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Friday, July 19, 2019

Iterative optimization of xylose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using combinatorial expression tuning.

A common challenge in metabolic engineering is rapidly identifying rate-controlling enzymes in heterologous pathways for subsequent production improvement. We demonstrate a workflow to address this challenge and apply it to improving xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For eight reactions required for conversion of xylose to ethanol, we screened enzymes for functional expression in S. cerevisiae, followed by a combinatorial expression analysis to achieve pathway flux balancing and identification of limiting enzymatic activities. In the next round of strain engineering, we increased the copy number of these limiting enzymes and again tested the eight-enzyme combinatorial expression library in this new background.…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Characterization of a large antibiotic resistance plasmid found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain B171 and its relatedness to plasmids of diverse E. coli and Shigella.

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of severe infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Previous research has focused on the diversity of the EPEC virulence plasmid, whereas less is known regarding the genetic content and distribution of antibiotic resistance plasmids carried by EPEC. A previous study demonstrated that in addition to the virulence plasmid, reference EPEC strain B171 harbors a second, larger plasmid that confers antibiotic resistance. To further understand the genetic diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance plasmids among EPEC strains, we describe the complete sequence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from EPEC strain B171. The resistance plasmid,…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

A new method for sequencing the hypervariable Plasmodium falciparum gene var2csa from clinical samples.

VAR2CSA, a member of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, mediates the binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chondroitin sulfate A, a surface-associated molecule expressed in placental cells, and plays a central role in the pathogenesis of placental malaria. VAR2CSA is a target of naturally acquired immunity and, as such, is a leading vaccine candidate against placental malaria. This protein is very polymorphic and technically challenging to sequence. Published var2csa sequences, mostly limited to specific domains, have been generated through the sequencing of cloned PCR amplicons using capillary electrophoresis, a method that is both time consuming and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete sequences of six IncA/C plasmids of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport.

Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport has been a long-standing public health concern in the United States. We present the complete sequences of six IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived MDR S. Newport ranging from 80.1 to 158.5 kb. They shared a genetic backbone with S. Newport IncA/C plasmids pSN254 and pAM04528. Copyright © 2015 Cao et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singapore wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets.

We report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species. Copyright © 2015 Dichosa et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the clinical Beijing-like strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis 323 using the PacBio real-time sequencing platform.

We report here the whole-genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant Beijing-like strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis 323, isolated from a 15-year-old female patient who died shortly after the initiation of second-line drug treatment. This strain is representative of the Beijing-like isolates from Colombia, where this lineage is becoming a public health concern. Copyright © 2015 Rodríguez et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence analysis of Bacillus subtilis T30.

The complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis T30 was determined by SMRT sequencing. The entire genome contains 4,138 predicted genes. The genome carries one intact prophage sequence (37.4 kb) similar to Bacillus phage SPBc2 and one incomplete prophage genome of 39.9 kb similar to Bacillus phage phi105. Copyright © 2015 Xu et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of ER2796, a DNA methyltransferase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KO116, an ionic liquid-tolerant marine bacterium isolated from a lignin-enriched seawater microcosm.

Halomonas sp. strain KO116 was isolated from Nile Delta Mediterranean Sea surface water enriched with insoluble organosolv lignin. It was further screened for growth on alkali lignin minimal salts medium agar. The strain tolerates the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Its complete genome sequence is presented in this report. Copyright © 2015 O’Dell et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain B8300, which displays high twitching motility.

Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen causing health care-associated infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a twitching-positive clinical strain, B8300, isolated from a hospital in southern India. De novo assembly of PacBio long-read sequencing data generated the B8300 genome that consists of a chromosome of 3.82 Mbp and a plasmid of 25.15 kbp. Copyright © 2015 Vijaykumar et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, a member of a remarkably competitive group of Negativicutes in the Firmicutes phylum.

The genome of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, isolated from a chromium-contaminated site in Hanford, Washington, USA, has been completed with PacBio sequencing. Nine copies of the rRNA gene operon and multiple transposase genes with identical sequences resulted in breaks in the original draft genome and may suggest genomic instability of JBW45. Copyright © 2015 De León et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome and methylome of a beetle with complex social behavior, Nicrophorus vespilloides (Coleoptera: Silphidae).

Testing for conserved and novel mechanisms underlying phenotypic evolution requires a diversity of genomes available for comparison spanning multiple independent lineages. For example, complex social behavior in insects has been investigated primarily with eusocial lineages, nearly all of which are Hymenoptera. If conserved genomic influences on sociality do exist, we need data from a wider range of taxa that also vary in their levels of sociality. Here, we present the assembled and annotated genome of the subsocial beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, a species long used to investigate evolutionary questions of complex social behavior. We used this genome to address two questions.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-coverage sequencing and annotated assemblies of the budgerigar genome.

Parrots belong to a group of behaviorally advanced vertebrates and have an advanced ability of vocal learning relative to other vocal-learning birds. They can imitate human speech, synchronize their body movements to a rhythmic beat, and understand complex concepts of referential meaning to sounds. However, little is known about the genetics of these traits. Elucidating the genetic bases would require whole genome sequencing and a robust assembly of a parrot genome.We present a genomic resource for the budgerigar, an Australian Parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus) — the most widely studied parrot species in neuroscience and behavior. We present genomic sequence data that…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Automated ensemble assembly and validation of microbial genomes.

The continued democratization of DNA sequencing has sparked a new wave of development of genome assembly and assembly validation methods. As individual research labs, rather than centralized centers, begin to sequence the majority of new genomes, it is important to establish best practices for genome assembly. However, recent evaluations such as GAGE and the Assemblathon have concluded that there is no single best approach to genome assembly. Instead, it is preferable to generate multiple assemblies and validate them to determine which is most useful for the desired analysis; this is a labor-intensive process that is often impossible or unfeasible.To encourage…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain P482, a tomato rhizosphere isolate with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity.

The tomato rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain P482 is a member of a diverse group of fluorescent pseudomonads. P482 produces a yet unidentified broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound(s), active inter alia (i.a.) against Dickeya spp. Here, we present a nearly complete genome of P482 obtained by a hybrid assembly of Illumina and PacBio sequencing data. Copyright © 2014 Krzyzanowska et al.

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