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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence and annotation of the phytopathogenic Ralstonia pickettii (previously Burkholderia glumae) strain ICMP-8657.

Strain ICMP-8657 was formerly taxonomically classified as Burkholderia glumae and reported to be the producer of an antibacterial pyrazole derivative. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ICMP-8657, which failed to demonstrate the biosynthetic capacity to produce the stated antibacterial compound, leading to its taxonomic reclassification as Ralstonia pickettii ICMP-8657. Copyright © 2018 Paterson and Gross.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei sequence type 131 isolate MSHR1435, associated with a chronic melioidosis infection.

The Burkholderia pseudomallei isolate MSHR1435 is a fully virulent environmental sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate that is epidemiologically associated with a 17.5-year chronic melioidosis infection. The completed genome will serve as a reference for studies of environmental ecology, virulence, and chronic B. pseudomallei infections. Copyright © 2018 Sahl et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Short genome report of cellulose-producing commensal Escherichia coli 1094.

Bacterial surface colonization and biofilm formation often rely on the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix that mediates cell-cell and cell-surface contacts. In Escherichia coli and many Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria cellulose is often the main component of the extracellular matrix. Here we report the complete genome sequence of the cellulose producing strain E. coli 1094 and compare it with five other closely related genomes within E. coli phylogenetic group A. We present a comparative analysis of the regions encoding genes responsible for cellulose biosynthesis and discuss the changes that could have led to the loss of this important adaptive advantage…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of resistance genes of clinical Pannonibacter phragmitetus strain 31801 by complete genome sequencing.

To clarify the resistance mechanisms of Pannonibacter phragmitetus 31801, isolated from the blood of a liver abscess patient, at the genomic level, we performed whole genomic sequencing using a PacBio RS II single-molecule real-time long-read sequencer. Bioinformatic analysis of the resulting sequence was then carried out to identify any possible resistance genes. Analyses included Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches against the Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database, ResFinder analysis of the genome sequence, and Resistance Gene Identifier analysis within the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database. Prophages, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and other putative virulence factors were also identified using…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Achromobacter spanius type strain DSM 23806T, a pathogen isolated from human blood.

Achromobacter spanius is a newly described, non-fermenting, Gram-negative, coccoid pathogen isolated from human blood. Whole-genome sequencing of the A. spanius type strain was performed to investigate the mechanism of pathogenesis of this strain at a genomic level.The complete genome of A. spanius type strain DSM 23806T was sequenced using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing.The complete genome of DSM 23806T consists of one circular DNA chromosome of 6425783bp with a G+C content of 64.26%. The entire genome contains 5804 predicted coding sequences (CDS) and 55 tRNAs. Genomic island (GI) analysis showed that this strain encodes several important pathogenesis- and resistance-related genes.These…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Modular traits of the Rhizobiales root microbiota and their evolutionary relationship with symbiotic Rhizobia.

Rhizobia are a paraphyletic group of soil-borne bacteria that induce nodule organogenesis in legume roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen for plant growth. In non-leguminous plants, species from the Rhizobiales order define a core lineage of the plant microbiota, suggesting additional functional interactions with plant hosts. In this work, genome analyses of 1,314 Rhizobiales isolates along with amplicon studies of the root microbiota reveal the evolutionary history of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in this bacterial order. Key symbiosis genes were acquired multiple times, and the most recent common ancestor could colonize roots of a broad host range. In addition, root growth promotion is…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High- quality draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from fungus gardens grown by Trachymyrmex septentrionalis ants.

For their food source, Trachymyrmex septentrionalis ants raise symbiotic fungus gardens that contain bacteria whose functions are poorly understood. Here, we report the genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from these fungus gardens to better describe the ecology of these strains and their potential to produce secondary metabolites in this niche.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization and genome analysis of a phthalate esters-degrading strain Sphingobium yanoikuyae SHJ.

A bacterium capable of utilizing dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), and diisobuthyl phthalate (DIBP) as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from shallow aquifer sediments. The strain was identified as Sphingobium yanoikuyae SHJ based on morphological characteristics, 16S rDNA gene phylogeny, and whole genome average nucleotide identity (ANI). The degradation half-life of DBP with substrate concentration of 8.5 and 50.0 mg/L by strain SHJ was 99.7 and 101.4 hours, respectively. The optimum degradation rate of DBP by SHJ was observed at 30°C and weak alkaline (pH 7.5). Genome sequence of the strain SHJ showed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Agrobacterium pusense VsBac-Y9, a bacterial symbiont of the dark septate endophytic fungus Veronaeopsis simplex Y34 with potential for improving fungal colonization in roots.

A Rhizobium-related bacterium (Rhizobium sp. VsBac-Y9) is a symbiont living with the dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungus Veronaeopsis simplex Y34. Co-inoculation of Rhizobium sp. VsBac-Y9 with V. simplex Y34 improves the fungal colonization of tomato roots, resulting in a significant increase in aboveground biomass. This study sequenced the complete genome of this V. simplex-helper bacterium using the PacBio and Illumina MiSeq platforms. Hybrid assembly using SPAdes outputted a circular chromosome, a linear chromid, and a circular plasmid for a total genome 5,321,211 bp in size with a G?+?C content of 59.2%. Analysis of concatenated housekeeping genes (atpD-dnaK-groEL-lepA-recA-rpoB-thrE) and calculation of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Near-complete genome sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum T523, a phylotype I tomato phytopathogen isolated from the Philippines.

Ralstonia solanacearum strain T523 is the major phytopathogen causing tomato bacterial wilt in the Philippines. Here, we report the complete chromosome and draft megaplasmid genomes with predicted gene inventories supporting rhizo- sphere processes, extensive plant virulence effectors, and the production of bioac- tive signaling metabolites, such as ralstonin, micacocidin, and homoserine lactone.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genomic sequence of a novel cold-adapted bacterium, Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil.

Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from the petroleum-contaminated soil of the Qaidam Basin, can use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy at 20 °C. The genome of P. maritimus strain Y42 has been sequenced to provide information on its properties. Genomic analysis shows that the genome of strain Y42 contains one circular DNA chromosome with a size of 3,718,896 bp and a GC content of 48.8%, and three plasmids (329,482; 89,073; and 12,282 bp). Although the strain Y42 did not show a remarkably higher ability in degrading crude oil than other oil-degrading bacteria, the existence of strain Y42 played a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome analysis of Vallitalea guaymasensis strain L81 isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system.

Abyssivirga alkaniphila strain L81T, recently isolated from a black smoker biofilm at the Loki’s Castle hydrothermal vent field, was previously described as a mesophilic, obligately anaerobic heterotroph able to ferment carbohydrates, peptides, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The strain was classified as a new genus within the family Lachnospiraceae. Herein, its genome is analyzed and A. alkaniphila is reassigned to the genus Vallitalea as a new strain of V. guaymasensis, designated V. guaymasensis strain L81. The 6.4 Mbp genome contained 5651 protein encoding genes, whereof 4043 were given a functional prediction. Pathways for fermentation of mono-saccharides, di-saccharides, peptides, and amino acids were…

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