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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of a subdivision 6 Acidobacterium strain.

Although ubiquitous and abundant in soils, acidobacteria have mostly escaped isolation and remain poorly investigated. Only a few cultured representatives and just eight genomes of subdivisions 1, 3, and 4 are available to date. Here, we determined the complete genome sequence of strain HEG_-6_39, the first genome of Acidobacterium subdivision 6. Copyright © 2016 Huang et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

CoLoRMap: Correcting Long Reads by Mapping short reads.

Second generation sequencing technologies paved the way to an exceptional increase in the number of sequenced genomes, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. However, short reads are difficult to assemble and often lead to highly fragmented assemblies. The recent developments in long reads sequencing methods offer a promising way to address this issue. However, so far long reads are characterized by a high error rate, and assembling from long reads require a high depth of coverage. This motivates the development of hybrid approaches that leverage the high quality of short reads to correct errors in long reads.We introduce CoLoRMap, a hybrid method…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the characterization of a crude oil degrading bacterial strain: Pedobacter steynii DX4

Pedobacter steynii DX4, isolated from Qinghai-Tibet plateau, exhibited capability to effectively degrade crude oil at low temperature. In order to illustrate its biodegradation mechanism, whole genome and transcriptome sequencing were performed. It is the first genome of crude oil degrading strain in Pedobacter genus. The P. steynii DX4 genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,581,659 bp with an average G+C content of 41.31% and encodes 5464 genes in all. GIs were predicted and comparison analysis was performed between relative species. Genome annotation predicted several hydrocarbon oxygenases, chemotaxis proteins and biosurfactant synthetases. The transcriptional sequences profiled a lot of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Assembly of the draft genome of buckwheat and its applications in identifying agronomically useful genes.

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench; 2n = 2x = 16) is a nutritionally dense annual crop widely grown in temperate zones. To accelerate molecular breeding programmes of this important crop, we generated a draft assembly of the buckwheat genome using short reads obtained by next-generation sequencing (NGS), and constructed the Buckwheat Genome DataBase. After assembling short reads, we determined 387,594 scaffolds as the draft genome sequence (FES_r1.0). The total length of FES_r1.0 was 1,177,687,305 bp, and the N50 of the scaffolds was 25,109 bp. Gene prediction analysis revealed 286,768 coding sequences (CDSs; FES_r1.0_cds) including those related to transposable elements. The total…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of human pathogen Kosakonia cowanii type strain 888-76T.

Kosakonia cowanii type strain 888-76T is a human pathogen which was originally isolated from blood as NIH group 42. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of K. cowanii 888-76T. 888-76T has 1 chromosome and 2 plasmids with a total genome size of 4,857,567bp and C+G 56.15%. This genome sequence will not only help us to understand the virulence features of K. cowanii 888-76T but also provide us the useful information for the study of evolution of Kosakonia genus. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Construction of two whole genome radiation hybrid panels for dromedary (Camelus dromedarius): 5000RAD and 15000RAD.

The availability of genomic resources including linkage information for camelids has been very limited. Here, we describe the construction of a set of two radiation hybrid (RH) panels (5000RADand 15000RAD) for the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) as a permanent genetic resource for camel genome researchers worldwide. For the 5000RADpanel, a total of 245 female camel-hamster radiation hybrid clones were collected, of which 186 were screened with 44 custom designed marker loci distributed throughout camel genome. The overall mean retention frequency (RF) of the final set of 93 hybrids was 47.7%. For the 15000RADpanel, 238 male dromedary-hamster radiation hybrid clones were collected,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Current advances in genome sequencing of common wheat and its ancestral species

Common wheat is an important and widely cultivated food crop throughout the world. Much progress has been made in regard to wheat genome sequencing in the last decade. Starting from the sequencing of single chromosomes/chromosome arms whole genome sequences of common wheat and its diploid and tetraploid ancestors have been decoded along with the development of sequencing and assembling technologies. In this review, we give a brief summary on international progress in wheat genome sequencing, and mainly focus on reviewing the effort and contributions made by Chinese scientists.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Ten steps to get started in Genome Assembly and Annotation.

As a part of the ELIXIR-EXCELERATE efforts in capacity building, we present here 10 steps to facilitate researchers getting started in genome assembly and genome annotation. The guidelines given are broadly applicable, intended to be stable over time, and cover all aspects from start to finish of a general assembly and annotation project. Intrinsic properties of genomes are discussed, as is the importance of using high quality DNA. Different sequencing technologies and generally applicable workflows for genome assembly are also detailed. We cover structural and functional annotation and encourage readers to also annotate transposable elements, something that is often omitted…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Improved draft genome sequence of a monoteliosporic culture of the karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) pathogen of wheat.

Karnal bunt of wheat is an internationally quarantined fungal pathogen disease caused by Tilletia indica and affects the international commercial seed trade of wheat. We announce here the first improved draft genome assembly of a monoteliosporic culture of the Tilletia indica fungus, consisting of 787 scaffolds with an approximate total genome size of 31.83 Mbp, which is more accurate and near to complete than the previous version. Copyright © 2018 Kumar et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo genome assembly of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) developed through a combination of linked-reads and long-read technologies

Long-read sequencing has greatly contributed to the generation of high quality assemblies, albeit at a high cost. It is also not always clear how to combine sequencing platforms. We sequenced the genome of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), the most important pest in the olive fruits agribusiness industry, using Illumina short-reads, mate-pairs, 10x Genomics linked-reads, Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). The 10x linked-reads assembly gave the most contiguous assembly with an N50 of 2.16 Mb. Scaffolding the linked-reads assembly using long-reads from ONT gave a more contiguous assembly with scaffold N50 of 4.59 Mb. We also…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Draft Genome of the MD-2 Pineapple

The main challenge in assembling plant genome is its ploidy level, repeats content, and polymorphism. The second-generation sequencing delivered the throughput and the accuracy that is crucial to whole-genome sequencing but insufficient and remained challenging for some plant species. It is known that genomes produced by next-gen- eration sequencing produced small contigs that would inflate the number of annotated genes (Varshney et al. 2011) and missed on the transposable elements that are abun- dant in plant genome due to their repetitive nature (Michael and Jackson 2013).

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