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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete mitochondrial genome of Sanghuangporus sanghuang (Hymenochaetaceae, Basidiomycota)

Sanghuang is a polypore mushroom, which has been widely used in oriental medicine. Since recent molecular phylogenetic studies elucidated its species delimitation, Sanghaungporus sanghuang became the official name of this fungus. In this study, the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of S. sanghuang was determined. The whole genome was 112,060?bp containing 14 proteins, 2 ribosomal RNA subunits, and 45 transfer RNAs. The overall GC content of the genome was 23.21%. A neighbour-joining tree based on atp6 sequence data showed its close relationship with the species of Ganoderma and Trametes.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of lytic bacteriophage SA7 infecting Staphylococcus aureus isolates

Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive and a round-shaped bacterium of Firmicutes phylum, and is a common cause of skin infections, respiratory infections, and food poisoning. Bacteriophages infecting S. aureus can be an effective treatment for S. aureus infections. Here, the draft genomic sequence is announced for a lytic bacteriophage SA7 infecting S. aureus isolates. The bacteriophage SA7 was isolated from a sewage water sample near a livestock farm in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea. SA7 has a genome of 34,730 bp and 34.1% G + C content. The genome has 53 protein-coding genes, 23 of which have predicted functions from BLASTp analysis,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Fusobacterium vincentii KCOM 2931 isolated from a human periodontitis lesion

Recently, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincentii was reclassified as Fusobacterium vincentii based on the average nucleotide identity and genome-to-genome distance analyses. F. vincentii is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, and filament-shaped bacterium. F. vincentii is a member of normal flora of human oral cavity and plays a role in periodontal diseases. F. vincentii KCOM 2931 was isolated from a periodontitis lesion. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of F. vincentii KCOM 2931.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae strain EpK1/15 isolated from an apple twig showing black shoot blight

Erwinia pyrifoliae is a Gram-negative bacterium causing black shoot blight in apple and Asian pear trees. E. pyrifoliae strain EpK1/15 was isolated in 2014 from an apple twig from the Pocheon, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of E. pyrifoliae EpK1/15 using PacBio RS II platform. The draft genome is comprised of a circular chromosome with 4,027,225 bp and 53.4% G + C content and a plasmid with 48,456 bp and 50.3% G + C content. The draft genome includes 3,798 protein-coding genes, 22 rRNA genes, 77 tRNA genes, 13 non-coding RNA genes, and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete and assembled genome sequence of an NDM-9- and CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST147 wastewater isolate from Switzerland.

Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have emerged worldwide and represent a major threat to human health. Here we report the genome sequence of K. pneumoniae 002SK2, an NDM-9- and CTX-M-15-producing strain isolated from wastewater in Switzerland and belonging to the international high-risk clone sequence type 147 (ST147).Whole-genome sequencing of K. pneumoniae 002SK2 was performed using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) technology RS2 reads (C4/P6 chemistry). De novo assembly was performed using Canu assembler, and sequences were annotated using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP).The genome of K. pneumoniae 002SK2 consists of a 5.4-Mbp chromosome containing blaSHV-11 and fosA6, a 159-kb…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Probiotic genomes: Sequencing and annotation in the past decade

Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer many health benefits to the host when administered in adequate quantities. These health benefits have garnered much attention towards Probiotics and have given an impetus to their use as dietary supplements for the improvement of general health and as adjuvant therapies for certain diseases. The increased demand for probiotic products in the recent times has provided the thrust for probiotic research applied to several areas of human biology. The advances in genomic technologies have further facilitated the sequencing of the genomes of such probiotic bacteria and their genomic analyses to identify the genes that…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Thauera sinica sp. nov., a phenol derivative-degrading bacterium isolated from activated sludge.

A bacterial strain, K11T, capable of degrading phenol derivatives was isolated from activated sludge of a sewage treatment plant in China. This strain, which can degrade more than ten phenol derivatives, was identified as a Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped, asporogenous, facultative anaerobic bacterium with a polar flagellum. The strain was found to grow in tryptic soy broth in the presence of 0-2.5% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0-1%), at 4-43 °C (optimum 30-35 °C) and pH 4.5-10.5 (optimum 7.5-8). Comparative analysis of nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this strain belongs to the genus Thauera. The 16S rRNA gene sequence was found to…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Darwin: A genomics co-processor provides up to 15,000 X acceleration on long read assembly

of life in fundamental ways. Genomics data, however, is far outpacing Moore’s Law. Third-generation sequencing tech- nologies produce 100× longer reads than second generation technologies and reveal a much broader mutation spectrum of disease and evolution. However, these technologies incur prohibitively high computational costs. Over 1,300 CPU hours are required for reference-guided assembly of the human genome (using [47]), and over 15,600 CPU hours are required for de novo assembly [57]. This paper describes “Darwin” — a co-processor for genomic sequence alignment that, without sacrificing sensitivity, provides up to 15,000× speedup over the state-of-the-art software for reference-guided assembly of third-generation…

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: Circular Consensus Sequence analysis application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Circular Consensus Sequence (CCS) analysis application. The CCS algorithm is used in applications that require distinguishing closely related DNA molecules in the same sample. Applications of CCS include profiling microbial communities, resolving viral populations and accurately identifying somatic variations within heterogeneous tumor cells.

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: Long Amplicon Analysis application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Long Amplicon Analysis (LAA) application. The LAA algorithm generates highly accurate, phased and full-length consensus sequences from long amplicons. Applications of LAA include HLA typing, alternative haplotyping, and localized de novo assemblies of targeted genes.

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: Iso-Seq analysis application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Isoform Sequencing (Iso-Seq) analysis application. The Iso-Seq application provides reads that span entire transcript isoforms, from the 5′ end to the 3′ polyA-tail. Generation of accurate, full-length transcript sequences greatly simplifies analysis by eliminating the need for transcript reconstruction to infer isoforms using error-prone assembly of short RNA-seq reads.

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: HGAP4 de novo assembly application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP4) de novo assembly analysis application. HGAP4 generates accurate de novo assemblies using only PacBio data. HGAP4 is suitable for assembling a wide range of genome sizes and complexity. HGAP4 now includes some support for diploid-aware assembly.

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