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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence and analysis of Peptoclostridium difficile strain ZJCDC-S82.

Peptoclostridium difficile (Clostridium difficile) is the major pathogen associated with infectious diarrhea in humans. Concomitant with the increased incidence of C. difficile infection worldwide, there is an increasing concern regarding this infection type. This study reports a draft assembly and detailed sequence analysis of C. difficile strain ZJCDC-S82. The de novo assembled genome was 4.19 Mb in size, which includes 4,013 protein-coding genes, 41 rRNA genes, and 84 tRNA genes. Along with the nuclear genome, we also assembled sequencing information for a single plasmid consisting of 11,930 nucleotides. Comparative genomic analysis of C. difficile ZJCDC-S82 and two other previously published…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Co-infection and emergence of rifamycin resistance during a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

Clostridium difficile (Peptoclostridium difficile) is a common health care associated infection with a disproportionately high incidence in elderly patients. Disease symptoms range from mild diarrhoea through to life threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Around 20% of patients may suffer recurrent disease which often requires re-hospitalisation of patients.C. difficile was isolated from stool samples from a patient with two recurrent C. difficile infections. PCR-ribotyping, whole genome sequencing and phenotypic assays were used to characterise these isolates.Genotypic and phenotypic screening of C. difficile isolates revealed multiple PCR-ribotypes present, and the emergence of rifamycin resistance during the infection cycle.Understanding both the clinical and bacterial factors…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The challenge of analyzing the sugarcane genome.

Reference genome sequences have become key platforms for genetics and breeding of the major crop species. Sugarcane is probably the largest crop produced in the world (in weight of crop harvested) but lacks a reference genome sequence. Sugarcane has one of the most complex genomes in crop plants due to the extreme level of polyploidy. The genome of modern sugarcane hybrids includes sub-genomes from two progenitors Saccharum officinarum and S. spontaneum with some chromosomes resulting from recombination between these sub-genomes. Advancing DNA sequencing technologies and strategies for genome assembly are making the sugarcane genome more tractable. Advances in long read…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Modular traits of the Rhizobiales root microbiota and their evolutionary relationship with symbiotic Rhizobia.

Rhizobia are a paraphyletic group of soil-borne bacteria that induce nodule organogenesis in legume roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen for plant growth. In non-leguminous plants, species from the Rhizobiales order define a core lineage of the plant microbiota, suggesting additional functional interactions with plant hosts. In this work, genome analyses of 1,314 Rhizobiales isolates along with amplicon studies of the root microbiota reveal the evolutionary history of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in this bacterial order. Key symbiosis genes were acquired multiple times, and the most recent common ancestor could colonize roots of a broad host range. In addition, root growth promotion is…

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