April 21, 2020  |  

Emergence of an Escherichia coli strain co-harbouring mcr-1 and blaNDM-9 from a urinary tract infection in Taiwan.

Multidrug-resistant bacteria have become a serious threat worldwide. In particular, the coexistence of carbapenemase genes and mcr-1 leaves few available treatment options. Here we report a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolate harbouring both mcr-1 and blaNDM-9 from a patient with a urinary tract infection.Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance genes of the E. coli isolate were characterised. Furthermore, the assembled genome sequences of mcr-1- and blaNDM-9-carrying plasmids were determined and comparative genetic analysis with closely related plasmids was carried out.Three contigs were assembled comprising the E. coli chromosome and two plasmids harbouring mcr-1 (p5CRE51-MCR-1) and blaNDM-9 (p5CRE51-NDM-9), respectively. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the two antimicrobial resistance genes are located on individual plasmids.The emergence of coexistence of carbapenemase genes and mcr-1 in Enterobacteriaceae highlights a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy.Copyright © 2018 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


April 21, 2020  |  

Characterization of NDM-5- and CTX-M-55-coproducing Escherichia coli GSH8M-2 isolated from the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Tokyo Bay.

New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase (NDM)-5-producing Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in rivers, sewage, and effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Environmental contamination due to discharged effluents is of particular concern as NDM variants may be released into waterways, thereby posing a risk to humans. In this study, we collected effluent samples from a WWTP discharged into a canal in Tokyo Bay, Japan.Testing included the complete genome sequencing of Escherichia coli GSH8M-2 isolated from the effluent as well as a gene network analysis.The complete genome sequencing of GSH8M-2 revealed that it was an NDM-5-producing E. coli strain sequence type ST542, which carries multiple antimicrobial resistance genes for ß-lactams, quinolone, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, florfenicol/chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and fosfomycin. The blaNDM-5 gene was found in the IncX3 replicon plasmid pGSH8M-2-4. Gene network analysis using 142 IncX3 plasmid sequences suggested that pGSH8M-2-4 is related to both clinical isolates of  E. coli and Klebsiella species in Eastern Asia. GSH8M-2 also carries the blaCTX-M-55 gene in IncX1 plasmid pGSH8M-2-3.This is the first report of environmental NDM-5-producing E. coli isolated from a WWTP in Japan. NDM-5 detection is markedly increasing in veterinary and clinical settings, suggesting that dual ß-lactamases, such as NDM-5 and CTX-M-55, might be acquired through multiple steps in environment settings. Environmental contamination through WWTP effluents that contain producers of NDM variants could be an emerging potential health hazard. Thus, regular monitoring of WWTP effluents is important for the detection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that may be released into the waterways and nearby communities.


April 21, 2020  |  

Dissemination of multiple carbapenem resistance genes in an in vitro gut model simulating the human colon.

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) pose a major global health risk. Mobile genetic elements account for much of the increasing CPE burden.To investigate CPE colonization and the impact of antibiotic exposure on subsequent resistance gene dissemination within the gut microbiota using a model to simulate the human colon.Gut models seeded with CPE-negative human faeces [screened with BioMérieux chromID® CARBA-SMART (Carba-Smart), Cepheid Xpert® Carba-R assay (XCR)] were inoculated with distinct carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains (KPC, NDM) and challenged with imipenem or piperacillin/tazobactam then meropenem. Resistant populations were enumerated daily on selective agars (Carba-Smart); CPE genes were confirmed by PCR (XCR, Check-Direct CPE Screen for BD MAX™). CPE gene dissemination was tracked using PacBio long-read sequencing.CPE populations increased during inoculation, plateauing at ~105?log10?cfu/mL in both models and persisting throughout the experiments (>65?days), with no evidence of CPE ‘washout’. After antibiotic administration, there was evidence of interspecies plasmid transfer of blaKPC-2 (111742?bp IncFII/IncR plasmid, 99% identity to pKpQIL-D2) and blaNDM-1 (~170?kb IncFIB/IncFII plasmid), and CPE populations rose from <0.01% to >45% of the total lactose-fermenting populations in the KPC model. Isolation of a blaNDM-1K. pneumoniae with one chromosomal single-nucleotide variant compared with the inoculated strain indicated clonal expansion within the model. Antibiotic administration exposed a previously undetected K. pneumoniae encoding blaOXA-232 (KPC model).CPE exposure can lead to colonization, clonal expansion and resistance gene transfer within intact human colonic microbiota. Furthermore, under antibiotic selective pressure, new resistant populations emerge, emphasizing the need to control exposure to antimicrobials. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


April 21, 2020  |  

Characterization of a blaIMP-4-carrying plasmid from Enterobacter cloacae of swine origin.

