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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis revealed rapid differentiation in the pathogenicity-related gene repertoires between Pyricularia oryzae and Pyricularia penniseti isolated from a Pennisetum grass.

A number of Pyricularia species are known to infect different grass species. In the case of Pyricularia oryzae (syn. Magnaporthe oryzae), distinct populations are known to be adapted to a wide variety of grass hosts, including rice, wheat and many other grasses. The genome sizes of Pyricularia species are typical for filamentous ascomycete fungi [~?40 Mbp for P. oryzae, and ~?45 Mbp for P. grisea]. Genome plasticity, mediated in part by deletions promoted by recombination between repetitive elements [Genome Res 26:1091-1100, 2016, Nat Rev Microbiol 10:417-430,2012] and transposable elements [Annu Rev Phytopathol 55:483-503,2017] contributes to host adaptation. Therefore, comparisons of…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

A high-quality draft genome assembly of Sinella curviseta: A soil model organism (Collembola).

Sinella curviseta, among the most widespread springtails (Collembola) in Northern Hemisphere, has often been treated as a model organism in soil ecology and environmental toxicology. However, little information on its genetic knowledge severely hinders our understanding of its adaptations to the soil habitat. We present the largest genome assembly within Collembola using ~44.86?Gb (118X) of single-molecule real-time Pacific Bioscience Sequel sequencing. The final assembly of 599 scaffolds was ~381.46?Mb with a N50 length of 3.28?Mb, which captured 95.3% complete and 1.5% partial arthropod Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs (n?=?1066). Transcripts and circularized mitochondrial genome were also assembled. We predicted 23,943 protein-coding…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

The genome of the medicinal plant Andrographis paniculata provides insight into the biosynthesis of the bioactive diterpenoid neoandrographolide.

Andrographis paniculata is a herbaceous dicot plant widely used for its anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties across its distribution in China, India and other Southeast Asian countries. A. paniculata was used as a crucial therapeutic treatment during the influenza epidemic of 1919 in India, and is still used for the treatment of infectious disease in China. A. paniculata produces large quantities of the anti-inflammatory diterpenoid lactones andrographolide and neoandrographolide, and their analogs, which are touted to be the next generation of natural anti-inflammatory medicines for lung diseases, hepatitis, neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmune disorders and inflammatory skin diseases. Here, we report a chromosome-scale A. paniculata genome…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Complete chloroplast genome of the plant Stahlianthus Involucratus (Zingiberaceae)

The first complete chloroplast genome of Stahlianthus involucratus (Zingiberaceae) was reported in this study. The S. involucratus chloroplast genome was 163,300bp in length and consisted of one large sin- gle copy (LSC) region of 87,498bp, one small single copy (SSC) region of 15,568bp, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions 30,117bp. It encoded 141 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes (79 PCG species), 46 tRNA genes (28 tRNA species) and 8 rRNA genes (4 rRNA species). The phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms strongly supported that S. involucratus, Curcuma roscoeana and Curcuma longa formed a cluster in group CurcumaII…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Hedychium coronarium

The first complete chloroplast genome of Hedychium coronarium (Zingiberaceae) was reported in this study. The H. coronarium chloroplast genome was 163,949bp in length and comprised a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions of 29,780bp each, a large single-copy (LSC) region of 88,581bp and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 15,808bp. It encoded 141 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes (79 PCG species), 46 tRNA genes (28 tRNA species), and eight rRNA genes (four rRNA species). The nucleotide composition was asymmetric (31.68% A, 18.35% C, 17.74% G, 32.23% T) with an overall AT content of 63.92%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that H. coronarium…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Complete genome sequence and evolution analysis of Psychrobacter sp. YP14 from Gammaridea Gastrointestinal Microbiota of Yap Trench

Psychrobacter sp. YP14, a moderately psychrophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria, was isolated from Gammaridea Gastrointestinal Microbiota of Yap Trench. The strain has one circular chromosome of 2,895,311 bp with a 44.66% GC content, consisting of 2333 protein-coding genes, 53 tRNA genes and 9 rRNA genes. Four plasmids were completely assembled and their sizes were 13,712 bp, 19711 bp, 36270 bp, 8194 bp, respectively. In particular, a putative open reading frame (ORF) for dienelactone hydrolase (DLH) related to degradation of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. To get an better understanding of the evolution of Psychrobacter sp. YP14 in this genus, six…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Genome data of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 1 and tropical race 4 isolates using long-read sequencing.

