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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a colistin resistance gene (mcr-1)-bearing isolate of Escherichia coli from the United States.

Transmissible colistin resistance conferred by the mcr-1 gene-bearing IncI2 plasmid has been recently reported in Escherichia coli in the United States. We report here the completed genome sequence of a second E. coli strain isolated from swine in the United States that carried the mcr-1 gene on an IncI2-type plasmid. Copyright © 2016 Meinersmann et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pathogenesis of multi drug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis as a determinant of future treatment success.

Multidrug-resistant (MDR)/extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a significant threat to global TB control [1]. In most cases, treatment of MDR/XDR TB is not standardized, and clinicians have adopted a variety of treatment strategies. These strategies include switching to a regimen of new drugs, increasing the dosage of the same drugs, rarely used drugs (which have widespread resistance), etc. Drug resistance is a manmade phenomenon that is driven by treatment strategy (i.e., regimen). These divergent approaches may differentially drive the evolution of bacteria. Some instances of this evolution have already occurred [2]. The community’s focus has been on drug resistance;…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Clostridium estertheticum DSM 8809, a microbe identified in spoiled vacuum packed beef.

Blown pack spoilage (BPS) is a major issue for the beef industry. Etiological agents of BPS involve members of a group of Clostridium species, including Clostridium estertheticum which has the ability to produce gas, mostly carbon dioxide, under anaerobic psychotrophic growth conditions. This spore-forming bacterium grows slowly under laboratory conditions, and it can take up to 3 months to produce a workable culture. These characteristics have limited the study of this commercially challenging bacterium. Consequently information on this bacterium is limited and no effective controls are currently available to confidently detect and manage this production risk. In this study the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete sequence of a F33:A-:B- conjugative plasmid carrying the oqxAB, fosA3, and blaCTX-M-55 elements from a foodborne Escherichia coli strain.

This study reports the complete sequence of pE80, a conjugative IncFII plasmid recovered from an Escherichia coli strain isolated from chicken meat. This plasmid harbors multiple resistance determinants including oqxAB, fosA3, blaCTX-M-55, and blaTEM-1, and is a close variant of the recently reported p42-2 element, which was recovered from E. coli of veterinary source. Recovery of pE80 constitutes evidence that evolution or genetic re-arrangement of IncFII type plasmids residing in animal-borne organisms is an active event, which involves acquisition and integration of foreign resistance elements into the plasmid backbone. Dissemination of these plasmids may further compromise the effectiveness of current…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Investigation of and response to 2 plague cases, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2015.

In August 2015, plague was diagnosed for 2 persons who had visited Yosemite National Park in California, USA. One case was septicemic and the other bubonic. Subsequent environmental investigation identified probable locations of exposure for each patient and evidence of epizootic plague in other areas of the park. Transmission of Yersinia pestis was detected by testing rodent serum, fleas, and rodent carcasses. The environmental investigation and whole-genome multilocus sequence typing of Y. pestis isolates from the patients and environmental samples indicated that the patients had been exposed in different locations and that at least 2 distinct strains of Y. pestis…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Active and adaptive Legionella CRISPR-Cas reveals a recurrent challenge to the pathogen.

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats with CRISPR-associated gene (CRISPR-Cas) systems are widely recognized as critical genome defense systems that protect microbes from external threats such as bacteriophage infection. Several isolates of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila possess multiple CRISPR-Cas systems (type I-C, type I-F and type II-B), yet the targets of these systems remain unknown. With the recent observation that at least one of these systems (II-B) plays a non-canonical role in supporting intracellular replication, the possibility remained that these systems are vestigial genome defense systems co-opted for other purposes. Our data indicate that this is not the case.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences for three chromosomes of the Burkholderia stabilis type strain (ATCC BAA-67).

We report here the complete annotated genome sequence of the Burkholderia stabilis type strain ATCC BAA-67. There were three circular chromosomes with a combined size of 8,527,947 bp and G+C composition of 66.4%. These characteristics closely resemble the genomes of other sequenced members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Copyright © 2016 Bugrysheva et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Finished genome sequence of the highly multidrug-resistant human urine isolate Citrobacter freundii strain SL151.

Citrobacter freundii is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that is increasingly being recognized as a causative agent of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections and an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance determinants. In this report, we describe the finished genome sequence of C. freundii strain SL151, a highly multidrug-resistant human urine isolate. Copyright © 2016 Leski et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete, closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from human and bovine sources.

Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of 10 S Typhimurium strains, 5 each isolated from human and bovine sources. Copyright © 2016 Nguyen et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete whole-genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java NCTC5706.

Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939.© Crown copyright 2016.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae KP36, a strain isolated from a patient with an upper urinary tract infection.

Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae KP36, a strain isolated from a patient with a severe community-acquired urinary tract infection. This genome provides insights into the pathogenesis of a pandemic K. pneumoniae strain from a community-acquired urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Lin et al.

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