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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the heavy metal resistant bacterium Altererythrobacter atlanticus 26DY36(T), isolated from deep-sea sediment of the North Atlantic Mid-ocean ridge.

Altererythrobacter atlanticus 26DY36(T) (CGMCC 1.12411(T)=JCM 18865(T)) was isolated from the North Atlantic Mid-Ocean Ridge. The strain is resistant to heavy metals, such as Mn(2+) (200 mM), Co(2+) (2.0mM), Cu(2+) (1mM), Zn(2+) (1mM), Hg(2+) (0.1mM) and Cd(2+) (0.5mM). Here we describe the genome sequence and annotation, as well as the features of the organism. A. atlanticus 26DY36(T) harbors a chromosome (3,386,291 bp) and a circular plasmid (88,815 bp). The genome contains 3322 protein-coding genes (2483 with predicted functions), 47 tRNA genes and 6 rRNA genes. A. atlanticus 26DY36(T) encodes dozens of genes related to heavy metal resistance and has potential applications…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

SMRT sequencing of the Campylobacter coli BfR-CA-9557 genome sequence reveals unique methylation motifs.

Campylobacter species are the most prevalent bacterial pathogen causing acute enteritis worldwide. In contrast to Campylobacter jejuni, about 5 % of Campylobacter coli strains exhibit susceptibility to restriction endonuclease digestion by DpnI cutting specifically 5′-G(m)ATC-3′ motifs. This indicates significant differences in DNA methylation between both microbial species. The goal of the study was to analyze the methylome of a C. coli strain susceptible to DpnI digestion, to identify its methylation motifs and restriction modification systems (RM-systems), and compare them to related organisms like C. jejuni and Helicobacter pylori. Using one SMRT cell and the PacBio RS sequencing technology followed by PacBio…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Isolation of Jeotgalibacillus malaysiensis sp. nov. from a sandy beach, and emended description of the genus Jeotgalibacillus.

A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated D5(T), was isolated from seawater collected from a sandy beach in a southern state of Malaysia and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that this isolate belongs to the genus Jeotgalibacillus, with 99.87% similarity to Jeotgalibacillus alimentarius JCM 10872(T). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain D5(T) with J. alimentarius JCM 10872(T) demonstrated 26.3% relatedness. The peptidoglycan type was A1a linked directly to L-lysine as the diamino acid. The predominant quinones identified in strain D5(T) were menaquinones MK-7 and MK-8.The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C15:0. The…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The functions of DNA methylation by CcrM in Caulobacter crescentus: a global approach.

DNA methylation is involved in a diversity of processes in bacteria, including maintenance of genome integrity and regulation of gene expression. Here, using Caulobacter crescentus as a model, we exploit genome-wide experimental methods to uncover the functions of CcrM, a DNA methyltransferase conserved in most Alphaproteobacteria. Using single molecule sequencing, we provide evidence that most CcrM target motifs (GANTC) switch from a fully methylated to a hemi-methylated state when they are replicated, and back to a fully methylated state at the onset of cell division. We show that DNA methylation by CcrM is not required for the control of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Expansion of the genetic toolkit for metabolic engineering of Clostridium pasteurianum: chromosomal gene disruption of the endogenous CpaAI restriction enzyme.

Clostridium pasteurianum is one of the most promising biofuel producers within the genus Clostridium owing to its unique metabolic ability to ferment glycerol into butanol. Although an efficient means is available for introducing foreign DNA to C. pasteurianum, major genetic tools, such as gene knockout, knockdown, or genome editing, are lacking, preventing metabolic engineering of C. pasteurianum.Here we present a methodology for performing chromosomal gene disruption in C. pasteurianum using the programmable lactococcus Ll.ltrB group II intron. Gene disruption was initially found to be impeded by inefficient electrotransformation of Escherichia coli-C. pasteurianum shuttle vectors, presumably due to host restriction. By…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomes of diverse isolates of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus.