Fusarium wilt of banana is caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). We generated two chromosome-level assemblies of Foc race 1 and tropical race 4 strains using single-molecule real-time sequencing. The Foc1 and FocTR4 assemblies had 35 and 29 contigs with contig N50 lengths of 2.08 Mb and 4.28 Mb, respectively. These two new references genomes represent a greater than 100-fold improvement over the contig N50 statistics of the previous short read-based Foc assemblies. The two high-quality assemblies reported here will be a valuable resource for the comparative analysis of Foc races at the pathogenic…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Genome Sequence Resource of a Puccinia striiformis Isolate infecting wheatgrass.

Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis is a disastrous disease of cereal crops and various grasses. To date, fourteen stripe rust genomes are publicly available, including thirteen P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and one P. striiformis f. sp. hordei. In this study, one isolate (11-281) of P. striiformis collected from wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum), which is avirulent to most of standard differential genotypes of wheat and barley, was sequenced, assembled, and annotated. The sequences were assembled to a draft genome of 84.75 Mb, which is comparable to previously sequenced P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and P. striiformis f. sp. hordei isolates.…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Costus viridis (Costaceae)

The first complete chloroplast genome of Costus viridis (Costaceae) was reported in the current study. The C. viridis genome was 168,966bp in length and comprised a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions of 29,166bp each, a large single-copy (LSC) region of 92,189bp, and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 18,445bp. It encoded 133 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes (79 PCG species), 38 tRNA genes (28 tRNA species), and eight rRNA genes (four rRNA species). The overall AT content was 63.75%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that C. viridis was closely related to species Costus osae within the genus Costus in family Costaceae.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the aerobically denitrifying thermophilic bacterium Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1

Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1 is a themophilic bacterium isolated from a biotrickling filter used to treat NOx in Ruiming Power Plant, located in Guangzhou, China, which shows an excellent aerobic denitrification activity at high temperature. The complete genome sequence of this strain was reported in the present study. Genes related to the aerobic denitrification were identified through whole genome analysis. This work will facilitate the mechanism of aerobic denitrification and provide evidence for its potential application in the nitrogen removal.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis J-5, a potential biocontrol agent.

Bacillus subtilis J-5 was isolated from tomato rhizosphere soil and exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea To shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the biological control on phytopathogens, the whole genome of this strain was sequenced. Genes encoding antimicrobial compounds and the regulatory systems were identified in the genome. Copyright © 2017 Jia et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74, isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment

Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74, a psychrotrophic, denitrifying bacterium isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment, uses NO3- or NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source to grow at low temperatures. Here we described the complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74. The genome has one circular chromosome of 5,040,792 bp (61.73 mol% G + C content), consisting of 4747 coding genes, 68 tRNA genes, as well as six rRNA operons as 16S-23S-5S rRNA. According to the annotation results, strain CC6-YY-74 encodes 52 proteins related to nitrogen metabolism, including a complete denitrifying pathway, and more than 20 kinds of hydrolytic enzymes.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequencing and genomic characterization of two Escherichia coli strains co-producing MCR-1 and NDM-1 from bloodstream infection.

We previously described the discovery of two Escherichia coli isolates (EC1002 and EC2474) co-harbouring mcr-1 and bla NDM-1 genes, which were recovered from bloodstream infection in China. More importantly, these antibiotic resistance genes were located on different plasmids and signaling the potential spread of pandrug-resistant bacteria. Here, the complete genome sequences of both isolates were determined using Pacbio RS II and Illumina HiSeq2000 systems. The genome of EC1002 consists of a 5,177,501 base pair chromosome and four circular plasmids, while the genome of EC2474 consists of a 5,013,813 base pair chromosome and three plasmids. The plasmid replicon type of pEC1002_NDM…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSD-2, a microbial germicide isolated from cultivated cotton.

Bacillus subtilis BSD-2, isolated from cotton (Gossypium spp.), had strong antagonistic activity to Verticillium dahlia Kleb and Botrytis cinerea. We sequenced and annotated the BSD-2 complete genome to help us the better use of this strain, which has surfactin, bacilysin, bacillibactin, subtilosin A, Tas A and a potential class IV lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of highly virulent Haemophilus parasuis serotype 11 strain SC1401.

Haemophilus parasuis, a normal Gram-negative bacterium, may cause Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in pigs. This study aims to identify the genes related to natural competence of the serotype 11 strain SC1401, which frequently shows competence and high pathogenicity. SC1401 shows many differences from strains without natural competence within the molecular basis. We performed complete genome sequencing together with restriction modification system analysis to lay the foundation for later study. Copyright © 2016 Dai et al.

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