To characterize an MDR blaIMP-4-harbouring plasmid from Enterobacter cloacae EC62 of swine origin in China.Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 from E. cloacae EC62 was transferred by conjugation via filter mating into Escherichia coli J53. Plasmid DNA was extracted from an E. coli J53 transconjugant and sequenced using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. MIC values for both the isolate EC62 and the transconjugant were determined using the broth microdilution and agar dilution methods. Plasmid stability in both the isolate EC62 and the transconjugant was assessed through a series of passages on antibiotic-free media.Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 is 314351?bp in length, encodes 369 predicted proteins and harbours a novel class 1 integron carrying blaIMP-4 and a group II intron. The blaIMP-4-bearing plasmid belongs to the IncHI2/ST1 incompatibility group. Sequence analysis showed that pIMP-4-EC62 carries four MDR regions and several gene clusters encoding heavy metal resistance. Plasmid pIMP-4-EC62 was stably maintained in both the E. cloacae EC62 isolate and the transconjugant E. coli J53-pIMP-4-EC62 in the absence of selective pressure. Analysis of the evolutionary relatedness of selected IncHI2 plasmids indicates that ST1-type plasmids are key carriers of carbapenemase genes among IncHI2 plasmids.pIMP-4-EC62 represents the first fully sequenced IncHI2-type blaIMP-4-harbouring plasmid from E. cloacae in China. Co-location of blaIMP-4 with other resistance genes on an MDR plasmid is likely to further accelerate the dissemination of blaIMP-4 by co-selection among bacteria from humans, animals and the environment under the selective pressure of other antimicrobial agents, heavy metals and disinfectants. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


April 21, 2020  |  

Deciphering bacterial epigenomes using modern sequencing technologies.

Prokaryotic DNA contains three types of methylation: N6-methyladenine, N4-methylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine. The lack of tools to analyse the frequency and distribution of methylated residues in bacterial genomes has prevented a full understanding of their functions. Now, advances in DNA sequencing technology, including single-molecule, real-time sequencing and nanopore-based sequencing, have provided new opportunities for systematic detection of all three forms of methylated DNA at a genome-wide scale and offer unprecedented opportunities for achieving a more complete understanding of bacterial epigenomes. Indeed, as the number of mapped bacterial methylomes approaches 2,000, increasing evidence supports roles for methylation in regulation of gene expression, virulence and pathogen-host interactions.


April 21, 2020  |  

Development of Tigecycline Resistance in Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 147 via AcrAB Overproduction Mediated by Replacement of the ramA Promoter.

Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae 2297, isolated from a patient treated with tigecycline for pneumonia, developed tigecycline resistance, in contrast to carbapenem-resistant isolate 1215, which was collected four months prior to the 2297 isolate. Mechanisms underlying tigecycline resistance were elucidated for the clinical isolates.The tigecycline minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the broth microdilution method, with or without phenylalanine-arginine ß-naphthylamide (PABN), and whole-genome sequencing was carried out by single-molecule real-time sequencing. The expression levels of the genes acrA, oqxA, ramA, rarA, and rpoB were determined by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR.Both isolates presented identical antibiograms, except for tigecycline, which showed an MIC of 0.5 mg/L in 1215 and 2 mg/L in 2297. The addition of PABN to tigecycline-resistant 2297 caused a four-fold decrease in the tigecycline MIC to 0.5 mg/L, although acrA expression (encoding the AcrAB efflux pump) was upregulated by 2.5 fold and ramA expression (encoding the pump activator RamA) was upregulated by 1.4 fold. We identified a 6,096-bp fragment insertion flanking direct TATAT repeats that disrupted the romA gene located upstream of ramA in the chromosome of K. pneumoniae 2297; the insertion led the ramA gene promoter replacement resulting in stronger activation of the gene.The K. pneumoniae isolate developed tigecycline resistance during tigecycline treatment. It was related to the overexpression of the AcrAB resistance-nodulation-cell division efflux system due to promoter replacement. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.


