fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequencing reveals the origin of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica.

Polyploidy is an example of instantaneous speciation when it involves the formation of a new cytotype that is incompatible with the parental species. Because new polyploid individuals are likely to be rare, establishment of a new species is unlikely unless polyploids are able to reproduce through self-fertilization (selfing), or asexually. Conversely, selfing (or asexuality) makes it possible for polyploid species to originate from a single individual-a bona fide speciation event. The extent to which this happens is not known. Here, we consider the origin of Arabidopsis suecica, a selfing allopolyploid between Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa, which has hitherto been…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Adaptation of surface-associated bacteria to the open ocean: A genomically distinct subpopulation of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis Ccolonizes Pacific mesozooplankton.

The marine Roseobacter group encompasses numerous species which occupy a large variety of ecological niches. However, members of the genus Phaeobacter are specifically adapted to a surface-associated lifestyle and have so far been found nearly exclusively in disjunct, man-made environments including shellfish and fish aquacultures, as well as harbors. Therefore, the possible natural habitats, dispersal and evolution of Phaeobacter spp. have largely remained obscure. Applying a high-throughput cultivation strategy along a longitudinal Pacific transect, the present study revealed for the first time a widespread natural occurrence of Phaeobacter in the marine pelagial. These bacteria were found to be specifically associated…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

The unusual S locus of Leavenworthia is composed of two sets of paralogous loci.

The Leavenworthia self-incompatibility locus (S locus) consists of paralogs (Lal2, SCRL) of the canonical Brassicaceae S locus genes (SRK, SCR), and is situated in a genomic position that differs from the ancestral one in the Brassicaceae. Unexpectedly, in a small number of Leavenworthia alabamica plants examined, sequences closely resembling exon 1 of SRK have been found, but the function of these has remained unclear. BAC cloning and expression analyses were employed to characterize these SRK-like sequences. An SRK-positive Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clone was found to contain complete SRK and SCR sequences located close by one another in the derived genomic…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence analysis of Pandoraea pnomenusa type strain DSM 16536(T) isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient.

The genus of Pandoraea was first proposed in 2000 following the isolation from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients (Coenye et al., 2000). Five species were initially assigned to the novel genus namely Pandoraea apista, Pandoraea pulmonicola, Pandoraea pnomenusa, Pandoraea sputorum, and Pandoraea norimbergensis but the description of four new species and another four genomospecies in the subsequent years led to a total of nine species and four genomospecies within the genus of Pandoraea (Daneshvar et al., 2001; Anandham et al., 2010; Sahin et al., 2011). The isolation of Pandoraea spp. from various environmental samples such as water, sludge, and…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent site.

Members of the genus Geobacillus have been isolated from a wide variety of habitats worldwide and are the subject for targeted enzyme utilization in various industrial applications. Here we report the isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic starch-degrading Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1. The strain 12AMOR1 was isolated from deep-sea hot sediment at the Jan Mayen hydrothermal Vent Site. Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 consists of a 3,410,035 bp circular chromosome and a 32,689 bp plasmid with a G?+?C content of 52 % and 47 %, respectively. The genome comprises 3323 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNA species and 10 rRNA operons. The isolate…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials.

The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pathogenesis of multi drug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis as a determinant of future treatment success.

Multidrug-resistant (MDR)/extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a significant threat to global TB control [1]. In most cases, treatment of MDR/XDR TB is not standardized, and clinicians have adopted a variety of treatment strategies. These strategies include switching to a regimen of new drugs, increasing the dosage of the same drugs, rarely used drugs (which have widespread resistance), etc. Drug resistance is a manmade phenomenon that is driven by treatment strategy (i.e., regimen). These divergent approaches may differentially drive the evolution of bacteria. Some instances of this evolution have already occurred [2]. The community’s focus has been on drug resistance;…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Darwin: A genomics co-processor provides up to 15,000 X acceleration on long read assembly

of life in fundamental ways. Genomics data, however, is far outpacing Moore’s Law. Third-generation sequencing tech- nologies produce 100× longer reads than second generation technologies and reveal a much broader mutation spectrum of disease and evolution. However, these technologies incur prohibitively high computational costs. Over 1,300 CPU hours are required for reference-guided assembly of the human genome (using [47]), and over 15,600 CPU hours are required for de novo assembly [57]. This paper describes “Darwin” — a co-processor for genomic sequence alignment that, without sacrificing sensitivity, provides up to 15,000× speedup over the state-of-the-art software for reference-guided assembly of third-generation…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Clostridium kluyveri JZZ applied in Chinese strong-flavor liquor production.

Chinese strong-flavor liquor (CSFL), accounting for more than 70% of both Chinese liquor production and sales, was produced by complex fermentation with pit mud. Clostridium kluyveri, an important species coexisted with other microorganisms in fermentation pit mud (FPM), could produce caproic acid, which was subsequently converted to the key CSFL flavor substance ethyl caproate. In this study, we present the first complete genome sequence of C. kluyveri isolated from FPM. Clostridium kluyveri JZZ contains one circular chromosome and one circular plasmid with length of 4,454,353 and 58,581 bp, respectively. 4158 protein-coding genes were predicted and 2792 genes could be assigned with…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Synaptogyrin-2 influences replication of Porcine circovirus 2.

Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is a circular single-stranded DNA virus responsible for a group of diseases collectively known as PCV2 Associated Diseases (PCVAD). Variation in the incidence and severity of PCVAD exists between pigs suggesting a host genetic component involved in pathogenesis. A large-scale genome-wide association study of experimentally infected pigs (n = 974), provided evidence of a host genetic role in PCV2 viremia, immune response and growth during challenge. Host genotype explained 64% of the phenotypic variation for overall viral load, with two major Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) identified on chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the swine leukocyte antigen complex…

Read More »

1 2

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives