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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of the genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen) is a medicinal plant of the Lamiaceae family, and its dried roots have long been used in traditional Chinese medicine with hydrophilic phenolic acids and tanshinones as pharmaceutically active components (Zhang et al., 2014; Xu et al., 2016). The first step of tanshinone biosynthesis is bicyclization of the general diterpene precursor (E,E,E)-geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to copalyl diphosphate (CPP) by CPP synthases (CPSs), which is followed by a cyclization or rearrangement reaction catalyzed by kaurene synthase-like enzymes (KSL).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Eucommia ulmoides: genome structure and evolution.

Eucommia ulmoides is an important traditional medicinal plant that is used for the production of locative Eucommia rubber. In this study, the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of E. ulmoides was obtained by total DNA sequencing; this is the first cp genome sequence of the order Garryales. The cp genome of E. ulmoides was 163,341 bp long and included a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions (31,300 bp), one large single copy (LSC) region (86,592 bp), and one small single copy (SSC) region (14,149 bp). The genome structure and GC content were similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes and contained 115 unique…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Chloroplast genomes: diversity, evolution, and applications in genetic engineering.

Chloroplasts play a crucial role in sustaining life on earth. The availability of over 800 sequenced chloroplast genomes from a variety of land plants has enhanced our understanding of chloroplast biology, intracellular gene transfer, conservation, diversity, and the genetic basis by which chloroplast transgenes can be engineered to enhance plant agronomic traits or to produce high-value agricultural or biomedical products. In this review, we discuss the impact of chloroplast genome sequences on understanding the origins of economically important cultivated species and changes that have taken place during domestication. We also discuss the potential biotechnological applications of chloroplast genomes.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Swertia mussotii using the PacBio RS II platform.

Swertia mussotii is an important medicinal plant that has great economic and medicinal value and is found on the Qinghai Tibetan Plateau. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of S. mussotii is 153,431 bp in size, with a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions of 25,761 bp each that separate an large single-copy (LSC) region of 83,567 bp and an a small single-copy (SSC) region of 18,342 bp. The S. mussotii cp genome encodes 84 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The identity, number, and GC content of S. mussotii cp genes were similar…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Variation of 45S rDNA intergenic spacers in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Approximately seven hundred 45S rRNA genes (rDNA) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are organised in two 4 Mbp-long arrays of tandem repeats arranged in head-to-tail fashion separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS). These arrays make up 5?% of the A. thaliana genome. IGS are rapidly evolving sequences and frequent rearrangements inside the rDNA loci have generated considerable interspecific and even intra-individual variability which allows to distinguish among otherwise highly conserved rRNA genes. The IGS has not been comprehensively described despite its potential importance in regulation of rDNA transcription and replication. Here we describe the detailed sequence variation in the complete…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The nuclear genome of Rhazya stricta and the evolution of alkaloid diversity in a medically relevant clade of Apocynaceae.

Alkaloid accumulation in plants is activated in response to stress, is limited in distribution and specific alkaloid repertoires are variable across taxa. Rauvolfioideae (Apocynaceae, Gentianales) represents a major center of structural expansion in the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) yielding thousands of unique molecules including highly valuable chemotherapeutics. The paucity of genome-level data for Apocynaceae precludes a deeper understanding of MIA pathway evolution hindering the elucidation of remaining pathway enzymes and the improvement of MIA availability in planta or in vitro. We sequenced the nuclear genome of Rhazya stricta (Apocynaceae, Rauvolfioideae) and present this high quality assembly in comparison with that…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

An improved high-quality draft genome sequence of Carnobacterium inhibens subsp. inhibens strain K1(T).

Despite their ubiquity and their involvement in food spoilage, the genus Carnobacterium remains rather sparsely characterized at the genome level. Carnobacterium inhibens K1(T) is a member of the Carnobacteriaceae family within the class Bacilli. This strain is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the intestine of an Atlantic salmon. The present study determined the genome sequence and annotation of Carnobacterium inhibens K1(T). The genome comprised 2,748,608 bp with a G?+?C content of 34.85 %, which included 2621 protein-coding genes and 116 RNA genes. The strain contained five contigs corresponding to presumptive plasmids of sizes: 19,036; 24,250; 26,581; 65,272; and 65,904 bp.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Amaranthus species (Amaranthaceae).

The amaranth genus contains many important grain and weedy species. We further our understanding of the genus through the development of a complete reference chloroplast genome.A high-quality Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Amaranthaceae) chloroplast genome assembly was developed using long-read technology. This reference genome was used to reconstruct the chloroplast genomes for two closely related grain species (A. cruentus and A. caudatus) and their putative progenitor (A. hybridus). The reference genome was 150,518 bp and possesses a circular structure of two inverted repeats (24,352 bp) separated by small (17,941 bp) and large (83,873 bp) single-copy regions; it encodes 111 genes, 72 for proteins.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analyses of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 resequenced by single-molecule real-time sequencing.

As a third-generation sequencing (TGS) method, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology provides long read length, and it is well suited for resequencing projects and de novo assembly. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 was characterized and resequenced using SMRT technology. PA1 was also subjected to genomic, comparative and pan-genomic analyses. The multidrug resistant strain PA1 possesses a 6,498,072 bp genome and a sequence type of ST-782. The genome of PA1 was also visualized, and the results revealed the details of general genome annotations, virulence factors, regulatory proteins (RPs), secretion system proteins, type II toxin-antitoxin (T-A) pairs and genomic islands. Whole genome comparison analysis…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome size estimation of Chinese cultured artemisia annua L.

Almost all of antimalarial artemisinin is extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Artemisia annua L. However, under the condition of insufficient genomic in- formation and unresolved genetic backgrounds, regulatory mechanism of artemisinin biosynthetic pathway has not yet been clear. The genome size of genuine A. annua plants is an especially important and fundamental parameter, which helpful for further insight into genomic studies of ar- temisinin biosynthesis and improvement. In current study, all those genome sizes of A. annua samples collected with Barcoding identification were evaluated to be 1.38-1.49 Gb by Flow Cytometry (FCM) with Nipponbare as the bench- mark…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Velez bacillusL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role evaluation and all Genome Analysis

[Objective] Clear Velez bacillus(Bacillus S rDNA Sequence) L-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role clear Bacteria L-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability and may be of Antagonistic mechanism. [Methods] by in vitro determination, living determination and pathogenic bacteria mycelium morphology observation evaluation StrainL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of antagonistic activity. To pear Botrytis cinerea bacteria for try pathogenic bacteria use Oxford Cup method determination StrainL-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability. UsePacbio rsiiThree generations sequencing technology determinationL-1Of all gene sequence will all gene sequence and gene protein sequence databaseBLASTComparison Analysis prediction StrainL-1May be of…

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