June 1, 2021  |  

Metagenomes of native and electrode-enriched microbial communities from the Soudan Iron Mine.

Despite apparent carbon limitation, anoxic deep subsurface brines at the Soudan Underground Iron Mine harbor active microbial communities. To characterize these assemblages, we performed shotgun metagenomics of native and enriched samples. Following enrichment on poised electrodes and long read sequencing, we recovered from the metagenome the closed, circular genome of a novel Desulfuromonas sp. with remarkable genomic features that were not fully resolved by short read assembly alone. This organism was essentially absent in unenriched Soudan communities, indicating that electrodes are highly selective for putative metal reducers. Native community metagenomes suggest that carbon cycling is driven by methyl-C1 metabolism, in particular methylotrophic methanogenesis. Our results highlight the promising potential for long reads in metagenomic surveys of low-diversity environments.


April 21, 2020  |  

Cupriavidus sp. strain Ni-2 resistant to high concentration of nickel and its genes responsible for the tolerance by genome comparison.

The widespread use of metals influenced many researchers to examine the relationship between heavy metal toxicity and bacterial resistance. In this study, we have inoculated heavy metal-contaminated soil from Janghang region of South Korea in the nickel-containing media (20 mM Ni2+) for the enrichment. Among dozens of the colonies acquired from the several transfers and serial dilutions with the same concentrations of Ni, the strain Ni-2 was chosen for further studies. The isolates were identified for their phylogenetic affiliations using 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain Ni-2 was close to Cupriavidus metallidurans and was found to be resistant to antibiotics of vancomycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin, and kanamycin by disk diffusion method. Of the isolated strains, Ni-2 was sequenced for the whole genome, since the Ni-resistance seemed to be better than the other strains. From the genome sequence we have found that there was a total of 89 metal-resistance-related genes including 11 Ni-resistance genes, 41 heavy metal (As, Cd, Zn, Hg, Cu, and Co)-resistance genes, 22 cation-efflux genes, 4 metal pumping ATPase genes, and 11 metal transporter genes.


April 21, 2020  |  

Complete genome sequence of Paracoccus sp. Arc7-R13, a silver nanoparticles synthesizing bacterium isolated from Arctic Ocean sediments

Paracoccus sp. Arc7-R13, a silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesizing bacterium, was isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment. Here we describe the complete genome of Paracoccus sp. Arc7-R13. The complete genome contains 4,040,012?bp with 66.66?mol%?G?+?C content, including one circular chromosome of 3,231,929?bp (67.45?mol%?G?+?C content), and eight plasmids with length ranging from 24,536?bp to 199,685?bp. The genome contains 3835 protein-coding genes (CDSs), 49 tRNA genes, as well as 3 rRNA operons as 16S-23S-5S rRNA. Based on the gene annotation and Swiss-Prot analysis, a total of 15 genes belonging to 11 kinds, including silver exporting P-type ATPase (SilP), alkaline phosphatase, nitroreductase, thioredoxin reductase, NADPH dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase, might be related to the synthesis of AgNPs. Meanwhile, many additional genes associated with synthesis of AgNPs such as protein-disulfide isomerase, c-type cytochrome, glutathione synthase and dehydrogenase reductase were also identified.


April 21, 2020  |  

Plasmid-encoded tet(X) genes that confer high-level tigecycline resistance in Escherichia coli.

Tigecycline is one of the last-resort antibiotics to treat complicated infections caused by both multidrug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria1. Tigecycline resistance has sporadically occurred in recent years, primarily due to chromosome-encoding mechanisms, such as overexpression of efflux pumps and ribosome protection2,3. Here, we report the emergence of the plasmid-mediated mobile tigecycline resistance mechanism Tet(X4) in Escherichia coli isolates from China, which is capable of degrading all tetracyclines, including tigecycline and the US FDA newly approved eravacycline. The tet(X4)-harbouring IncQ1 plasmid is highly transferable, and can be successfully mobilized and stabilized in recipient clinical and laboratory strains of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria. It is noteworthy that tet(X4)-positive E.?coli strains, including isolates co-harbouring mcr-1, have been widely detected in pigs, chickens, soil and dust samples in China. In vivo murine models demonstrated that the presence of Tet(X4) led to tigecycline treatment failure. Consequently, the emergence of plasmid-mediated Tet(X4) challenges the clinical efficacy of the entire family of tetracycline antibiotics. Importantly, our study raises concern that the plasmid-mediated tigecycline resistance may further spread into various ecological niches and into clinical high-risk pathogens. Collective efforts are in urgent need to preserve the potency of these essential antibiotics.


