers to sequence plasmids and analyze their diversity and likely phylogeny. Short-read sequencing and strain-typing technologies could not provide the information necessary for a comprehensive analysis. “Single-molecule sequencing to track plasmid diversity of…

Read More »

1 2 3 4 5 6

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives

Search

Categories