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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Verrucomicrobium sp. strain GAS474, a novel bacterium isolated from soil.

Verrucomicrobium sp. strain GAS474 was isolated from the mineral soil of a temperate deciduous forest in central Massachusetts. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of this phylogenetically novel organism, which consists of a total of 3,763,444 bp on a single scaffold, with a 65.8% GC content and 3,273 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2018 Pold et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. strain HL-69, isolated from a benthic microbial mat from a magnesium sulfate-dominated hypersaline lake.

The complete genome sequence ofCyanobacteriumsp. strain HL-69 consists of 3,155,247 bp and contains 2,897 predicted genes comprising a chromosome and two plasmids. The genome is consistent with a halophilic nondiazotrophic phototrophic lifestyle, and this organism is able to synthesize most B vitamins and produces several secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2018 Mobberley et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genomes of the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens strains YIK11 and MIC269

Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two strains, which were isolated from sediment samples collected in Korea and Micronesia, and both were classified as members of Nonlabens spp. The complete genome sequence of Nonlabens sp. strain YIK11 consists of 3,260,677bp in two contigs while the one from strain MIC269 consists of 2,884,293bp in one contig, without plasmid. The genomes of YIK11 and MIC269 contain three and two genes encoding rhodopsins of different types, respectively.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High- quality draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from fungus gardens grown by Trachymyrmex septentrionalis ants.

For their food source, Trachymyrmex septentrionalis ants raise symbiotic fungus gardens that contain bacteria whose functions are poorly understood. Here, we report the genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from these fungus gardens to better describe the ecology of these strains and their potential to produce secondary metabolites in this niche.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Tuber borchii Vittad., a whitish edible truffle.

The ascomycete Tuber borchii (Pezizomycetes) is a whitish edible truffle that establishes ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with trees and shrubs. This fungus is ubiquitous in Europe and is also cultivated outside Europe. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of T. borchii strain Tbo3840 (97.18 Mb in 969 scaffolds, with 12,346 predicted protein-coding genes).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the halophile bacterium Kushneria konosiri X49T, isolated from salt-fermented Konosirus punctatus

Kushneria konosiri X49T is a member of the Halomonadaceae family within the order Oceanospirillales and can be isolated from salt-fermented larval gizzard shad. The genome of K. konosiri X49T reported here provides a genetic basis for its halophilic character. Diverse genes were involved in salt-in and -out strategies enabling adaptation of X49T to hypersaline environments. Due to resistance to high salt concentrations, genome research of K. konosiri X49T will contribute to the improvement of environmental and biotechnological usage by enhancing understanding of the osmotic equilibrium in the cytoplasm. Its genome consists of 3,584,631 bp, with an average Gthinspace+thinspaceC content of 59.1%,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Near-complete genome sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum T523, a phylotype I tomato phytopathogen isolated from the Philippines.

Ralstonia solanacearum strain T523 is the major phytopathogen causing tomato bacterial wilt in the Philippines. Here, we report the complete chromosome and draft megaplasmid genomes with predicted gene inventories supporting rhizo- sphere processes, extensive plant virulence effectors, and the production of bioac- tive signaling metabolites, such as ralstonin, micacocidin, and homoserine lactone.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genomic sequence of a novel cold-adapted bacterium, Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil.

Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from the petroleum-contaminated soil of the Qaidam Basin, can use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy at 20 °C. The genome of P. maritimus strain Y42 has been sequenced to provide information on its properties. Genomic analysis shows that the genome of strain Y42 contains one circular DNA chromosome with a size of 3,718,896 bp and a GC content of 48.8%, and three plasmids (329,482; 89,073; and 12,282 bp). Although the strain Y42 did not show a remarkably higher ability in degrading crude oil than other oil-degrading bacteria, the existence of strain Y42 played a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The gold-standard genome of Aspergillus niger NRRL 3 enables a detailed view of the diversity of sugar catabolism in fungi.

The fungal kingdom is too large to be discovered exclusively by classical genetics. The access to omics data opens a new opportunity to study the diversity within the fungal kingdom and how adaptation to new environments shapes fungal metabolism. Genomes are the foundation of modern science but their quality is crucial when analysing omics data. In this study, we demonstrate how one gold-standard genome can improve functional prediction across closely related species to be able to identify key enzymes, reactions and pathways with the focus on primary carbon metabolism. Based on this approach we identified alternative genes encoding various steps…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

BELLA: Berkeley Efficient Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper

De novo assembly is the process of reconstructing genomes from DNA fragments (reads), which may contain redundancy and errors. Longer reads simplify assembly and improve contiguity of the output, but current long-read technologies come with high error rates. A crucial step of de novo genome assembly for long reads consists of finding overlapping reads. We present Berkeley Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper (BELLA), which implement a novel approach to compute overlaps using Sparse Generalized Matrix Multiplication (SpGEMM). We present a probabilistic model which demonstrates the soundness of using short, fixed length k-mers to detect overlaps, avoiding expensive pairwise alignment…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Hardwood tree genomics: Unlocking woody plant biology.

Woody perennial angiosperms (i.e., hardwood trees) are polyphyletic in origin and occur in most angiosperm orders. Despite their independent origins, hardwoods have shared physiological, anatomical, and life history traits distinct from their herbaceous relatives. New high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have provided access to numerous woody plant genomes beyond the early reference genomes of Populus and Eucalyptus, references that now include willow and oak, with pecan and chestnut soon to follow. Genomic studies within these diverse and undomesticated species have successfully linked genes to ecological, physiological, and developmental traits directly. Moreover, comparative genomic approaches are providing insights into speciation events while…

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