April 21, 2020  |  

Complete genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. MEBiC 03485, isolated from deep-sea sediment

Pseudoalteromonas strains are widely distributed in the marine environment and most have attracted considerable interest owing to their ability to synthesize biologically active metabolites. In this study, we report and describe the genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. MEBiC 03485, isolated from the deep-sea sediment of Pacific Ocean at a depth of 2000?m. The complete genome consisted of three contigs with a total genome size of 4,167,407?bp and a GC content of 40.76?l%, and was predicted to contain 4194 protein-coding genes and 131 non-coding RNA genes. The strain MEBiC 03485 genome was also shown to contain genes for diverse metabolic pathways. Genome analysis revealed that the genome of strain MEBiC 03485 was enriched with genes involved in signal transduction, mobile elements, and cold-adaptation, some of which might improve ecological fitness in the deep-sea environment. These findings improve our understanding of microbial adaptation strategies in deep-sea environments.


April 21, 2020  |  

Molecular Characterization of a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain R46 Isolated from a Rabbit

To investigate the mechanisms of multiple resistance and the horizontal transfer of resistance genes in animal pathogens, we characterized the molecular structures of the resistance gene-related sequences in a multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain R46 isolated from a rabbit. Molecular cloning was performed to clone the resistance genes, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were measured to determine the resistance characteristics of the cloned genes and related strains. A conjugation experiment was conducted to assess the transferability of the resistance plasmids. Sequencing and comparative genomic methods were used to analyze the structures of the resistance gene-related sequences. The K. pneumoniae R46 genome consisted of a chromosome and three resistance plasmids named pR46-27, pR46-42, and pR46-270, respectively. The whole genome encoded 34 antibiotic resistance genes including a newly identified chromosome-encoded florfenicol resistance gene named mdfA2. pR46-270, besides encoding 26 antibiotic resistance genes, carried four clusters of heavy metal resistance genes and several virulence-related genes or gene clusters. The plasmid-encoded resistance genes were mostly associated with mobile genetic elements. The plasmid with the most similarity to the floR gene-harboring plasmid pR46-27 was pCTXM-2271, a plasmid from Escherichia coli. The results of this work demonstrated that the plasmids with multidrug resistance genes were present in animal-derived bacteria and more florfenicol resistance genes such as mdfA2 could be present in bacterial populations. The resistance genes encoded on the plasmids may spread between the bacteria of different species or genera and cause the resistance dissemination.


April 21, 2020  |  

Salmonella Genomic Island 3 Is an Integrative and Conjugative Element and Contributes to Copper and Arsenic Tolerance of Salmonella enterica.

Salmonella genomic island 3 (SGI3) was first described as a chromosomal island in Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, a monophasic variant of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The SGI3 DNA sequence detected from Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- isolated in Japan was identical to that of a previously reported one across entire length of 81?kb. SGI3 consists of 86 open reading frames, including a copper homeostasis and silver resistance island (CHASRI) and an arsenic tolerance operon, in addition to genes related to conjugative transfer and DNA replication or partitioning, suggesting that the island is a mobile genetic element. We successfully selected transconjugants that acquired SGI3 after filter-mating experiments using the S. enterica serovars Typhimurium, Heidelberg, Hadar, Newport, Cerro, and Thompson as recipients. Southern blot analysis using I-CeuI-digested genomic DNA demonstrated that SGI3 was integrated into a chromosomal fragment of the transconjugants. PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that SGI3 was inserted into the 3′ end of the tRNA genes pheV or pheR The length of the target site was 52 or 55?bp, and a 55-bp attI sequence indicating generation of the circular form of SGI3 was also detected. The transconjugants had a higher MIC against CuSO4 compared to the recipient strains under anaerobic conditions. Tolerance was defined by the cus gene cluster in the CHASRI. The transconjugants also had distinctly higher MICs against Na2HAsO4 compared to recipient strains under aerobic conditions. These findings clearly demonstrate that SGI3 is an integrative and conjugative element and contributes to the copper and arsenic tolerance of S. enterica.Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology.


