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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Penicillium purpurogenum Produces a Set of Endoxylanases: Identification, Heterologous Expression, and Characterization of a Fourth Xylanase, XynD, a Novel Enzyme Belonging to Glycoside Hydrolase Family 10.

The fungus Penicillium purpurogenum grows on a variety of natural carbon sources and secretes a large number of enzymes which degrade the polysaccharides present in lignocellulose. In this work, the gene coding for a novel endoxylanase has been identified in the genome of the fungus. This gene (xynd) possesses four introns. The cDNA has been expressed in Pichia pastoris and characterized. The enzyme, XynD, belongs to family 10 of the glycoside hydrolases. Mature XynD has a calculated molecular weight of 40,997. It consists of 387 amino acid residues with an N-terminal catalytic module, a linker rich in ser and thr…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Carbohydrate catabolic capability of a Flavobacteriia bacterium isolated from hadal water.

Flavobacteriia are abundant in many marine environments including hadal waters, as demonstrated recently. However, it is unclear how this flavobacterial population adapts to hadal conditions. In this study, extensive comparative genomic analyses were performed for the flavobacterial strain Euzebyella marina RN62 isolated from the Mariana Trench hadal water in low abundance. The complete genome of RN62 possessed a considerable number of carbohydrate-active enzymes with a different composition. There was a predominance of GH family 13 proteins compared to closely related relatives, suggesting that RN62 has preserved a certain capacity for carbohydrate utilization and that the hadal ocean may hold an…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 identifies potential niche-specific genes and pathways for gastrointestinal adaptation.

Lactobacillus mucosae is currently of interest as putative probiotics due to their metabolic capabilities and ability to colonize host mucosal niches. L. mucosae LM1 has been studied in its functions in cell adhesion and pathogen inhibition, etc. It demonstrated unique abilities to use energy from carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate sources. Due to these functions, we report the first complete genome sequence of an L. mucosae strain, L. mucosae LM1. Analysis of the pan-genome in comparison with closely-related Lactobacillus species identified a complete glycogen metabolism pathway, as well as folate biosynthesis, complementing previous proteomic data on the LM1 strain. It also revealed…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Antarctic heterotrophic bacterium Hymenobacter nivis P3T displays light-enhanced growth and expresses putative photoactive proteins.

Hymenobacter nivis P3T is a heterotrophic bacterium isolated from Antarctic red snow generated by algal blooms. Despite being non-photosynthetic, H. nivis was dominantly found in the red snow environment that is exposed to high light and UV irradiation, suggesting that this species can flourish under such harsh conditions. In order to further understand the adaptive strategies on the snow surface environment of Antarctica, the genome of H. nivis P3T was sequenced and analyzed, which identified genes putatively encoding for light-reactive proteins such as proteorhodopsin, phytochrome, photolyase and several copies of cryptochromes. Culture-based experiments revealed that H. nivis P3T growth was…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Mitochondrial genome of the entomophthoroid fungus Conidiobolus heterosporus provides insights into evolution of basal fungi.

Entomophthoroid fungi represent an ecologically important group of fungal pathogens on insects. Here, the whole mitogenome of Conidiobolus heterosporus, one of the entomophthoroid fungi, was described and compared to those early branching fungi with available mitogenomes. The 53,364-bp circular mitogenome of C. heterosporus contained two rRNA genes, 14 standard protein-coding genes, 26 tRNA genes, and three free-standing ORFs. Thirty introns interrupted nine mitochondrial genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrion-encoded proteins revealed that C. heterosporus was most close to Zancudomyces culisetae in the Zoopagomycota of basal fungi. Comparison on mitogenomes of 23 basal fungi revealed great variabilities in terms of mitogenome…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Real time monitoring of Aeromonas salmonicida evolution in response to successive antibiotic therapies in a commercial fish farm.

Our ability to predict evolutionary trajectories of pathogens in response to antibiotic pressure is one of the promising leverage to fight against the present antibiotic resistance worldwide crisis. Yet, few studies tackled this question in situ at the outbreak level, due to the difficulty to link a given pathogenic clone evolution with its precise antibiotic exposure over time. In this study, we monitored the real-time evolution of an Aeromonas salmonicida clone in response to successive antibiotic and vaccine therapies in a commercial fish farm. The clone was responsible for a four-year outbreak of furunculosis within a Recirculating Aquaculture System Salmo…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Bradyrhizobium nanningense sp. nov., Bradyrhizobium guangzhouense sp. nov. and Bradyrhizobium zhanjiangense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of peanut in Southeast China.

Nine slow-growing rhizobia isolated from effective nodules on peanut (Arachis hypogaea) were characterized to clarify the taxonomic status using a polyphasic approach. They were assigned to the genus Bradyrhizobium on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences. MLSA of concatenated glnII-recA-dnaK genes classified them into three species represented by CCBAU 53390T, CCBAU 51670T and CCBAU 51778T, which presented the closest similarity to B. guangxiense CCBAU 53363T, B. guangdongense CCBAU 51649T and B. manausense BR 3351T, B. vignae 7-2T and B. forestalis INPA 54BT, respectively. The dDDH (digital DNA-DNA hybridization) and ANI (Average Nucleotide Identity) between the genomes of the three representative…

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