April 21, 2020  |  

A novel plasmid carrying carbapenem-resistant gene blaKPC-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

A carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1011 (ST463) was isolated from a patient in a surgical intensive care unit. PCR detection showed that PA1011 carried the blaKPC-2 gene. A plasmid was isolated and sequenced using the Illumina NextSeq 500 and PacBio RSII sequencing platforms. The plasmid was named pPA1011 and carried the carbapenem-resistant gene blaKPC-2. pPA1011 was a 62,793 bp in length with an average G+C content of 58.8%. It was identified as a novel plasmid and encoded a novel genetic environment of blaKPC-2 gene (?IS6-Tn3-ISKpn8-blaKPC-2-ISKpn6-IS26).


April 21, 2020  |  

Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at US Emerging Infections Program Sites, 2015.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to many antimicrobial drugs, making carbapenems crucial in clinical management. During July-October 2015 in the United States, we piloted laboratory-based surveillance for carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) at sentinel facilities in Georgia, New Mexico, Oregon, and Tennessee, and population-based surveillance in Monroe County, NY. An incident case was the first P. aeruginosa isolate resistant to antipseudomonal carbapenems from a patient in a 30-day period from any source except the nares, rectum or perirectal area, or feces. We found 294 incident cases among 274 patients. Cases were most commonly identified from respiratory sites (120/294; 40.8%) and urine (111/294; 37.8%); most (223/280; 79.6%) occurred in patients with healthcare facility inpatient stays in the prior year. Genes encoding carbapenemases were identified in 3 (2.3%) of 129 isolates tested. The burden of CRPA was high at facilities under surveillance, but carbapenemase-producing CRPA were rare.


April 21, 2020  |  

Whole genome assembly and functional portrait of hypervirulent extensively drug-resistant NDM-1 and KPC-2 co-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae of capsular serotype K2 and ST86.

To characterize an emergent carbapenem-resistant hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-hvKP) strain, NUHL30457, which co-produces NDM-1 and KPC-2 carbapenemases.We performed WGS analysis on a clinical carbapenemase-producing hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (CP-hvKP) strain NUHL30457. Sequence data were analysed using comparative genomics and phylogenetics. WGS was used to perform MLST, capsular genotyping and identification of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes. The virulence of NUHL30457 was analysed by serum killing assay, neutrophil phagocytosis and mouse lethality assay.The NUHL30457 strain was carbapenem resistant and belonged to ST86 and serotype K2. A significant increase in resistance to serum killing and antiphagocytosis was found in the NUHL30457 strain compared with the reference strain. The murine lethality assay showed an LD50 of 2.5?×?102?cfu for the NUHL30457 strain, indicating hypervirulence. WGS revealed that NUHL30457 has a single 5.3?Mb chromosome (57.53% G?+?C content) and four plasmids in the range 49.2-215.7?kb. The incompatibility group (Inc)N plasmid p30457-4 carried the blaNDM-1 and qnrS1 genes. The IncFII(K) plasmid p30457-3 also carried an array of resistance elements, including blaCTX-M-65, blaTEM-1 and blaKPC-2. The IncHI1/IncFIB plasmid p30457-1, which carried virulence genes, was identical to a pLVPK plasmid reported previously.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to isolate an ST86 hvKP strain that co-produces NDM-1 and KPC-2 carbapenemase. Further investigation is required to reinforce our understanding of the epidemiology and virulence mechanisms of this clinically significant CP-hvKP. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


April 21, 2020  |  

Real time monitoring of Aeromonas salmonicida evolution in response to successive antibiotic therapies in a commercial fish farm.