April 21, 2020  |  

Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus CC-1, A Novel Marine Selenate/Selenite Reducing Bacterium Producing Metallic Selenides Nanomaterials.

Metallic selenides nanomaterials are widely used in many fields, especially for photothermal therapy and thermoelectric devices. However, the traditional chemogenic methods are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. In this study, the first complete genome data of a metallic selenides producing bacterium Bacillus cereus CC-1 was reported. This strain can not only reduce selenite and selenate into elemental selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs), but also synthesize several metallic selenides nanoparticles when adding metal ions (Pb2+, Ag+ and Bi3+) and selenite simultaneously. The size of the genome is 5,308,319 bp with 36.07% G+C content. Several putative genes responsible for heavy metal resistance, salt resistance, and selenate reduction were found. This genome data provide fundamental information, which support the use of this strain for the production of biocompatible photothermal and thermoelectric nanomaterials under mild conditions.


April 21, 2020  |  

Genetic variation in the conjugative plasmidome of a hospital effluent multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strain.

Bacteria harboring conjugative plasmids have the potential for spreading antibiotic resistance through horizontal gene transfer. It is described that the selection and dissemination of antibiotic resistance is enhanced by stressors, like metals or antibiotics, which can occur as environmental contaminants. This study aimed at unveiling the composition of the conjugative plasmidome of a hospital effluent multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strain (H1FC54) under different mating conditions. To meet this objective, plasmid pulsed field gel electrophoresis, optical mapping analyses and DNA sequencing were used in combination with phenotype analysis. Strain H1FC54 was observed to harbor five plasmids, three of which were conjugative and two of these, pH1FC54_330 and pH1FC54_140, contained metal and antibiotic resistance genes. Transconjugants obtained in the absence or presence of tellurite (0.5?µM or 5?µM), arsenite (0.5?µM, 5?µM or 15?µM) or ceftazidime (10?mg/L) and selected in the presence of sodium azide (100?mg/L) and tetracycline (16?mg/L) presented distinct phenotypes, associated with the acquisition of different plasmid combinations, including two co-integrate plasmids, of 310 kbp and 517 kbp. The variable composition of the conjugative plasmidome, the formation of co-integrates during conjugation, as well as the transfer of non-transferable plasmids via co-integration, and the possible association between antibiotic, arsenite and tellurite tolerance was demonstrated. These evidences bring interesting insights into the comprehension of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underlie antibiotic resistance propagation in the environment. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


April 21, 2020  |  

Complete genome sequence of Salinigranum rubrum GX10T, an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a marine solar saltern

Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, microbes inhabiting hypersaline environments have been investigated largely based on genomic characteristics. Salinigranum rubrum GX10T, the type species of the genus Salinigranum belonging to the euryarchaeal family Haloferacaceae, was isolated from the brine of Gangxi marine solar saltern near Weihai, China. Similar with most members of the class Halobacteria, S. rubrum GX10T is an extreme halophile requiring at least 1.5?M NaCl for growth and 3.1?M NaCl for optimum growth. We sequenced and annotated the complete genome of S. rubrum GX10T, which was found to be 4,973,118?bp and comprise one chromosome and five plasmids. A total of 4966 protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes and 6 rRNA genes were obtained. The isoelectric point distribution for the predict proteins was observed with an acidic peak, which reflected the adaption of S. rubrum GX10T to the halophilic environment. Genes related to potassium uptake, sodium efflux as well as compatible-solute biosynthesis and transport were identified, which were responsible for the resistance to osmotic stress. Genes related to heavy metal resistance, CRISPR-Cas system and light transform system were also detected. This study reports the first genome in the genus Salinigranum and provides a basis for understanding resistance strategies to harsh environment at the genomic level.


