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June 24, 2016

The rubber tree genome shows expansion of gene family associated with rubber biosynthesis.

Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg, a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, is the sole natural resource exploited for commercial production of high-quality natural rubber. The properties of natural rubber latex are almost irreplaceable by synthetic counterparts for many industrial applications. A paucity of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of rubber biosynthesis in high yield traits still persists. Here we report the comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the widely planted H. brasiliensis clone, RRIM 600. The genome was assembled based on ~155-fold combined coverage with Illumina and PacBio sequence data and has a total length of 1.55?Gb with 72.5% comprising repetitive DNA sequences.…

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June 24, 2016

Unveiling the complexity of the maize transcriptome by single-molecule long-read sequencing.

Zea mays is an important genetic model for elucidating transcriptional networks. Uncertainties about the complete structure of mRNA transcripts limit the progress of research in this system. Here, using single-molecule sequencing technology, we produce 111,151 transcripts from 6 tissues capturing ~70% of the genes annotated in maize RefGen_v3 genome. A large proportion of transcripts (57%) represent novel, sometimes tissue-specific, isoforms of known genes and 3% correspond to novel gene loci. In other cases, the identified transcripts have improved existing gene models. Averaging across all six tissues, 90% of the splice junctions are supported by short reads from matched tissues. In…

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June 23, 2016

Complete genome sequence of the first KPC-type carbapenemase-positive Proteus mirabilis strain from a bloodstream infectio

Sequencing of the blaKPC-positive strain Proteus mirabilis AOUC-001 was performed using both the MiSeq and PacBio RS II platforms and yielded a single molecule of 4,272,433 bp, representing the complete chromosome. Genome analysis showed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants, including two copies of blaKPC-2 carried on a fragment of a KPC-producing plasmid previously described in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Copyright © 2016 Di Pilato et al.

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June 20, 2016

Initial assessment of the molecular epidemiology of blaNDM-1 in Colombia.

We report complete genome sequences of fourblaNDM-1-harboring Gram-negative multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates from Colombia. TheblaNDM-1genes were located 193Kb-Inc FIA, 178Kb-Inc A/C2 and 47Kb (unknown Inc type) plasmids. MLST revealed that isolates belong to ST10 (Escherichia coli), ST392 (Klebsiella pneumoniae), and ST322 and ST464 (Acinetobacter baumanniiandA. nosocomialis, respectively). Our analysis identified that the Inc A/C2 plasmid inE. colicontained a novel complex transposon (Tn125and Tn5393with 3 copies ofblaNDM-1) and a recombination "hotspot" for the acquisition of new resistance determinants. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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June 14, 2016

Genome-wide characterization of human L1 antisense promoter-driven transcripts.

Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only autonomously active, transposable element in the human genome. L1 sequences comprise approximately 17 % of the human genome, but only the evolutionarily recent, human-specific subfamily is retrotransposition competent. The L1 promoter has a bidirectional orientation containing a sense promoter that drives the transcription of two proteins required for retrotransposition and an antisense promoter. The L1 antisense promoter can drive transcription of chimeric transcripts: 5' L1 antisense sequences spliced to the exons of neighboring genes.The impact of L1 antisense promoter activity on cellular transcriptomes is poorly understood. To investigate this, we analyzed GenBank…

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June 2, 2016

The industrial melanism mutation in British peppered moths is a transposable element.

Discovering the mutational events that fuel adaptation to environmental change remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. The classroom example of a visible evolutionary response is industrial melanism in the peppered moth (Biston betularia): the replacement, during the Industrial Revolution, of the common pale typica form by a previously unknown black (carbonaria) form, driven by the interaction between bird predation and coal pollution. The carbonaria locus has been coarsely localized to a 200-kilobase region, but the specific identity and nature of the sequence difference controlling the carbonaria-typica polymorphism, and the gene it influences, are unknown. Here we show that the…

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June 1, 2016

Nested Russian doll-like genetic mobility drives rapid dissemination of the Carbapenem resistance gene blaKPC

The recent widespread emergence of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is a major public health concern, as carbapenems are a therapy of last resort against this family of common bacterial pathogens. Resistance genes can mobilize via various mechanisms, including conjugation and transposition; however, the importance of this mobility in short-term evolution, such as within nosocomial outbreaks, is unknown. Using a combination of short- and long-read whole-genome sequencing of 281 blaKPC-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from a single hospital over 5 years, we demonstrate rapid dissemination of this carbapenem resistance gene to multiple species, strains, and plasmids. Mobility of blaKPC occurs at multiple nested…

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June 1, 2016

A novel plasmid, pSx1, harboring a new Tn1696 derivative from extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis encoding OXA-416.

