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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genomic sequence of a novel cold-adapted bacterium, Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil.

Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from the petroleum-contaminated soil of the Qaidam Basin, can use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy at 20 °C. The genome of P. maritimus strain Y42 has been sequenced to provide information on its properties. Genomic analysis shows that the genome of strain Y42 contains one circular DNA chromosome with a size of 3,718,896 bp and a GC content of 48.8%, and three plasmids (329,482; 89,073; and 12,282 bp). Although the strain Y42 did not show a remarkably higher ability in degrading crude oil than other oil-degrading bacteria, the existence of strain Y42 played a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic insights into date palm origins.

With the development of next-generation sequencing technology, the amount of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) genomic data has grown rapidly and yielded new insights into this species and its origins. Here, we review advances in understanding of the evolutionary history of the date palm, with a particular emphasis on what has been learned from the analysis of genomic data. We first record current genomic resources available for date palm including genome assemblies and resequencing data. We discuss new insights into its domestication and diversification history based on these improved genomic resources. We further report recent discoveries such as the existence…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium Chryseobacterium indologenes PgBE177, isolated from Panax quinquefolius.

Chryseobacterium indologenes PgBE177, isolated from the root tissue of a 4-year-old Panax quinquefolius plant, showed antagonistic activity against Pseu- domonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, a bacterial pathogen. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of C. indologenes PgBE177. The bacterium contains bacteri- ocin gene clusters and has the potential to stimulate plant growth.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome-wide characterization and phylogenetic analysis of GSK gene family in three species of cotton: evidence for a role of some GSKs in fiber development and responses to stress

Background: The glycogen synthase kinase 3/shaggy kinase (GSK3) is a serine/threonine kinase with important roles in animals. Although GSK3 genes have been studied for more than 30years, plant GSK genes have been studied only since the last decade. Previous research has confirmed that plant GSK genes are involved in diverse processes, including floral development, brassinosteroid signaling, and responses to abiotic stresses. Result: In this study, 20, 15 (including 5 different transcripts) and 10 GSK genes were identified in G. hirsutum, G. raimondii and G. arboreum, respectively. A total of 65 genes from Arabidopsis, rice, and cotton were classified into 4…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Velez bacillusL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role evaluation and all Genome Analysis

[Objective] Clear Velez bacillus(Bacillus S rDNA Sequence) L-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role clear Bacteria L-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability and may be of Antagonistic mechanism. [Methods] by in vitro determination, living determination and pathogenic bacteria mycelium morphology observation evaluation StrainL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of antagonistic activity. To pear Botrytis cinerea bacteria for try pathogenic bacteria use Oxford Cup method determination StrainL-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability. UsePacbio rsiiThree generations sequencing technology determinationL-1Of all gene sequence will all gene sequence and gene protein sequence databaseBLASTComparison Analysis prediction StrainL-1May be of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Hardwood tree genomics: Unlocking woody plant biology.

Woody perennial angiosperms (i.e., hardwood trees) are polyphyletic in origin and occur in most angiosperm orders. Despite their independent origins, hardwoods have shared physiological, anatomical, and life history traits distinct from their herbaceous relatives. New high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have provided access to numerous woody plant genomes beyond the early reference genomes of Populus and Eucalyptus, references that now include willow and oak, with pecan and chestnut soon to follow. Genomic studies within these diverse and undomesticated species have successfully linked genes to ecological, physiological, and developmental traits directly. Moreover, comparative genomic approaches are providing insights into speciation events while…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Reference genes for RT-qPCR normalisation in different tissues, developmental stages and stress conditions of Hypericum perforatum

Hypericum perforatum is a widely known medicinal herb used mostly as a remedy for depression because of its abundant secondary metabolites. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is an optimized method for the efficient and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. In general, reference genes are used in qRT-PCR analysis because of their known or suspected housekeeping roles. However, their expression level cannot be assumed to remain stable under all possible experimental conditions. Thus, the identification of high quality reference genes is very necessary for the interpretation of qRT-PCR data. In this study, we investigated the expression of fourteen candidate genes, including…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-Genome and Expression Analyses of Bamboo Aquaporin Genes Reveal Their Functions Involved in Maintaining Diurnal Water Balance in Bamboo Shoots.

Water supply is essential for maintaining normal physiological function during the rapid growth of bamboo. Aquaporins (AQPs) play crucial roles in water transport for plant growth and development. Although 26 PeAQPs in bamboo have been reported, the aquaporin-led mechanism of maintaining diurnal water balance in bamboo shoots remains unclear. In this study, a total of 63 PeAQPs were identified, based on the updated genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis), including 22 PePIPs, 20 PeTIPs, 17 PeNIPs, and 4 PeSIPs. All of the PeAQPs were differently expressed in 26 different tissues of moso bamboo, based on RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data. The…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Draft Genome of the MD-2 Pineapple

The main challenge in assembling plant genome is its ploidy level, repeats content, and polymorphism. The second-generation sequencing delivered the throughput and the accuracy that is crucial to whole-genome sequencing but insufficient and remained challenging for some plant species. It is known that genomes produced by next-gen- eration sequencing produced small contigs that would inflate the number of annotated genes (Varshney et al. 2011) and missed on the transposable elements that are abun- dant in plant genome due to their repetitive nature (Michael and Jackson 2013).

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