April 21, 2020  |  

Characterization of a blaIMP-4-carrying plasmid from Enterobacter cloacae of swine origin.

To characterize an MDR blaIMP-4-harbouring plasmid from Enterobacter cloacae EC62 of swine origin in China.Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 from E. cloacae EC62 was transferred by conjugation via filter mating into Escherichia coli J53. Plasmid DNA was extracted from an E. coli J53 transconjugant and sequenced using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. MIC values for both the isolate EC62 and the transconjugant were determined using the broth microdilution and agar dilution methods. Plasmid stability in both the isolate EC62 and the transconjugant was assessed through a series of passages on antibiotic-free media.Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 is 314351?bp in length, encodes 369 predicted proteins and harbours a novel class 1 integron carrying blaIMP-4 and a group II intron. The blaIMP-4-bearing plasmid belongs to the IncHI2/ST1 incompatibility group. Sequence analysis showed that pIMP-4-EC62 carries four MDR regions and several gene clusters encoding heavy metal resistance. Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 was stably maintained in both the E. cloacae EC62 isolate and the transconjugant E. coli J53-pIMP-4-EC62 in the absence of selective pressure. Analysis of the evolutionary relatedness of selected IncHI2 plasmids indicates that ST1-type plasmids are key carriers of carbapenemase genes among IncHI2 plasmids.pIMP-4-EC62 represents the first fully sequenced IncHI2-type blaIMP-4-harbouring plasmid from E. cloacae in China. Co-location of blaIMP-4 with other resistance genes on an MDR plasmid is likely to further accelerate the dissemination of blaIMP-4 by co-selection among bacteria from humans, animals and the environment under the selective pressure of other antimicrobial agents, heavy metals and disinfectants. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


April 21, 2020  |  

Genome Comparisons of Wild Isolates of Caulobacter crescentus Reveal Rates of Inversion and Horizontal Gene Transfer.

Since previous interspecies comparisons of Caulobacter genomes have revealed extensive genome rearrangements, we decided to compare the nucleotide sequences of four C. crescentus genomes, NA1000, CB1, CB2, and CB13. To accomplish this goal, we used PacBio sequencing technology to determine the nucleotide sequence of the CB1, CB2, and CB13 genomes, and obtained each genome sequence as a single contig. To correct for possible sequencing errors, each genome was sequenced twice. The only differences we observed between the two sets of independently determined sequences were random omissions of a single base in a small percentage of the homopolymer regions where a single base is repeated multiple times. Comparisons of these four genomes indicated that horizontal gene transfer events that included small numbers of genes occurred at frequencies in the range of 10-3 to 10-4 insertions per generation. Large insertions were about 100 times less frequent. Also, in contrast to previous interspecies comparisons, we found no genome rearrangements when the closely related NA1000, CB1, and CB2 genomes were compared, and only eight inversions and one translocation when the more distantly related CB13 genome was compared to the other genomes. Thus, we estimate that inversions occur at a rate of one per 10 to 12 million generations in Caulobacter genomes. The inversions seem to be complex events that include the simultaneous creation of indels.


April 21, 2020  |  

Genetic characterization of an MDR/virulence genomic element carrying two T6SS gene clusters in a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate of swine origin.

Multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates rarely cause infections in pigs. The aim of this study was to investigate a multiresistant porcine K. pneumoniae isolate for plasmidic and chromosomal antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes and their genetic environment.K. pneumoniae strain ZYST1 originated from a pig with pneumonia. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using broth microdilution. Conjugation experiments were conducted using Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient. The complete sequences of the chromosomal DNA and the plasmids were generated by WGS and analysed for the presence of resistance and virulence genes.The MDR K. pneumoniae ST1 strain ZYST1 contained three plasmids belonging to incompatibility groups IncFIIk5-FIB, IncI1 and IncX4, respectively. The IncFIIk5-FIB plasmid carried the resistance genes aadA2, mph(A), sul1 and aph(3′)-Ia, and the IncI1 plasmid carried aadA22 and erm(B). No resistance genes were present on the IncX4 plasmid. Plasmids related to the aforementioned three plasmids were also present in other Enterobacteriaceae species from humans, animals and the environment. Bioinformatic analyses identified a chromosomal 904?kb MDR element flanked by two copies of ISKpn26. This element included virulence factors, such as a type VI secretion system (T6SS) and genes for type 1 fimbriae, the toxin-antitoxin system HipA/HipB, antimicrobial resistance genes, such as blaSHV-187, mdtk, catA and the multiple antibiotic resistance operon marRABC, and heavy metal resistance determinants, such as chrB/chrA and tehA/tehB.This study reports a novel 904?kb MDR/virulence genomic element and three important plasmids coexisting in a clinical K. pneumoniae isolate of animal origin. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


April 21, 2020  |  

Real time monitoring of Aeromonas salmonicida evolution in response to successive antibiotic therapies in a commercial fish farm.

Our ability to predict evolutionary trajectories of pathogens in response to antibiotic pressure is one of the promising leverage to fight against the present antibiotic resistance worldwide crisis. Yet, few studies tackled this question in situ at the outbreak level, due to the difficulty to link a given pathogenic clone evolution with its precise antibiotic exposure over time. In this study, we monitored the real-time evolution of an Aeromonas salmonicida clone in response to successive antibiotic and vaccine therapies in a commercial fish farm. The clone was responsible for a four-year outbreak of furunculosis within a Recirculating Aquaculture System Salmo salar farm in China, and we reconstructed the precise tempo of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) acquisition events during this period. The resistance profile provided by the acquired MGEs closely mirrored the antibiotics used to treat the outbreak, and we evidenced that two subclonal groups developed similar resistances although unrelated MGE acquisitions. Finally, we also demonstrated the efficiency of vaccination in outbreak management and its positive effect on antibiotic resistance prevalence. Our study provides unprecedented knowledge critical to understand evolutionary trajectories of resistant pathogens outside the laboratory. © 2019 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


April 21, 2020  |  

Identification of plasmid encoded osmoregulatory genes from halophilic bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of halophytes.

Bacterial plasmids carry genes that code for additional traits such as osmoregulation, CO2 fixation, antibiotic and heavy metal resistance, root nodulation and nitrogen fixation. The main objective of the current study was to identify plasmid-conferring osmoregulatory genes in bacteria isolated from rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils of halophytes (Salsola stocksii and Atriplex amnicola). More than 55% of halophilic bacteria from the rhizosphere and 70% from non-rhizospheric soils were able to grow at 3?M salt concentrations. All the strains showed optimum growth at 1.5-3.0?M NaCl. Bacterial strains from the Salsola rhizosphere showed maximum (31%) plasmid elimination during curing experiments as compared to bacterial strains from the Atriplex rhizosphere and non-rhizospheric soils. Two plasmid cured strains Bacillus HL2HP6 and Oceanobacillus HL2RP7 lost their ability to grow in halophilic medium, but they grew well on LB medium. The plasmid cured strains also showed a change in sensitivity to specific antibiotics. These plasmids were isolated and transformed into E. coli strains and growth response of wild-type and transformed E. coli strains was compared at 1.5-4?M NaCl concentrations. Chromosomal DNA and plasmids from Bacillus filamentosus HL2HP6 were sequenced by using high throughput sequencing approach. Results of functional analysis of plasmid sequences showed different proteins and enzymes involved in osmoregulation of bacteria, such as trehalose, ectoine synthetase, porins, proline, alanine, inorganic ion transporters, dehydrogenases and peptidases. Our results suggested that plasmid conferring osmoregulatory genes play a vital role to maintain internal osmotic balance of bacterial cells and these genes can be used to develop salt tolerant transgenic crops.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.


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