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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome Sequences and Methylation Patterns of Natrinema versiforme BOL5-4 and Natrinema pallidum BOL6-1, Two Extremely Halophilic Archaea from a Bolivian Salt Mine.

Two extremely halophilic archaea, namely, Natrinema versiforme BOL5-4 and Natrinema pallidum BOL6-1, were isolated from a Bolivian salt mine and their genomes sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. The GC-rich genomes of BOL5-4 and BOL6-1 were 4.6 and 3.8 Mbp, respectively, with large chromosomes and multiple megaplasmids. Genome annotation was incorporated into HaloWeb and methylation patterns incorporated into REBASE.Copyright © 2019 DasSarma et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Methylomes of Two Extremely Halophilic Archaea Species, Haloarcula marismortui and Haloferax mediterranei.

The genomes of two extremely halophilic Archaea species, Haloarcula marismortui and Haloferax mediterranei, were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. The ~4-Mbp genomes are GC rich with multiple large plasmids and two 4-methyl-cytosine patterns. Methyl transferases were incorporated into the Restriction Enzymes Database (REBASE), and gene annotation was incorporated into the Haloarchaeal Genomes Database (HaloWeb).Copyright © 2019 DasSarma et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of Halocella sp. Strain SP3-1, an Extremely Halophilic, Glycoside Hydrolase- and Bacteriocin-Producing Bacterium Isolated from a Salt Evaporation Pond.

Halocella sp. strain SP3-1, a cellulose-degrading bacterium, was isolated from a hypersaline evaporation pond in Thailand. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of strain SP3-1. This species has a genome size of 4,035,760 bases, and the genome contains several genes encoding cellulose, hemicellulose, starch-degrading enzymes, and bacteriocins.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Harnessing long-read amplicon sequencing to uncover NRPS and Type I PKS gene sequence diversity in polar desert soils.

The severity of environmental conditions at Earth’s frigid zones present attractive opportunities for microbial biomining due to their heightened potential as reservoirs for novel secondary metabolites. Arid soil microbiomes within the Antarctic and Arctic circles are remarkably rich in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, bacterial phyla known to be prolific producers of natural products. Yet the diversity of secondary metabolite genes within these cold, extreme environments remain largely unknown. Here, we employed amplicon sequencing using PacBio RS II, a third generation long-read platform, to survey over 200 soils spanning twelve east Antarctic and high Arctic sites for natural product-encoding genes, specifically targeting…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Into the Thermus Mobilome: Presence, Diversity and Recent Activities of Insertion Sequences Across Thermus spp.

A high level of transposon-mediated genome rearrangement is a common trait among microorganisms isolated from thermal environments, probably contributing to the extraordinary genomic plasticity and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) observed in these habitats. In this work, active and inactive insertion sequences (ISs) spanning the sequenced members of the genus Thermus were characterized, with special emphasis on three T. thermophilus strains: HB27, HB8, and NAR1. A large number of full ISs and fragments derived from different IS families were found, concentrating within megaplasmids present in most isolates. Potentially active ISs were identified through analysis of transposase integrity, and domestication-related transposition events…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete genome sequence of Salinigranum rubrum GX10T, an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a marine solar saltern

Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, microbes inhabiting hypersaline environments have been investigated largely based on genomic characteristics. Salinigranum rubrum GX10T, the type species of the genus Salinigranum belonging to the euryarchaeal family Haloferacaceae, was isolated from the brine of Gangxi marine solar saltern near Weihai, China. Similar with most members of the class Halobacteria, S. rubrum GX10T is an extreme halophile requiring at least 1.5?M NaCl for growth and 3.1?M NaCl for optimum growth. We sequenced and annotated the complete genome of S. rubrum GX10T, which was found to be 4,973,118?bp and comprise…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Whole-Genome Analysis of Halomonas sp. Soap Lake #7 Reveals It Possesses Putative Mrp Antiporter Operon Groups 1 and 2.

The genus Halomonas possesses bacteria that are halophilic or halotolerant and exhibit a wide range of pH tolerance. The genome of Halomonas sp. Soap Lake #7 was sequenced to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms for salt and pH tolerance in this genus. The bacterium’s genome was found to possess two complete multiple resistance and pH antiporter systems, Group 1 and Group 2. This is the first report of both multiple resistance and pH antiporter Groups 1 and 2 in the genome of a haloalkaliphilic bacterium. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Isolation, cloning and characterization of an azoreductase and the effect of salinity on its expression in a halophilic bacterium.