The whole genome sequencing of extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis T17 isolated from hospital effluents in Algeria revealed the presence of a novel 268.4?kb plasmid designated pSx1, which carries several antibiotic-resistance genes in the novel Tn1696 derivative (Tn6297), in addition to the chromosomal blaOXA-48-like gene (blaOXA-416). The presence of the plasmid was confirmed by nuclease S1-PFGE analysis and transformation by electroporation into Escherichia coli DH10B. Tn6297 contains an In27 class 1 integron harboring the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 array, msr(E) and mph(E) associated with IS26; a new efflux pump multidrug resistance composite transposon delimited by two ISEc29s; Tn-tet harboring tetR and tetA(C); a class…

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May 19, 2016

Diverse CRISPR-Cas responses and dramatic cellular DNA changes and cell death in pKEF9-conjugated Sulfolobus species.

The Sulfolobales host a unique family of crenarchaeal conjugative plasmids some of which undergo complex rearrangements intracellularly. Here we examined the conjugation cycle of pKEF9 in the recipient strain Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. The plasmid conjugated and replicated rapidly generating high average copy numbers which led to strong growth retardation that was coincident with activation of CRISPR-Cas adaptation. Simultaneously, intracellular DNA was extensively degraded and this also occurred in a conjugated ?cas6 mutant lacking a CRISPR-Cas immune response. Furthermore, the integrated forms of pKEF9 in the donor Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 and recipient host were specifically corrupted by transposable orfB elements, indicative…

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May 12, 2016

The Atlantic salmon genome provides insights into rediploidization.

The whole-genome duplication 80 million years ago of the common ancestor of salmonids (salmonid-specific fourth vertebrate whole-genome duplication, Ss4R) provides unique opportunities to learn about the evolutionary fate of a duplicated vertebrate genome in 70 extant lineages. Here we present a high-quality genome assembly for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and show that large genomic reorganizations, coinciding with bursts of transposon-mediated repeat expansions, were crucial for the post-Ss4R rediploidization process. Comparisons of duplicate gene expression patterns across a wide range of tissues with orthologous genes from a pre-Ss4R outgroup unexpectedly demonstrate far more instances of neofunctionalization than subfunctionalization. Surprisingly, we find…

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May 3, 2016

Single-cell (meta-)genomics of a dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii reveals genomic plasticity.

The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short…

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May 1, 2016

Mind the gap; seven reasons to close fragmented genome assemblies.

Like other domains of life, research into the biology of filamentous microbes has greatly benefited from the advent of whole-genome sequencing. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized sequencing, making genomic sciences accessible to many academic laboratories including those that study non-model organisms. Thus, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and are publically available today, although these initiatives have typically yielded considerably fragmented genome assemblies that often lack large contiguous genomic regions. Many important genomic features are contained in intergenic DNA that is often missing in current genome assemblies, and recent studies underscore the significance of non-coding regions and repetitive…

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April 25, 2016

Mechanisms involved in acquisition of blaNDM genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY plasmids.

blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A…

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April 12, 2016

Radical remodeling of the Y chromosome in a recent radiation of malaria mosquitoes.

Y chromosomes control essential male functions in many species, including sex determination and fertility. However, because of obstacles posed by repeat-rich heterochromatin, knowledge of Y chromosome sequences is limited to a handful of model organisms, constraining our understanding of Y biology across the tree of life. Here, we leverage long single-molecule sequencing to determine the content and structure of the nonrecombining Y chromosome of the primary African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. We find that the An. gambiae Y consists almost entirely of a few massively amplified, tandemly arrayed repeats, some of which can recombine with similar repeats on the X…

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April 8, 2016

Rapid emergence and evolution of Staphylococcus aureus clones harbouring fusC-containing Staphylococcal cassette chromosome elements.

The prevalence of fusidic acid (FA) resistance amongst Staphylococcus aureus in New Zealand (NZ) is amongst the highest reported globally, with a recent study describing a resistance rate of approximately 28%. Three FA-resistant S. aureus clones (ST5 MRSA, ST1 MSSA and ST1 MRSA) have emerged over the past decade and now predominate in NZ, and in all three clones FA resistance is mediated by the fusC gene. In particular, ST5 MRSA has rapidly become the dominant MRSA clone in NZ, although the origin of FA-resistant ST5 MRSA has not been explored, and the genetic context of fusC in FA-resistant NZ…

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