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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic recombination leading to decreased virulence of group B Streptococcus in a mouse model of adult invasive disease.

Adult invasive disease caused by Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasing worldwide. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) now permits rapid identification of recombination events, a phenomenon that occurs frequently in GBS. Using WGS, we described that strain NGBS375, a capsular serotype V GBS isolate of sequence type (ST)297, has an ST1 genomic background but has acquired approximately 300 kbp of genetic material likely from an ST17 strain. Here, we examined the virulence of this strain in an in vivo model of GBS adult invasive infection. The mosaic ST297 strain showed intermediate virulence, causing significantly less systemic infection and reduced mortality than a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed pathogenic potential in Penicillium capsulatum as a novel fungal pathogen belonging to Eurotiales.

Penicillium capsulatum is a rare Penicillium species used in paper manufacturing, but recently it has been reported to cause invasive infection. To research the pathogenicity of the clinical Penicillium strain, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of the clinical and environmental strains of P. capsulatum. Comparative analyses of these two P. capsulatum strains and close related strains belonging to Eurotiales were performed. The assembled genome sizes of P. capsulatum are approximately 34.4 Mbp in length and encode 11,080 predicted genes. The different isolates of P. capsulatum are highly similar, with the exception of several unique genes, INDELs or SNPs in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Edwardsiella piscicida isolate S11-285 recovered from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) in Mississippi, USA.

Edwardsiella piscicida is a recently described Gram-negative facultative anaerobe and an important pathogen to many wild and cultured fish species worldwide. Here, we report the complete and annotated genome of E. piscicida isolate S11-285 recovered from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), consisting of a chromosome of 3,923,603 bp and 1 plasmid. Copyright © 2016 Reichley et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole genome analysis of Yersinia ruckeri isolated over 27 years in Australia and New Zealand reveals geographical endemism over multiple lineages and recent evolution under host selection.

Yersinia ruckeri is a salmonid pathogen with widespread distribution in cool-temperate waters including Australia and New Zealand, two isolated environments with recently developed salmonid farming industries. Phylogenetic comparison of 58 isolates from Australia, New Zealand, USA, Chile, Finland and China based on non-recombinant core genome SNPs revealed multiple deep-branching lineages, with a most recent common ancestor estimated at 18?500 years BP (12?355-24?757 95% HPD) and evidence of Australasian endemism. Evolution within the Tasmanian Atlantic salmon serotype O1b lineage has been slow, with 63 SNPs describing the variance over 27 years. Isolates from the prevailing lineage are poorly/non-motile compared to a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of phylotype I strain EP1 reveals substantial divergence from other strains in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

Ralstonia solanacearum species complex is a devastating group of phytopathogens with an unusually wide host range and broad geographical distribution. R. solanacearum isolates may differ considerably in various properties including host range and pathogenicity, but the underlying genetic bases remain vague. Here, we conducted the genome sequencing of strain EP1 isolated from Guangdong Province of China, which belongs to phylotype I and is highly virulent to a range of solanaceous crops. Its complete genome contains a 3.95-Mb chromosome and a 2.05-Mb mega-plasmid, which is considerably bigger than reported genomes of other R. solanacearum strains. Both the chromosome and the mega-plasmid…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo mutations resolve disease transmission pathways in clonal malaria

Detecting de novo mutations in viral and bacterial pathogens enables researchers to reconstruct detailed networks of disease transmission and is a key technique in genomic epidemiology. However, these techniques have not yet been applied to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in which a larger genome, slower generation times, and a complex life cycle make them difficult to implement. Here, we demonstrate the viability of de novo mutation studies in P. falciparum for the first time. Using a combination of sequencing, library preparation, and genotyping methods that have been optimized for accuracy in low-complexity genomic regions, we have detected de novo…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genomic and transcriptional landscape analysis using third-generation sequencing: a case study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D.

Completion of eukaryal genomes can be difficult task with the highly repetitive sequences along the chromosomes and short read lengths of second-generation sequencing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK113-7D, widely used as a model organism and a cell factory, was selected for this study to demonstrate the superior capability of very long sequence reads for de novo genome assembly. We generated long reads using two common third-generation sequencing technologies (Oxford Nanopore Technology (ONT) and Pacific Biosciences (PacBio)) and used short reads obtained using Illumina sequencing for error correction. Assembly of the reads derived from all three technologies resulted in complete sequences for…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces formicae KY5, the formicamycin producer.

Here we report the complete genome of the new species Streptomyces formicae KY5 isolated from Tetraponera fungus growing ants. S. formicae was sequenced using the PacBio and 454 platforms to generate a single linear chromosome with terminal inverted repeats. Illumina MiSeq sequencing was used to correct base changes resulting from the high error rate associated with PacBio. The genome is 9.6 Mbps, has a GC content of 71.38% and contains 8162 protein coding sequences. Predictive analysis shows this strain encodes at least 45 gene clusters for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, including a type 2 polyketide synthase encoding cluster for…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Completed genome sequences of strains from 36 serotypes of Salmonella.

We report here the completed closed genome sequences of strains representing 36 serotypes of Salmonella. These genome sequences will provide useful references for understanding the genetic variation between serotypes, particularly as references for mapping of raw reads or to create assemblies of higher quality, as well as to aid in studies of comparative genomics of Salmonella.© Crown copyright 2018.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Oryza meridionalis NQ Ng

Oryza meridionalis is an AA genome species found in Northern Australia. Phylogenetic analysis places this as the most distant of the AA genome species from domesticated rice (Oryza sativa). This makes it a key genetic resource for rice improvement. A draft nuclear genome sequence is available, and also the chloroplast genome has been sequenced from many genotypes. The high amylose starch content in these taxa may be useful for developing new rice grain characteristics. Here we have reviewed the all the research advancements that are made till today on this species.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome of Halomonas aestuarii Hb3, isolated from tidal flat

Halomonas aestuarii Hb3, a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria, was isolated from a tidal flat. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of its strain Hb3. Its size is estimated at 3.54Mbp with a mean G+C content of 67.9%. The genome includes 3238 open reading frames, 65 transfer RNAs, and four ribosomal RNA gene operons. Genes related to the degradation of monoaromatic compounds, detoxification of arsenic, and production of polymers were identified. These features indicate that this strain may be important for ecological and industrial application.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Satellite DNA evolution: old ideas, new approaches.

A substantial portion of the genomes of most multicellular eukaryotes consists of large arrays of tandemly repeated sequence, collectively called satellite DNA. The processes generating and maintaining different satellite DNA abundances across lineages are important to understand as satellites have been linked to chromosome mis-segregation, disease phenotypes, and reproductive isolation between species. While much theory has been developed to describe satellite evolution, empirical tests of these models have fallen short because of the challenges in assessing satellite repeat regions of the genome. Advances in computational tools and sequencing technologies now enable identification and quantification of satellite sequences genome-wide. Here, we…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The draft genome of the lichen-forming fungus Lasallia hispanica (Frey) Sancho & A. Crespo

Lasallia hispanica (Frey) Sancho & A. Crespo is one of three Lasallia species occurring in central-western Europe. It is an orophytic, photophilous Mediterranean endemic which is sympatric with the closely related, widely distributed, highly clonal sister taxon L. pustulata in the supra- and oro-Mediterranean belts. We sequenced the genome of L. hispanica from a multispore isolate. The total genome length is 41·2 Mb, including 8488 gene models. We present the annotation of a variety of genes that are involved in protein secretion, mating processes and secondary metabolism, and we report transposable elements. Additionally, we compared the genome of L. hispanica…

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