Our ability to predict evolutionary trajectories of pathogens in response to antibiotic pressure is one of the promising leverage to fight against the present antibiotic resistance worldwide crisis. Yet, few studies tackled this question in situ at the outbreak level, due to the difficulty to link a given pathogenic clone evolution with its precise antibiotic exposure over time. In this study, we monitored the real-time evolution of an Aeromonas salmonicida clone in response to successive antibiotic and vaccine therapies in a commercial fish farm. The clone was responsible for a four-year outbreak of furunculosis within a Recirculating Aquaculture System Salmo salar farm in China, and we reconstructed the precise tempo of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) acquisition events during this period. The resistance profile provided by the acquired MGEs closely mirrored the antibiotics used to treat the outbreak, and we evidenced that two subclonal groups developed similar resistances although unrelated MGE acquisitions. Finally, we also demonstrated the efficiency of vaccination in outbreak management and its positive effect on antibiotic resistance prevalence. Our study provides unprecedented knowledge critical to understand evolutionary trajectories of resistant pathogens outside the laboratory. © 2019 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


April 21, 2020  |  

Plasmid analysis of Escherichia coli isolates from South Korea co-producing NDM-5 and OXA-181 carbapenemases.

Recently, Escherichia coli isolates co-producing New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase (NDM)-5 and oxacillinase (OXA)-181 were identified in a tertiary-care hospital of South Korea. Isolate CC1702-1 was collected from urine in January 2017 and isolate CC1706-1 was recovered from a transtracheal aspirate of a hospitalized patient in May 2017. Carbapenemase genes were identified by multiplex PCR and sequencing, and whole genome sequencing was performed subsequently using the PacBio RSII system. Both E. coli isolates belonged to the same clone (ST410) and were resistant to all ß-lactams including carbapenems. We obtained whole plasmid sequences of the isolates: pCC1702-NDM-5 from CC1702-1 and pCC1706-NDM-5 and pCC1706-OXA-181 from CC1706-1. The two E. coli isolates belonged to the same clone (ST410) and they were completely resistant to all ß-lactams, as well as carbapenems. Two blaNDM-5-harboring plasmids belonged to the same incompatibility group, IncFIA/B, and consisted of 79,613?bp and 111,890?bp with 87 and 130 coding sequences, respectively. The genetic structures of the two blaNDM-5-bearing plasmids, which were distinct from the blaNDM-5-bearing plasmids from the Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates previously transmitted from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to South Korea, differed from each other. While pCC1702-NDM-5 showed high degree of identity with the plasmid from a multidrug-resistant isolate of Citrobacter fruendii P5571 found in China, pCC1706-NDM-5 was very similar to the plasmid from a multidrug-resistant isolate of E. coli AMA1176 found in Denmark. pCC1706-OXA-181, which was a 51?kb, self-transmissible IncX3 plasmid, was identical to the E. coli plasmids pAMA1167-OXA-181 from Denmark and pOXA-181-WCHEC14828 from China. Plasmids harboring blaNDM-5 in E. coli isolates might not be transferred from K. pneumoniae isolates co-producing NDM-5 and OXA-181. They probably originated from multiple sources.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


April 21, 2020  |  

Sequencing and Genomic Diversity Analysis of IncHI5 Plasmids.

IncHI plasmids could be divided into five different subgroups IncHI1-5. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequences of seven blaIMP- or blaVIM-carrying IncHI5 plasmids from Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. quasipneumoniae, and K. variicola were determined and compared in detail with all the other four available sequenced IncHI5 plasmids. These plasmids carried conserved IncHI5 backbones composed of repHI5B and a repFIB-like gene (replication), parABC (partition), and tra1 (conjugal transfer). Integration of a number of accessory modules, through horizontal gene transfer, at various sites of IncHI5 backbones resulted in various deletions of surrounding backbone regions and thus considerable diversification of IncHI5 backbones. Among the accessory modules were three kinds of resistance accessory modules, namely Tn10 and two antibiotic resistance islands designated ARI-A and ARI-B. These two islands, inserted at two different fixed sites (one island was at one site and the other was at a different site) of IncHI5 backbones, were derived from the prototype Tn3-family transposons Tn1696 and Tn6535, respectively, and could be further discriminated as various intact transposons and transposon-like structures. The ARI-A or ARI-B islands from different IncHI5 plasmids carried distinct profiles of antimicrobial resistance markers and associated mobile elements, and complex events of transposition and homologous recombination accounted for assembly of these islands. The carbapenemase genes blaIMP-4, blaIMP-38 and blaVIM-1 were identified within various class 1 integrons from ARI-A or ARI-B of the seven plasmids sequenced in this study. Data presented here would provide a deeper insight into diversification and evolution history of IncHI5 plasmids.


April 21, 2020  |  

Resistance mechanisms and population structure of highly drug resistant Klebsiella in Pakistan during the introduction of the carbapenemase NDM-1.

