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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Adaptations of Alteromonas sp. 76-1 to Polysaccharide Degradation: A CAZyme Plasmid for Ulvan Degradation and Two Alginolytic Systems.

Studying the physiology and genomics of cultured hydrolytic bacteria is a valuable approach to decipher the biogeochemical cycling of marine polysaccharides, major nutrients derived from phytoplankton and macroalgae. We herein describe the profound potential of Alteromonas sp. 76-1, isolated from alginate-enriched seawater at the Patagonian continental shelf, to degrade the algal polysaccharides alginate and ulvan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that strain 76-1 might represent a novel species, distinguished from its closest relative (Alteromonas naphthalenivorans) by adaptations to their contrasting habitats (productive open ocean vs. coastal sediments). Ecological distinction of 76-1 was particularly manifested in the abundance of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), consistent…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Anaerobic Degradation of Sulfated Polysaccharides by Two Novel Kiritimatiellales Strains Isolated From Black Sea Sediment.

The marine environment contains a large diversity of sulfated polysaccharides and other glycopolymers. Saccharolytic microorganisms degrade these compounds through hydrolysis, which includes the hydrolysis of sulfate groups from sugars by sulfatases. Various marine bacteria of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydia (PVC) superphylum have exceptionally high numbers of sulfatase genes associated with the degradation of sulfated polysaccharides. However, thus far no sulfatase-rich marine anaerobes are known. In this study, we aimed to isolate marine anaerobes using sulfated polysaccharides as substrate. Anoxic enrichment cultures were set up with a mineral brackish marine medium, inoculated with anoxic Black Sea sediment sampled at 2,100 m water depth…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Long-read based de novo assembly of low-complexity metagenome samples results in finished genomes and reveals insights into strain diversity and an active phage system.

Complete and contiguous genome assemblies greatly improve the quality of subsequent systems-wide functional profiling studies and the ability to gain novel biological insights. While a de novo genome assembly of an isolated bacterial strain is in most cases straightforward, more informative data about co-existing bacteria as well as synergistic and antagonistic effects can be obtained from a direct analysis of microbial communities. However, the complexity of metagenomic samples represents a major challenge. While third generation sequencing technologies have been suggested to enable finished metagenome-assembled genomes, to our knowledge, the complete genome assembly of all dominant strains in a microbiome sample…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome sequence and transcriptomic profiles of a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas agarivorans Hao 2018.

Members of the marine genus Pseudoalteromonas have attracted great interest because of their ability to produce a large number of biologically active substances. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas agarivorans Hao 2018, a strain isolated from an abalone breeding environment, using second-generation Illumina and third-generation PacBio sequencing technologies. Illumina sequencing offers high quality and short reads, while PacBio technology generates long reads. The scaffolds of the two platforms were assembled to yield a complete genome sequence that included two circular chromosomes and one circular plasmid. Transcriptomic data for Pseudoalteromonas were not available. We therefore collected comprehensive RNA-seq…

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