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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pilot satellitome analysis of the model plant, Physcomitrellapatens, revealed a transcribed and high-copy IGS related tandem repeat.

Satellite DNA (satDNA) constitutes a substantial part of eukaryotic genomes. In the last decade, it has been shown that satDNA is not an inert part of the genome and its function extends beyond the nuclear membrane. However, the number of model plant species suitable for studying the novel horizons of satDNA functionality is low. Here, we explored the satellitome of the model “basal” plant, Physcomitrellapatens (Hedwig, 1801) Bruch & Schimper, 1849 (moss), which has a number of advantages for deep functional and evolutionary research. Using a newly developed pyTanFinder pipeline (https://github.com/Kirovez/pyTanFinder) coupled with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we identified…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

BELLA: Berkeley Efficient Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper

De novo assembly is the process of reconstructing genomes from DNA fragments (reads), which may contain redundancy and errors. Longer reads simplify assembly and improve contiguity of the output, but current long-read technologies come with high error rates. A crucial step of de novo genome assembly for long reads consists of finding overlapping reads. We present Berkeley Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper (BELLA), which implement a novel approach to compute overlaps using Sparse Generalized Matrix Multiplication (SpGEMM). We present a probabilistic model which demonstrates the soundness of using short, fixed length k-mers to detect overlaps, avoiding expensive pairwise alignment…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomics and biochemistry investigation on the metabolic pathway of milled wood and alkali lignin-derived aromatic metabolites of Comamonas serinivorans SP-35.

The efficient depolymerization and utilization of lignin are one of the most important goals for the renewable use of lignocelluloses. The degradation and complete mineralization of lignin by bacteria represent a key step for carbon recycling in land ecosystems as well. However, many aspects of this process remain unclear, for example, the complex network of metabolic pathways involved in the degradation of lignin and the catabolic pathway of intermediate aromatic metabolites. To address these subjects, we characterized the deconstruction and mineralization of lignin with milled wood lignin (MWL, the most representative molecule of lignin in its native state) and alkali…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

iMGEins: detecting novel mobile genetic elements inserted in individual genomes.

Recent advances in sequencing technology have allowed us to investigate personal genomes to find structural variations, which have been studied extensively to identify their association with the physiology of diseases such as cancer. In particular, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) are one of the major constituents of the human genomes, and cause genome instability by insertion, mutation, and rearrangement.We have developed a new program, iMGEins, to identify such novel MGEs by using sequencing reads of individual genomes, and to explore the breakpoints with the supporting reads and MGEs detected. iMGEins is the first MGE detection program that integrates three algorithmic components:…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

CTX-M-65 extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica serotype infantis, United States.

Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to clinically important third-generation cephalosporins, which are often used to treat invasive salmonellosis. In the United States, ESBLs are rarely found in Salmonella. However, in 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration found blaCTX-M-65 ESBL-producing Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis in retail chicken meat. The isolate had a rare pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. To clarify the sources and potential effects on human health, we examined isolates with this pattern obtained from human surveillance and associated metadata. Using broth microdilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the isolates. Of 34 isolates, 29 carried the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Emergence of tigecycline resistance in Escherichia coli co-producing MCR-1 and NDM-5 during tigecycline salvage treatment.

Here, we report a case of severe infection caused by Escherichia coli that harbored mcr-1, blaNDM-5, and acquired resistance to tigecycline during tigecycline salvage therapy.Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, Southern blot hybridization, and complete genome sequence of the strains were carried out. The genetic characteristics of the mcr-1 and blaNDM-5 plasmids were analyzed. The whole genome sequencing of mcr-1-containing plasmid was completed. Finally, putative single nucleotide polymorphisms and deletion mutations in the tigecycline-resistant strain were predicted.Three E. coli isolates were obtained from ascites, pleural effusion, and stool of a patient; they were resistant to almost all the tested antibiotics. The first two…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the polymyxin E (colistin)-producing Paenibacillus sp. strain B-LR.

Paenibacillus bacteria are recovered from varied niches, including human lung, rhizosphere, marine sediments, and hemolymph. Paenibacilli can have plant growth-promoting activities and be antibiotic producers. They can produce exopolysaccharides and enzymes of industrial interest. Illumina and PacBio reads were used to produce a complete genome sequence of the colistin producer Paenibacillus sp. strain B-LR.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter halophilus type strain CCUG 53805.

Many Arcobacter spp. are free living and are routinely recovered from marine environments. Arcobacter halophilus was isolated from hypersaline lagoon water in the Hawaiian islands, and it was demonstrated to be an obligate halophile. This study describes the complete whole-genome sequence of the A. halophilus type strain, CCUG 53805 (= LA31BT = ATCC BAA-1022T).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Velez bacillusL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role evaluation and all Genome Analysis

[Objective] Clear Velez bacillus(Bacillus S rDNA Sequence) L-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of suppression role clear Bacteria L-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability and may be of Antagonistic mechanism. [Methods] by in vitro determination, living determination and pathogenic bacteria mycelium morphology observation evaluation StrainL-1The pear Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium bacteria of antagonistic activity. To pear Botrytis cinerea bacteria for try pathogenic bacteria use Oxford Cup method determination StrainL-1Sterile fermentation broth antagonistic activity of stability. UsePacbio rsiiThree generations sequencing technology determinationL-1Of all gene sequence will all gene sequence and gene protein sequence databaseBLASTComparison Analysis prediction StrainL-1May be of…

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