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major threat to public health with the emergence of isolates resistant to most, if not all, useful antibiotics. We present an in-depth analysis of 178 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae collected from patients resident in a region of Pakistan, during the period 2010-2012, when the now globally-distributed carbapenemase bla-NDM-1 was being acquired by Klebsiella. We observed two dominant lineages, but neither the overall resistance profile nor virulence-associated factors, explain their evolutionary success. Phenotypic analysis of resistance shows few differences between the acquisition of resistance genes and the phenotypic resistance profile, including beta-lactam antibiotics that were used to treat ESBL-positive strains. Resistance against these drugs could be explained by inhibitor-resistant beta-lactamase enzymes, carbapenemases or ampC type beta-lactamases, at least one of which was detected in most, but not all relevant strains analysed. Complete genomes for six selected strains are reported, these provide detailed insights into the mobile elements present in these isolates during the initial spread of NDM-1. The unexplained success of some lineages within this pool of highly resistant strains, and the discontinuity between phenotypic resistance and genotype at the macro level, indicate that intrinsic mechanisms contribute to competitive advantage and/or resistance.


April 21, 2020  |  

A Phage-Like Plasmid Carrying blaKPC-2 Gene in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Background: Lateral gene transfer plays a central role in the dissemination of carbapenem resistance in bacterial pathogens associated with nosocomial infections, mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite their clinical significance, there is little information regarding the mobile genetic elements and mechanism of acquisition and propagation of lateral genes in P. aeruginosa, and they remain largely unknown. Objectives: The present study characterized the genetic context of blaKPC-2 in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strain BH9. Methods:Pseudomonas aeruginosa BH9 sequencing was performed using the long-read PacBio SMRT platform and the Ion Proton System. De novo assembly was carried out using the SMRT pipeline and Canu, and gene prediction and annotation were performed using Prokka and RAST. Results:Pseudomonas aeruginosa BH9 exhibited a 7.1 Mb circular chromosome. However, the blaKPC-2 gene is located in an additional contig composed by a small plasmid pBH6 from P. aeruginosa strain BH6 and several phage-related genes. Further analysis revealed that the beginning and end of the contig contain identical sequences, supporting a circular plasmid structure. This structure spans 41,087 bp, exhibiting all the Mu-like phage landmarks. In addition, 5-bp direct repeats (GGATG) flanking the pBH6 ends were found, strongly indicating integration of the Mu-like phage into the pBH6 plasmid. Mu phages are commonly found in P. aeruginosa. However, for the first time showing a potential impact in shaping the vehicles of the dissemination of antimicrobial (e.g., plasmid pBH6) resistance genes in the Pseudomonas genus. Conclusion: pBH6 captured the Mu-like Phage BH9, creating a co-integrate pBH6::Phage BH9, and this phage-plasmid complex may represent novel case of a phage-like plasmid.


April 21, 2020  |  

Identification of Diverse Integron and Plasmid Structures Carrying a Novel Carbapenemase Among Pseudomonas Species.

A novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase, called IMP-63, was identified in three clonally distinct strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and two strains of Pseudomonas putida isolated within a 4 year timeframe in three French hospitals. The blaIMP-63 gene that encodes this carbapenemase turned out to be located in the variable region of four integrons (In1297, In1574, In1573, and In1572) and to coexist with novel or rare gene cassettes (fosM, gcu170, gcuF1) and insertion elements (ISPsp7v, ISPa16v). All these integrons except one (In1574) were flanked by a copy of insertion sequence ISPa17 next to the orf6 putative gene, and were carried by non-conjugative plasmids (pNECK1, pROUSS1, pROUSS2, pROUE1). These plasmids exhibit unique modular structures and partial sequence homologies with plasmids previously identified in various non-fermenting environmental Gram-negative species. Lines of evidence suggest that ISPa17 promoted en bloc the transposition of IMP-63-encoding integrons on these different plasmids. As demonstrated by genotyping experiments, isolates of P. aeruginosa harboring the 28.9-kb plasmid pNECK1 and belonging to international “high-risk” clone ST308 were responsible for an outbreak in one hospital. Collectively, these data provide an insight into the complex and unpredictable routes of diffusion of some resistance determinants, here blaIMP-63, among Pseudomonas species.


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