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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Production of the bioactive compounds violacein and indolmycin is conditional in a maeA mutant of Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea S4054 lacking the malic enzyme.

It has previously been reported that some strains of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea produce the purple bioactive pigment violacein as well as the antibiotic compound indolmycin, hitherto only found in Streptomyces. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relative role of each of these two compounds as antibacterial compounds in P. luteoviolacea S4054. Using Tn10 transposon mutagenesis, a mutant strain that was significantly reduced in violacein production in mannose-containing substrates was created. Full genome analyses revealed that the vio-biosynthetic gene cluster was not interrupted by the transposon; instead the insertion was located to the maeA gene…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genome of Dietzia timorensis ID05-A0528(T) revealed the genetic basis for its saline-alkali tolerance.

The type strain Dietzia timorensis ID05-A0528(T), was reported to be able to survive in the highly saline and alkaline environments with diverse carbon sources. In order to more pertinently understand the genetic mechanisms of its environmental tolerance and crude oil emulsification, we reported the complete genome sequence of the strain in the study. The genome contains only one circular chromosome, with the total size of 3,607,892 bps, and the G+C content of this strain is 65.58%, much lower than other type strains of this genus. It was found that strain ID05-A0528(T) contains genes involved in transportation and biosynthesis of compatible…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts.

Ascomycete yeasts are metabolically diverse, with great potential for biotechnology. Here, we report the comparative genome analysis of 29 taxonomically and biotechnologically important yeasts, including 16 newly sequenced. We identify a genetic code change, CUG-Ala, in Pachysolen tannophilus in the clade sister to the known CUG-Ser clade. Our well-resolved yeast phylogeny shows that some traits, such as methylotrophy, are restricted to single clades, whereas others, such as l-rhamnose utilization, have patchy phylogenetic distributions. Gene clusters, with variable organization and distribution, encode many pathways of interest. Genomics can predict some biochemical traits precisely, but the genomic basis of others, such as…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization and comparative overview of complete sequences of the first plasmids of Pandoraea across clinical and non-clinical strains.

To date, information on plasmid analysis in Pandoraea spp. is scarce. To address the gap of knowledge on this, the complete sequences of eight plasmids from Pandoraea spp. namely Pandoraea faecigallinarum DSM 23572(T) (pPF72-1, pPF72-2), Pandoraea oxalativorans DSM 23570(T) (pPO70-1, pPO70-2, pPO70-3, pPO70-4), Pandoraea vervacti NS15 (pPV15) and Pandoraea apista DSM 16535(T) (pPA35) were studied for the first time in this study. The information on plasmid sequences in Pandoraea spp. is useful as the sequences did not match any known plasmid sequence deposited in public databases. Replication genes were not identified in some plasmids, a situation that has led to…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Clostridium estertheticum DSM 8809, a microbe identified in spoiled vacuum packed beef.

Blown pack spoilage (BPS) is a major issue for the beef industry. Etiological agents of BPS involve members of a group of Clostridium species, including Clostridium estertheticum which has the ability to produce gas, mostly carbon dioxide, under anaerobic psychotrophic growth conditions. This spore-forming bacterium grows slowly under laboratory conditions, and it can take up to 3 months to produce a workable culture. These characteristics have limited the study of this commercially challenging bacterium. Consequently information on this bacterium is limited and no effective controls are currently available to confidently detect and manage this production risk. In this study the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. strain CIB 2401 of the phylum Chlorobi.

To date, only 13 genomes of green sulfur bacteria (family Chlorobiaceae) have been sequenced. The sequenced strains do not cover the full phylogenetic diversity of the family. We determined the complete genome sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. strain CIB 2401, thereby increasing the genome information for the poorly represented marine Chlorobiaceae. Copyright © 2016 Nabhan et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of a subdivision 6 Acidobacterium strain.

Although ubiquitous and abundant in soils, acidobacteria have mostly escaped isolation and remain poorly investigated. Only a few cultured representatives and just eight genomes of subdivisions 1, 3, and 4 are available to date. Here, we determined the complete genome sequence of strain HEG_-6_39, the first genome of Acidobacterium subdivision 6. Copyright © 2016 Huang et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Cupriavidus malaysiensis sp. nov., a novel poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) accumulating bacterium isolated from the Malaysian environment.

Bacterial classification on the basis of a polyphasic approach was conducted on three poly(3 hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] accumulating bacterial strains that were isolated from samples collected from Malaysian environments; Kulim Lake, Sg. Pinang river and Sg. Manik paddy field. The Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, non-sporulating and non-fermenting bacteria were shown to belong to the genus Cupriavidus of the Betaproteobacteria on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The sequence similarity value with their near phylogenetic neighbour, Cupriavidus pauculus LMG3413T, was 98.5%. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization values (8-58%) and ribotyping analysis both enabled these strains to be differentiated from related Cupriavidus…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The odyssey of the ancestral Escherich strain through culture collections: an example of allopatric diversification.

More than a century ago, Theodor Escherich isolated the bacterium that was to become Escherichia coli, one of the most studied organisms. Not long after, the strain began an odyssey and landed in many laboratories across the world. As laboratory culture conditions could be responsible for major changes in bacterial strains, we conducted a genome analysis of isolates of this emblematic strain from different culture collections (England, France, the United States, Germany). Strikingly, many discrepancies between the isolates were observed, as revealed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), the presence of virulence-associated genes, core genome MLST, and single nucleotide polymorphism/indel analyses.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Loss of RXFP2 and INSL3 genes in Afrotheria shows that testicular descent is the ancestral condition in placental mammals.

Descent of testes from a position near the kidneys into the lower abdomen or into the scrotum is an important developmental process that occurs in all placental mammals, with the exception of five afrotherian lineages. Since soft-tissue structures like testes are not preserved in the fossil record and since key parts of the placental mammal phylogeny remain controversial, it has been debated whether testicular descent is the ancestral or derived condition in placental mammals. To resolve this debate, we used genomic data of 71 mammalian species and analyzed the evolution of two key genes (relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 [RXFP2]…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genome sequence of Rhodobaca barguzinensis alga05 (DSM 19920) documents its adaptation for life in soda lakes.

Soda lakes, with their high salinity and high pH, pose a very challenging environment for life. Microorganisms living in these harsh conditions have had to adapt their physiology and gene inventory. Therefore, we analyzed the complete genome of the haloalkaliphilic photoheterotrophic bacterium Rhodobaca barguzinensis strain alga05. It consists of a 3,899,419 bp circular chromosome with 3624 predicted coding sequences. In contrast to most of Rhodobacterales, this strain lacks any extrachromosomal elements. To identify the genes responsible for adaptation to high pH, we compared the gene inventory in the alga05 genome with genomes of 17 reference strains belonging to order Rhodobacterales. We…

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