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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative analysis of core genome MLST and SNP typing within a European Salmonella serovar Enteritidis outbreak.

Multi-country outbreaks of foodborne bacterial disease present challenges in their detection, tracking, and notification. As food is increasingly distributed across borders, such outbreaks are becoming more common. This increases the need for high-resolution, accessible, and replicable isolate typing schemes. Here we evaluate a core genome multilocus typing (cgMLST) scheme for the high-resolution reproducible typing of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) isolates, by its application to a large European outbreak of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. This outbreak had been extensively characterised using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based approaches. The cgMLST analysis was congruent with the original SNP-based analysis, the epidemiological data, and whole…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First description of novel arginine catabolic mobile elements (ACMEs) types IV and V harboring a kdp operon in Staphylococcus epidermidis characterized by whole genome sequencing.

The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) was first described in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain USA300 and is thought to facilitate survival on skin. To date three distinct ACME types have been characterized comprehensively in S. aureus and/or Staphylococcus epidermidis. Type I harbors the arc and opp3 operons encoding an arginine deaminase pathway and an oligopeptide permease ABC transporter, respectively, type II harbors the arc operon only, and type III harbors the opp3 operon only. To investigate the diversity and detailed genetic organization of ACME, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on 32 ACME-harboring oro-nasal S. epidermidis isolates using MiSeq-…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Moving forward: recent developments for the ferret biomedical research model.

Since the initial report in 1911, the domestic ferret has become an invaluable biomedical research model. While widely recognized for its utility in influenza virus research, ferrets are used for a variety of infectious and noninfectious disease models due to the anatomical, metabolic, and physiological features they share with humans and their susceptibility to many human pathogens. However, there are limitations to the model that must be overcome for maximal utility for the scientific community. Here, we describe important recent advances that will accelerate biomedical research with this animal model. Copyright © 2018 Albrecht et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of industrial biocontrol strain Paenibacillus polymyxa HY96-2 and further analysis of Its biocontrol mechanism.

Paenibacillus polymyxa (formerly known as Bacillus polymyxa) has been extensively studied for agricultural applications as a plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium and is also an important biocontrol agent. Our team has developed the P. polymyxa strain HY96-2 from the tomato rhizosphere as the first microbial biopesticide based on P. polymyxa for controlling plant diseases around the world, leading to the commercialization of this microbial biopesticide in China. However, further research is essential for understanding its precise biocontrol mechanisms. In this paper, we report the complete genome sequence of HY96-2 and the results of a comparative genomic analysis between different P. polymyxa strains. The…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

BMScan: using whole genome similarity to rapidly and accurately identify bacterial meningitis causing species.

Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection that remains a public health concern. Bacterial meningitis is commonly caused by the following species: Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. Here, we describe BMScan (Bacterial Meningitis Scan), a whole-genome analysis tool for the species identification of bacterial meningitis-causing and closely-related pathogens, an essential step for case management and disease surveillance. BMScan relies on a reference collection that contains genomes for 17 focal species to scan against to identify a given species. We established this reference collection by supplementing publically available genomes from RefSeq with genomes from the isolate…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis shows a closed pan-genome and multiple barriers to horizontal gene transfer.

Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are commensal bacteria on human skin. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a unique CoNS which produces various virulence factors and may, like S. aureus, cause severe infections, particularly in hospital settings. Unlike other staphylococci, it remains highly susceptible to antimicrobials, and genome-based phylogenetic studies have evidenced a highly conserved genome that distinguishes it from all other staphylococci.We demonstrate that S. lugdunensis possesses a closed pan-genome with a very limited number of new genes, in contrast to other staphylococci that have an open pan-genome. Whole-genome nucleotide and amino acid identity levels are also higher than in other staphylococci. We…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of soil actinobacteria Streptomyces cavourensis TJ430.

A new actinobacteria Streptomyces cavourensis TJ430 was isolated from the mountain soil collected from the southwest of China. In previous study, TJ430 showed striking bactericidal activities and strong ability of antibiotic production. Here, we report complete genome of this bacterium, consisting of 7.6?Mb linear chromosome and 0.2?Mb plasmids. It was predicted 6450 genes in chromosome and 225 genes in plasmids, as well as 12 gene islands in chromosome. Abundant genes have predicted functions in antibiotic metabolism and stress resistance. A whole-genome comparison of S. cavourensis TJ430, S. coelicolor A3(2), and S. lividans 66 indicates that TJ430 has a relatively high…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Lifestyle of Lactobacillus hordei isolated from water kefir based on genomic, proteomic and physiological characterization.

Water kefir is a traditional fermented beverage made from sucrose, water, kefir granules, dried or fresh fruits. In our water kefir granules, Lactobacillus (L.) hordei is one of the predominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species of this presumed symbiotic consortium. It faces abundant sucrose versus limitation of amino- and fatty acids in an acidic environment. Sequencing of the genome of L. hordei TMW 1.1822 revealed one chromosome plus three plasmids. The size of the chromosome was 2.42?Mbp with a GC content of 35% GC and 2461 predicted coding sequences. Furthermore, we identified 1474 proteins upon growth on water kefir medium.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome analysis of Vallitalea guaymasensis strain L81 isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system.

Abyssivirga alkaniphila strain L81T, recently isolated from a black smoker biofilm at the Loki’s Castle hydrothermal vent field, was previously described as a mesophilic, obligately anaerobic heterotroph able to ferment carbohydrates, peptides, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The strain was classified as a new genus within the family Lachnospiraceae. Herein, its genome is analyzed and A. alkaniphila is reassigned to the genus Vallitalea as a new strain of V. guaymasensis, designated V. guaymasensis strain L81. The 6.4 Mbp genome contained 5651 protein encoding genes, whereof 4043 were given a functional prediction. Pathways for fermentation of mono-saccharides, di-saccharides, peptides, and amino acids were…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Deciphering mixotrophic Clostridium formicoaceticum metabolism and energy conservation: Genomic analysis and experimental studies.

Clostridium formicoaceticum, a Gram-negative mixotrophic homoacetogen, produces acetic acid as the sole metabolic product from various carbon sources, including fructose, glycerol, formate, and CO2. Its genome of 4.59-Mbp contains a highly conserved Wood-Ljungdahl pathway gene cluster with the same layout as that in other mixotrophic acetogens, including Clostridium aceticum, Clostridium carboxidivorans, and Clostridium ljungdahlii. For energy conservation, C. formicoaceticum does not have all the genes required for the synthesis of cytochrome or quinone used for generating proton gradient in H+-dependent acetogens such as Moorella thermoacetica; instead, it has the Rnf system and a Na+-translocating ATPase similar to the one in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 isolated from healthy Korean human feces

The genus of Olsenella has been isolated from vertebrate animal mouth, rumen, and feces. Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was isolated from fecal samples obtained from a healthy Korean. The whole-genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was analyzed using the PacBio Sequel platform. The genome comprises a 2,108,034 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 65.50%, 1,838 total genes, 13 rRNA genes, and 52 tRNA genes. Also, we found that strain KGMB 04489 had some genes for hydrolysis enzymes, and antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance in its genome based on the result of genome analysis.

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