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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic insights into Campylobacter jejuni virulence and population genetics

Campylobacter jejuni has long been recognized as a main food-borne pathogen in many parts of the world. Natural reservoirs include a wide variety of domestic and wild birds and mammals, whose intestines offer a suitable biological niche for the survival and dissemination of the organism. Understanding the genetic basis of the biology and pathogenicity of C. jejuni is vital to prevent and control Campylobacter-associated infections. The recent progress in sequencing techniques has allowed for a rapid increase in our knowledge of the molecular biology and the genetic structures of Campylobacter. Single-molecule realtime (SMRT) sequencing, which goes beyond four-base sequencing, revealed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Listeria monocytogenes in stone fruits linked to a multistate outbreak: enumeration of cells and whole-genome sequencing.

In 2014, the identification of stone fruits contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes led to the subsequent identification of a multistate outbreak. Simultaneous detection and enumeration of L. monocytogenes were performed on 105 fruits, each weighing 127 to 145 g, collected from 7 contaminated lots. The results showed that 53.3% of the fruits yielded L. monocytogenes (lower limit of detection, 5 CFU/fruit), and the levels ranged from 5 to 2,850 CFU/fruit, with a geometric mean of 11.3 CFU/fruit (0.1 CFU/g of fruit). Two serotypes, IVb-v1 and 1/2b, were identified by a combination of PCR- and antiserum-based serotyping among isolates from fruits and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Use of single molecule sequencing for comparative genomics of an environmental and a clinical isolate of Clostridium difficile ribotype 078.

How the pathogen Clostridium difficile might survive, evolve and be transferred between reservoirs within the natural environment is poorly understood. Some ribotypes are found both in clinical and environmental settings. Whether these strains are distinct from each another and evolve in the specific environments is not established. The possession of a highly mobile genome has contributed to the genetic diversity and ongoing evolution of C. difficile. Interpretations of genetic diversity have been limited by fragmented assemblies resulting from short-read length sequencing approaches and by a limited understanding of epigenetic regulation of diversity. To address this, single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the freshwater bacterium Beggiatoa leptomitoformis strain D-401.

Here, we report the complete closed genome sequence and methylome analysis of Beggiatoa leptomitoformis strain D-401 (DSM 14945, UNIQEMU 779), which is quite different from the previously described Beggiatoa leptomitoformis neotype strain D-402T (DSM 14946, UNIQEM U 779) with regard to morphology and lithotrophic growth in the presence of thiosulfate. Copyright © 2018 Fomenkov et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis shows a closed pan-genome and multiple barriers to horizontal gene transfer.

Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are commensal bacteria on human skin. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a unique CoNS which produces various virulence factors and may, like S. aureus, cause severe infections, particularly in hospital settings. Unlike other staphylococci, it remains highly susceptible to antimicrobials, and genome-based phylogenetic studies have evidenced a highly conserved genome that distinguishes it from all other staphylococci.We demonstrate that S. lugdunensis possesses a closed pan-genome with a very limited number of new genes, in contrast to other staphylococci that have an open pan-genome. Whole-genome nucleotide and amino acid identity levels are also higher than in other staphylococci. We…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis SLPE1-3, a novel lactic acid bacterium causing postharvest decay of the mushroom Pleurotus eryngii

Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis is a pathogenic bacterium causing postharvest decay of the cultivated mushroom Pleurotus eryngii, whose pathogenic mechanism is little known. Sequencing of its complete genome is a prerequisite for revealing the molecular mechanism of infection. In this research, the complete genome of SLPE1-3 was obtained using the Single Molecular Real Time (SMRT) sequencing strategy. The genome was analyzed both structurally and functionally. The complete genome of SLPE1-3 consists of a single, circular chromosome (2,522,493 bp; 34.91% GC content) without any plasmid. The results showed the feasibility and superiority of SMRT in bacterial complete-genome research. The genome of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of two Rhodobacter strains.

We report the complete genome sequences of two strains of the Alphaproteobacteria genus Rhodobacter, Rhodobacter blasticus 28/5, the source of the commercially available enzyme RsaI, and a new isolate of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. Both strains contain multiple restriction-modification systems, and their DNA methylation motifs are included in this report.

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