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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Keeping an eye on P. aeruginosa.

This month’s Genome Watch looks at how whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can be used to track the source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and to investigate the transition and adaptation of this opportunistic pathogen from the environment to the human host.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Schroeter 1872) Migula 1900 (DSM 50071T), determined using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology.

The first complete genome sequence of the type strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Schroeter 1872) Migula 1900 (DSM 50071(T)) was determined in a single contig by PacBio RS II. The genome (6,317,050 bp, G+C content of 66.52%) contained 10 sets of >1,000-bp identical sequence pairs and 183 tandem repeats. Copyright © 2015 Nakano et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas trivialis strain IHBB745 with multiple plant growth-promoting activities and tolerance to desiccation and alkalinity

The complete genome sequence of 6.45 Mb is reported here for Pseudomonas trivialis strain IHBB745 (MTCC 5336), which is an efficient, stress-tolerant, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. The gene-coding clusters predicted the genes for phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, and stress response. Copyright © 2015 Gulati et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Enzymatic degradation of phenazines can generate energy and protect sensitive organisms from toxicity.

Diverse bacteria, including several Pseudomonas species, produce a class of redox-active metabolites called phenazines that impact different cell types in nature and disease. Phenazines can affect microbial communities in both positive and negative ways, where their presence is correlated with decreased species richness and diversity. However, little is known about how the concentration of phenazines is modulated in situ and what this may mean for the fitness of members of the community. Through culturing of phenazine-degrading mycobacteria, genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and molecular analysis, we identified several conserved genes that are important for the degradation of three Pseudomonas-derived phenazines: phenazine-1-carboxylic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, isolated from a patient with a respiratory tract infection.

We report the 6,498,072-bp complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, which was isolated from a patient with a respiratory tract infection in Chongqing, People’s Republic of China. Whole-genome sequencing was performed using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology, and de novo assembly revealed a single contig with 396-fold sequence coverage. Copyright © 2015 Lu et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of highly adherent Pseudomonas aeruginosa small-colony variant SCV20265.

The evolution of small-colony variants within Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations chronically infecting the cystic fibrosis lung is one example of the emergence of adapted subpopulations. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the autoaggregative and hyperpiliated P. aeruginosa small-colony variant SCV20265, which was isolated from a cystic ?brosis (CF) patient.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the highly transformable Pseudomonas stutzeri strain 28a24.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence for an isolate of Pseudomonas stutzeri that is highly competent for natural transformation. This sequence enables insights into the genetic basis of natural transformation rate variations and provides an additional data point for genomic comparisons across a ubiquitous and highly diverse bacterial species. Copyright © 2014 Smith et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas brassicacearum DF41.

Pseudomonas brassicacearum DF41, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, is able to suppress the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through a process known as biological control. Here, we present a 6.8-Mb assembly of its genome, which is the second fully assembled genome of a P. brassicacearum strain.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the sugar cane endophyte Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2, a disease-suppressive bacterium with antifungal activity toward the plant pathogen Colletotrichum falcatum.

The endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2 exhibits antifungal activity and represents a biocontrol agent to suppress red rot disease of sugar cane. Here, we report the completely sequenced 6.6-Mb genome of P. aurantiaca PB-St2. The sequence contains a repertoire of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites that putatively contribute to its antagonistic activity and its plant-microbe interactions.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Life cycles, fitness decoupling and the evolution of multicellularity.

Cooperation is central to the emergence of multicellular life; however, the means by which the earliest collectives (groups of cells) maintained integrity in the face of destructive cheating types is unclear. One idea posits cheats as a primitive germ line in a life cycle that facilitates collective reproduction. Here we describe an experiment in which simple cooperating lineages of bacteria were propagated under a selective regime that rewarded collective-level persistence. Collectives reproduced via life cycles that either embraced, or purged, cheating types. When embraced, the life cycle alternated between phenotypic states. Selection fostered inception of a developmental switch that underpinned…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the caprolactam-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas mosselii SJ10 isolated from wastewater of a nylon 6 production plant.

Pseudomonas mosselii strain SJ10 is a caprolactam-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which was isolated from wastewater of the nylon 6 producing Seongseo industrial complex in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the strain, providing genetic information for biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aurantiaca strain JD37.

Pseudomonas aurantiaca Strain JD37, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from potato rhizosphere soil (Shanghai, China), is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. The JD37 genome consists of only one chromosome with no plasmids. Its genome contains genes involved plant growth promoting, biological control, and other function. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P. aurantiaca JD37. As far as we know, this is the first whole-genome of this species.

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