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March 1, 2019

Harnessing Long-Read Amplicon Sequencing to Uncover NRPS and Type I PKS Gene Sequence Diversity in Polar Desert Soils.

The severity of environmental conditions at Earth's frigid zones present attractive opportunities for microbial biomining due to their heightened potential as reservoirs for novel secondary metabolites. Arid soil microbiomes within the Antarctic and Arctic circles are remarkably rich in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, bacterial phyla known to be prolific producers of natural products. Yet the diversity of secondary metabolite genes within these cold, extreme environments remain largely unknown. Here, we employed amplicon sequencing using PacBio RS II, a third generation long-read platform, to survey over 200 soils spanning twelve east Antarctic and high Arctic sites for natural product-encoding genes, specifically targeting…

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March 1, 2019

Comparative genomics and pathogenicity potential of members of the Pseudomonas syringae species complex on Prunus spp.

Diseases on Prunus spp. have been associated with a large number of phylogenetically different pathovars and species within the P. syringae species complex. Despite their economic significance, there is a severe lack of genomic information of these pathogens. The high phylogenetic diversity observed within strains causing disease on Prunus spp. in nature, raised the question whether other strains or species within the P. syringae species complex were potentially pathogenic on Prunus spp.To gain insight into the genomic potential of adaptation and virulence in Prunus spp., a total of twelve de novo whole genome sequences of P. syringae pathovars and species…

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February 1, 2019

A draft genome assembly of the solar-powered sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

Elysia chlorotica, a sacoglossan sea slug found off the East Coast of the United States, is well-known for its ability to sequester chloroplasts from its algal prey and survive by photosynthesis for up to 12 months in the absence of food supply. Here we present a draft genome assembly of E. chlorotica that was generated using a hybrid assembly strategy with Illumina short reads and PacBio long reads. The genome assembly comprised 9,989 scaffolds, with a total length of 557?Mb and a scaffold N50 of 442?kb. BUSCO assessment indicated that 93.3% of the expected metazoan genes were completely present in…

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January 1, 2019

Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis NCM 61, with High Potential for Biofilm Formation, Isolated from Meat-Related Sources.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain NMC 61 of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, which was previously isolated from conveyor belts during chicken slaughter and has the potential to form biofilms on several surfaces. The genome is predicted to contain 110 noncoding small RNAs on the chromosome.

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January 1, 2019

The genomes of polyextremophilic Cyanidiales contain 1% horizontally transferred genes with diverse adaptive functions

The role and extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotes are hotly disputed topics that impact our understanding regarding the origin of metabolic processes and the role of organelles in cellular evolution. We addressed this issue by analyzing 10 novel Cyanidiales genomes and determined that 1% of their gene inventory is HGT-derived. Numerous HGT candidates originated from polyextremophilic prokaryotes that live in similar habitats as the Cyanidiales and encodes functions related to polyextremophily. HGT candidates differ from native genes in GC-content, number of splice sites, and gene expression. HGT candidates are more prone to loss, which may explain the…

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December 1, 2018

Complete genome sequence of WM99c, an antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 2 (GC2) strain representing an Australian GC2 lineage.

The extensively antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate WM99c recovered in Sydney, Australia, in 1999 is an early representative of a distinct lineage of global clone 2 (GC2) seen on the east coast of Australia. We present the complete 4.121-Mbp genome sequence (chromosome plus 2 plasmids), generated via long-read sequencing (PacBio).

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December 1, 2018

Genome of the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida, Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), a worldwide parasite of social bee colonies, provides insights into detoxification and herbivory.

The small hive beetle (Aethina tumida; ATUMI) is an invasive parasite of bee colonies. ATUMI feeds on both fruits and bee nest products, facilitating its spread and increasing its impact on honey bees and other pollinators. We have sequenced and annotated the ATUMI genome, providing the first genomic resources for this species and for the Nitidulidae, a beetle family that is closely related to the extraordinarily species-rich clade of beetles known as the Phytophaga. ATUMI thus provides a contrasting view as a neighbor for one of the most successful known animal groups.We present a robust genome assembly and a gene…

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November 1, 2018

Genome sequence of Halomonas hydrothermalis Y2, an efficient ectoine-producer isolated from pulp mill wastewater.