Understanding the molecular mechanisms of azo dye decolorization is important for the development of effective bioremediation for textile-colored wastewater. A halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. strain GT was isolated, which could degrade the azo dye Acid Brilliant Scarlet GR at 10% NaCl. The complete genome sequence of this strain was obtained using the PacBio RS II platform. Genome annotation revealed that four proteins are related to decolorization of azo dyes, such as azoreductase, laccases, benzene 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. The putative azoreductase gene of Halomonas sp. strain GT responsible for the decolorization of azo dye in high salt environment was isolated.…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Identification of plasmid encoded osmoregulatory genes from halophilic bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of halophytes.

Bacterial plasmids carry genes that code for additional traits such as osmoregulation, CO2 fixation, antibiotic and heavy metal resistance, root nodulation and nitrogen fixation. The main objective of the current study was to identify plasmid-conferring osmoregulatory genes in bacteria isolated from rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils of halophytes (Salsola stocksii and Atriplex amnicola). More than 55% of halophilic bacteria from the rhizosphere and 70% from non-rhizospheric soils were able to grow at 3?M salt concentrations. All the strains showed optimum growth at 1.5-3.0?M NaCl. Bacterial strains from the Salsola rhizosphere showed maximum (31%) plasmid elimination during curing experiments as compared to…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The complete genome sequence of the denitrifying bacterium Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1 isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment

The general features and genome characteristics of the denitrifying bacterium Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1, isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment, are described. Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1 uses NO3- or NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source to grow at low temperatures. The strain can grow at a wide range of temperatures (0–30?°C) and NaCl concentration (15–90‰). The genome has one circular chromosome of 4,300,456?bp (57.64?mol%?G?+?C content), consisting of 4012 coding genes, including 50 tRNAs and three rRNA operons as 16S-23S-5S rRNA. On the basis of the KEGG analysis, strain Arc7-DN-1 encodes 43 proteins related to nitrogen metabolism, including a complete denitrifying pathway and an…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Comparative Genomics of Thiohalobacter thiocyanaticus HRh1T and Guyparkeria sp. SCN-R1, Halophilic Chemolithoautotrophic Sulfur-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria Capable of Using Thiocyanate as Energy Source.

The genomes of Thiohalobacter thiocyanaticus and Guyparkeria (formerly known as Halothiobacillus) sp. SCN-R1, two gammaproteobacterial halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) capable of thiocyanate oxidation via the “cyanate pathway”, have been analyzed with a particular focus on their thiocyanate-oxidizing potential and sulfur oxidation pathways. Both genomes encode homologs of the enzyme thiocyanate dehydrogenase (TcDH) that oxidizes thiocyanate via the “cyanate pathway” in members of the haloalkaliphilic SOB of the genus Thioalkalivibrio. However, despite the presence of conservative motives indicative of TcDH, the putative TcDH of the halophilic SOB have a low overall amino acid similarity to the Thioalkalivibrio enzyme, and also the…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Adaptive Strategies in a Poly-Extreme Environment: Differentiation of Vegetative Cells in Serratia ureilytica and Resistance to Extreme Conditions.

Poly-extreme terrestrial habitats are often used as analogs to extra-terrestrial environments. Understanding the adaptive strategies allowing bacteria to thrive and survive under these conditions could help in our quest for extra-terrestrial planets suitable for life and understanding how life evolved in the harsh early earth conditions. A prime example of such a survival strategy is the modification of vegetative cells into resistant resting structures. These differentiated cells are often observed in response to harsh environmental conditions. The environmental strain (strain Lr5/4) belonging to Serratia ureilytica was isolated from a geothermal spring in Lirima, Atacama Desert, Chile. The Atacama Desert is…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete genome sequence of the halophilic PHA-producing bacterium Halomonas sp. SF2003: insights into its biotechnological potential.

A halophilic Gram-negative eubacterium was isolated from the Iroise Sea and identified as an efficient producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). The strain, designated SF2003, was found to belong to the Halomonas genus on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Previous biochemical tests indicated that the Halomonas sp. strain SF2003 is capable of supporting various culture conditions which sometimes can be constraining for marine strains. This versatility could be of great interest for biotechnological applications. Therefore, a complete bacterial genome sequencing and de novo assembly were performed using a PacBio RSII sequencer and Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process software in order…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome sequence and transcriptomic profiles of a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas agarivorans Hao 2018.

Members of the marine genus Pseudoalteromonas have attracted great interest because of their ability to produce a large number of biologically active substances. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas agarivorans Hao 2018, a strain isolated from an abalone breeding environment, using second-generation Illumina and third-generation PacBio sequencing technologies. Illumina sequencing offers high quality and short reads, while PacBio technology generates long reads. The scaffolds of the two platforms were assembled to yield a complete genome sequence that included two circular chromosomes and one circular plasmid. Transcriptomic data for Pseudoalteromonas were not available. We therefore collected comprehensive RNA-seq…

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