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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Serratia marcescens U36365, a green pigment–producing strain isolated from a patient with urinary tract infection.

Serratia marcescens is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with urinary and respiratory tract infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a green pigment-producing clinical strain, U36365, isolated from a hospital in Southern India. De novo assembly of PacBio long-read sequencing indicates that the U36365 genome consists of a chromosome of 5.12 Mbps and no plasmids. Copyright © 2016 Sahni et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome-directed analysis of prophage excision, host defence systems, and central fermentative metabolism in Clostridium pasteurianum.

Clostridium pasteurianum is emerging as a prospective host for the production of biofuels and chemicals, and has recently been shown to directly consume electric current. Despite this growing biotechnological appeal, the organism’s genetics and central metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we present a concurrent genome sequence for the C. pasteurianum type strain and provide extensive genomic analysis of the organism’s defence mechanisms and central fermentative metabolism. Next generation genome sequencing produced reads corresponding to spontaneous excision of a novel phage, designated f6013, which could be induced using mitomycin C and detected using PCR and transmission electron microscopy. Methylome analysis of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Neuraminidase A-exposed galactose promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation during colonization.

Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx. Herein we show that carbon availability is distinct between the nasopharynx and bloodstream of adult humans: glucose is absent from the nasopharynx, whereas galactose is abundant. We demonstrate that pneumococcal neuraminidase A (NanA), which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from host glycoproteins, exposed galactose on the surface of septal epithelial cells, thereby increasing its availability during colonization. We observed that S. pneumoniae mutants deficient in NanA and ß-galactosidase A (BgaA) failed to form biofilms in vivo despite normal biofilm-forming abilities in vitro Subsequently, we observed that glucose, sucrose, and fructose…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Deciphering the virulence factors of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium colombiense.

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) contains clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria worldwide and is the second largest medical complex in the Mycobacterium genus after the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. MAC comprises several species that are closely phylogenetically related but diverse regarding their host preference, course of disease, virulence and immune response. In this study we provided immunologic and virulence-related insights into the M. colombiense genome as a model of an opportunistic pathogen in the MAC. By using bioinformatic tools we found that M. colombiense has deletions in the genes involved in p-HBA/PDIM/PGL, PLC, SL-1 and HspX production, and loss of the ESX-1 locus. This information…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera strain AH16.

Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes. Copyright © 2016 Hasan et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain NC02, isolated from soil.

We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain NC02, isolated from soil in eastern Massachusetts. We assembled PacBio reads into a single closed contig with 132× mean coverage and then polished this contig using Illumina MiSeq reads, yielding a 6,890,566-bp sequence with 61.1% GC content. Copyright © 2018 Cerra et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli ML35.

We report here the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli strain ML35. We assembled PacBio reads into a single closed contig with 169× mean coverage and then polished this contig using Illumina MiSeq reads, yielding a 4,918,774-bp sequence with 50.8% GC content. Copyright © 2018 Casale et al.

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