Halophilic microorganisms have great potentials towards biotechnological applications. Halomonas hydrothermalis Y2 is a halotolerant and alkaliphilic strain that isolated from the Na+-rich pulp mill wastewater. The strain is dominant in the bacterial community of pulp mill wastewater and exhibits metabolic diversity in utilizing various substrates. Here we present the genome sequence of this strain, which comprises a circular chromosome 3,933,432 bp in size and a GC content of 60.2%. Diverse genes that encoding proteins for compatible solutes synthesis and transport were identified from the genome. With a complete pathway for ectoine synthesis, the strain could produce ectoine from monosodium glutamate…

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November 1, 2018

Phylogenomics of colistin-susceptible and resistant XDR Acinetobacter baumannii.

Acinetobacter baumannii is a healthcare-associated pathogen with high rates of carbapenem resistance. Colistin is now routinely used for treatment of infections by this pathogen. However, colistin use has been associated with development of resistance to this agent.To elucidate the phylogenomics of colistin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strain pairs from a cohort of hospitalized patients at a tertiary medical centre in the USA.WGS data from 21 pairs of colistin-susceptible and -resistant, XDR clinical strains were obtained and compared using phylogeny of aligned genome sequences, assessment of pairwise SNP differences and gene content.Fourteen patients had colistin-resistant strains that were highly genetically related…

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November 1, 2018

The central exons of the human MUC2 and MUC6 mucins are highly repetitive and variable in sequence between individuals

The DNA sequence of the two human mucin genes MUC2 and MUC6 have not been completely resolved due to the repetitive nature of their central exon coding for Proline, Threonine and Serine rich sequences. The exact nucleotide sequence of these exons has remained unknown for a long time due to limitations in traditional sequencing techniques. These are still very poorly covered in new whole genome sequencing projects with the corresponding protein sequences partly missing. We used a BAC clone containing both these genes and third generation sequencing technology, SMRT sequencing, to obtain the full-length contiguous MUC2 and MUC6 tandem repeat…

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November 1, 2018

The genome of the tegu lizard Salvator merianae: combining Illumina, PacBio, and optical mapping data to generate a highly contiguous assembly.

Reptiles are a species-rich group with great phenotypic and life history diversity, but are highly underrepresented among the vertebrate species with sequenced genomes.Here, we report a high-quality genome assembly of the tegu lizard Salvator merianae, the first lacertid with a sequenced genome. We combined 74X Illumina short read, 29.8X PacBio long read and optical mapping data to generate a high-quality assembly with a scaffold N50 value of 55.4 Mb. The contig N50 value of this assembly is 521 Kb, making it the most contiguous reptile assembly so far. We show that the tegu assembly has the highest completeness of coding…

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November 1, 2018

N6-methyladenine DNA modification in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola genome.

DNA N6-methyladenine (6mA) modifications expand the information capacity of DNA and have long been known to exist in bacterial genomes. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzicola (Xoc) is the causative agent of bacterial leaf streak, an emerging and destructive disease in rice worldwide. However, the genome-wide distribution patterns and potential functions of 6mA in Xoc are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the levels and global distribution patterns of 6mA modification in genomic DNA of seven Xoc strains (BLS256, BLS279, CFBP2286, CFBP7331, CFBP7341, L8 and RS105). The 6mA modification was found to be widely distributed across the seven Xoc genomes, accounting…

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November 1, 2018

Full-length mRNA sequencing in Saccharina japonica and identification of carbonic anhydrase genes

The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes that play an important role in the absorption and transportation of CO2 in Saccharina japonica. They are encoded by a superfamily of genes with seven subtypes that are unrelated in sequence but share conserved function in catalyzing the reversible conversion of CO2 and HCO3-. Here we have characterized the CA members in the transcriptome of S. japonica using Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. Approximately 9830.4 megabases from 5,028,003 quality subreads were generated, and they were assembled into 326,512 full-length non-chimeric (FLNC) reads, with an average flnc read length of 2181 bp.…

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November 1, 2018

Complete Genome Sequence of Massilia oculi sp. nov. CCUG 43427T (=DSM 26321T), the Type Strain of M. oculi, and Comparison with Genome Sequences of Other Massilia Strains.

Massilia oculi sp. nov. of type strain CCUG 43427T is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, nonspore-forming bacterium, which was recently isolated from the eye of a patient suffering from endophthalmitis and was described as novel species in Massilia genus. In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of this strain by using Pacbio SMRT cell platform and compare this sequence with the genomes of 30 Massilia representative strains. Also, a comprehensive search was conducted for genes and proteins involved in antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. The genome of CCUG 43427T is 5,844,653 bp with 65.55% GC content. This genome contains four prophages and…

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