The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the numerically dominant photosynthetic organism in the oligotrophic oceans, and a model system in marine microbial ecology. Here we report 27 new whole genome sequences (2 complete and closed; 25 of draft quality) of cultured isolates, representing five major phylogenetic clades of Prochlorococcus. The sequenced strains were isolated from diverse regions of the oceans, facilitating studies of the drivers of microbial diversity-both in the lab and in the field. To improve the utility of these genomes for comparative genomics, we also define pre-computed clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs), indicating how genes are distributed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the Leisingera aquimarina type strain (DSM 24565(T)), a member of the marine Roseobacter clade rich in extrachromosomal elements.

Leisingera aquimarina Vandecandelaere et al. 2008 is a member of the genomically well characterized Roseobacter clade within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine Roseobacter clade are metabolically versatile and involved in carbon fixation and biogeochemical processes. They form a physiologically heterogeneous group, found predominantly in coastal or polar waters, especially in symbiosis with algae, in microbial mats, in sediments or associated with invertebrates. Here we describe the features of L. aquimarina DSM 24565(T) together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation. The 5,344,253 bp long genome consists of one chromosome and an unusually high number of seven extrachromosomal elements…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Enhanced 5-methylcytosine detection in single-molecule, real-time sequencing via Tet1 oxidation.

DNA methylation serves as an important epigenetic mark in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. In eukaryotes, the most common epigenetic mark is 5-methylcytosine, whereas prokaryotes can have 6-methyladenine, 4-methylcytosine, or 5-methylcytosine. Single-molecule, real-time sequencing is capable of directly detecting all three types of modified bases. However, the kinetic signature of 5-methylcytosine is subtle, which presents a challenge for detection. We investigated whether conversion of 5-methylcytosine to 5-carboxylcytosine using the enzyme Tet1 would enhance the kinetic signature, thereby improving detection.We characterized the kinetic signatures of various cytosine modifications, demonstrating that 5-carboxylcytosine has a larger impact on the local polymerase rate than…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529(T)), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis.

TF-218(T) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218(T) contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Phaeobacter caeruleus type strain (DSM 24564(T)), a surface-associated member of the marine Roseobacter clade.

In 2009 Phaeobacter caeruleus was described as a novel species affiliated with the marine Roseobacter clade, which, in turn, belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria. The genus Phaeobacter is well known for members that produce various secondary metabolites. Here we report of putative quorum sensing systems, based on the finding of six N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthetases, and show that the blue color of P. caeruleus is probably due to the production of the secondary metabolite indigoidine. Therefore, P. caeruleus might have inhibitory effects on other bacteria. In this study the genome of the type strain DSM 24564(T) was sequenced, annotated and characterized.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Implementation and data analysis of Tn-seq, whole genome resequencing, and single-molecule real time sequencing for bacterial genetics.

Few discoveries have been more transformative to the biological sciences than the development of DNA sequencing technologies. The rapid advancement of sequencing and bioinformatics tools has revolutionized bacterial genetics, deepening our understanding of model and clinically relevant organisms. Although application of newer sequencing technologies to studies in bacterial genetics is increasing, the implementation of DNA sequencing technologies and development of the bioinformatics tools required for analyzing the large data sets generated remains a challenge for many. In this minireview, we have chosen to summarize three sequencing approaches that are particularly useful for bacterial genetics. We provide resources for scientists new…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Lutibacter profundi LP1T isolated from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent system

Lutibacter profundi LP1T within the family Flavobacteriaceae was isolated from a biofilm growing on the surface of a black smoker chimney at the Loki’s Castle vent field, located on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge. The complete genome of L. profundi LP1T is the first genome to be published within the genus Lutibacter. L. profundi LP1T consists of a single 2,966,978 bp circular chromosome with a GC content of 29.8%. The genome comprises 2,537 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA species and 2 rRNA operons. The microaerophilic, organotrophic isolate contains genes for all central carbohydrate metabolic pathways. However, genes for the oxidative branch of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Identification of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 DNA methyltransferase, its targets, and physiological roles.

DNA methylation is widespread among prokaryotes, and most DNA methylation reactions are catalyzed by adenine DNA methyltransferases, which are part of restriction-modification (R-M) systems. R-M systems are known for their role in the defense against foreign DNA; however, DNA methyltransferases also play functional roles in gene regulation. In this study, we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to uncover the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We identified a conserved sequence motif targeted by an adenine methyltransferase of a type I R-M system and quantified the presence of N(6)-methyladenine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Changes…

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