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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Progressive approach for SNP calling and haplotype assembly using single molecular sequencing data.

Haplotype information is essential to the complete description and interpretation of genomes, genetic diversity and genetic ancestry. The new technologies can provide Single Molecular Sequencing (SMS) data that cover about 90% of positions over chromosomes. However, the SMS data has a higher error rate comparing to 1% error rate for short reads. Thus, it becomes very difficult for SNP calling and haplotype assembly using SMS reads. Most existing technologies do not work properly for the SMS data.In this paper, we develop a progressive approach for SNP calling and haplotype assembly that works very well for the SMS data. Our method…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

HapCHAT: adaptive haplotype assembly for efficiently leveraging high coverage in long reads.

Haplotype assembly is the process of assigning the different alleles of the variants covered by mapped sequencing reads to the two haplotypes of the genome of a human individual. Long reads, which are nowadays cheaper to produce and more widely available than ever before, have been used to reduce the fragmentation of the assembled haplotypes since their ability to span several variants along the genome. These long reads are also characterized by a high error rate, an issue which may be mitigated, however, with larger sets of reads, when this error rate is uniform across genome positions. Unfortunately, current state-of-the-art…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Parliament2: Fast structural variant calling using optimized combinations of callers

Here we present Parliament2: a structural variant caller which combines multiple best-in-class structural variant callers to create a highly accurate callset. This captures more events than the individual callers achieve independently. Parliament2 uses a call-overlap-genotype approach that is highly extensible to new methods and presents users the choice to run some or all of Breakdancer, Breakseq, CNVnator, Delly, Lumpy, and Manta to run. Parliament2 applies an additional parallelization framework to speed certain callers and executes these in parallel, taking advantage of the different resource requirements to complete structural variant calling much faster than running the programs individually. Parliament2 is available…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Production of glycine-derived ammonia as a low-cost and long-distance antibiotic strategy by Streptomyces

Soil-inhabiting streptomycetes are Natures medicine makers, producing over half of all known antibiotics and many other bioactive natural products. However, these bacteria also produce many volatile compounds, and research into these molecules and their role in soil ecology is rapidly gaining momentum. Here we show that streptomycetes have the ability to kill bacteria over long distances via air-borne antibiosis. Our research shows that streptomycetes do so by producing surprisingly high amounts of the low-cost volatile antimicrobial ammonia, which travels over long distances and antagonises both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Glycine is required as precursor to produce ammonia, and inactivation of…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Bacterial virulence against an oceanic bloom-forming phytoplankter is mediated by algal DMSP

Emiliania huxleyi is a bloom-forming microalga that affects the global sulfur cycle by producing large amounts of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and its volatile metabolic product dimethyl sulfide. Top-down regulation of E. huxleyi blooms has been attributed to viruses and grazers; however, the possible involvement of algicidal bacteria in bloom demise has remained elusive. We demonstrate that a Roseobacter strain, Sulfitobacter D7, that we isolated from a North Atlantic E. huxleyi bloom, exhibited algicidal effects against E. huxleyi upon coculturing. Both the alga and the bacterium were found to co-occur during a natural E. huxleyi bloom, therefore establishing this host-pathogen system as…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

The chromosome-level quality genome provides insights into the evolution of the biosynthesis genes for aroma compounds of Osmanthus fragrans.

Sweet osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans) is a very popular ornamental tree species throughout Southeast Asia and USA particularly for its extremely fragrant aroma. We constructed a chromosome-level reference genome of O. fragrans to assist in studies of the evolution, genetic diversity, and molecular mechanism of aroma development. A total of over 118?Gb of polished reads was produced from HiSeq (45.1?Gb) and PacBio Sequel (73.35?Gb), giving 100× depth coverage for long reads. The combination of Illumina-short reads, PacBio-long reads, and Hi-C data produced the final chromosome quality genome of O. fragrans with a genome size of 727?Mb and a heterozygosity of 1.45…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genotype to phenotype: Diet-by-mitochondrial DNA haplotype interactions drive metabolic flexibility and organismal fitness.

Diet may be modified seasonally or by biogeographic, demographic or cultural shifts. It can differentially influence mitochondrial bioenergetics, retrograde signalling to the nuclear genome, and anterograde signalling to mitochondria. All these interactions have the potential to alter the frequencies of mtDNA haplotypes (mitotypes) in nature and may impact human health. In a model laboratory system, we fed four diets varying in Protein: Carbohydrate (P:C) ratio (1:2, 1:4, 1:8 and 1:16 P:C) to four homoplasmic Drosophila melanogaster mitotypes (nuclear genome standardised) and assayed their frequency in population cages. When fed a high protein 1:2 P:C diet, the frequency of flies harbouring…

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