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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Plasmid-encoded tet(X) genes that confer high-level tigecycline resistance in Escherichia coli.

Tigecycline is one of the last-resort antibiotics to treat complicated infections caused by both multidrug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria1. Tigecycline resistance has sporadically occurred in recent years, primarily due to chromosome-encoding mechanisms, such as overexpression of efflux pumps and ribosome protection2,3. Here, we report the emergence of the plasmid-mediated mobile tigecycline resistance mechanism Tet(X4) in Escherichia coli isolates from China, which is capable of degrading all tetracyclines, including tigecycline and the US FDA newly approved eravacycline. The tet(X4)-harbouring IncQ1 plasmid is highly transferable, and can be successfully mobilized and stabilized in recipient clinical and laboratory strains of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria. It…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The complete chloroplast genome sequence of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.): Genome organization, adaptive evolution and phylogenetic relationships in Cardamineae.

Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), an aquatic leafy vegetable of the Brassicaceae family, is known as a nutritional powerhouse. Here, we de novo sequenced and assembled the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of watercress based on combined PacBio and Illumina data. The cp genome is 155,106?bp in length, exhibiting a typical quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats (IRA and IRB) of 26,505?bp separated by a large single copy (LSC) region of 84,265?bp and a small single copy (SSC) region of 17,831?bp. The genome contained 113 unique genes, including 79 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and 4 rRNAs, with 20 duplicate…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

The genome of an underwater architect, the caddisfly Stenopsyche tienmushanensis Hwang (Insecta: Trichoptera).

Caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) are a highly adapted freshwater group of insects split from a common ancestor with Lepidoptera. They are the most diverse (>16,000 species) of the strictly aquatic insect orders and are widely employed as bio-indicators in water quality assessment and monitoring. Among the numerous adaptations to aquatic habitats, caddisfly larvae use silk and materials from the environment (e.g., stones, sticks, leaf matter) to build composite structures such as fixed retreats and portable cases. Understanding how caddisflies have adapted to aquatic habitats will help explain the evolution and subsequent diversification of the group.We sequenced a retreat-builder caddisfly Stenopsyche tienmushanensis…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Improved high-quality genome assembly and annotation of Tibetan hulless barley

Background The Tibetan hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum), also called textquotedblleftQingketextquotedblright in Chinese and textquotedblleftNetextquotedblright in Tibetan, is the staple food for Tibetans and an important livestock feed in the Tibetan Plateau. The Tibetan hulless barley in China has about 3500 years of cultivation history, mainly produced in Tibet, Qinghai, Sichuan, Yunnan and other areas. In addition, Tibetan hulless barley has rich nutritional value and outstanding health effects, including the beta glucan, dietary fiber, amylopectin, the contents of trace elements, which are higher than any other cereal crops.Findings Here, we reported an improved high-quality assembly of Tibetan hulless…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Long-read sequence assembly of the firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis genome.

Fireflies are a family of insects within the beetle order Coleoptera, or winged beetles, and they are one of the most well-known and loved insect species because of their bioluminescence. However, the firefly is in danger of extinction because of the massive destruction of its living environment. In order to improve the understanding of fireflies and protect them effectively, we sequenced the whole genome of the terrestrial firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis.Here, we developed a highly reliable genome resource for the terrestrial firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis (E. Oliv., 1883; Coleoptera: Lampyridae) using single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing on the PacBio Sequel platform.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete chloroplast genome sequence of tung tree (Vernicia fordii): Organization and phylogenetic relationships with other angiosperms.

Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) is an economically important tree widely cultivated for industrial oil production in China. To better understand the molecular basis of tung tree chloroplasts, we sequenced and characterized its genome using PacBio RS II sequencing platforms. The chloroplast genome was sequenced with 161,528?bp in length, composed with one pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26,819?bp, which were separated by one small single copy (SSC; 18,758?bp) and one large single copy (LSC; 89,132?bp). The genome contains 114 genes, coding for 81 protein, four ribosomal RNAs and 29 transfer RNAs. An expansion with integration of an additional rps19 gene…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Isolation and complete genome sequence of Halorientalis hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov., a hydrocarbon-degrading haloarchaeon.

Bioremediation in hypersaline environments is particularly challenging since the microbes that tolerate such harsh environments and degrade pollutants are quite scarce. Haloarchaea, however, due to their inherent ability to grow at high salt concentrations, hold great promise for remediating the contaminated hypersaline sites. This study aimed to isolate and characterize novel haloarchaeal strains with potentials in hydrocarbon degradation. A haloarchaeal strain IM1011 was isolated from Changlu Tanggu saltern near Da Gang Oilfield in Tianjin (China) by enrichment culture in hypersaline medium containing hexadecane. It could degrade 57 ± 5.2% hexadecane (5 g/L) in the presence of 3.6 M NaCl at 37 °C within 24 days. To…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Eucommia ulmoides: genome structure and evolution.

Eucommia ulmoides is an important traditional medicinal plant that is used for the production of locative Eucommia rubber. In this study, the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of E. ulmoides was obtained by total DNA sequencing; this is the first cp genome sequence of the order Garryales. The cp genome of E. ulmoides was 163,341 bp long and included a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions (31,300 bp), one large single copy (LSC) region (86,592 bp), and one small single copy (SSC) region (14,149 bp). The genome structure and GC content were similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes and contained 115 unique…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the Streptomyces sp. strain CdTB01, a bacterium tolerant to cadmium.

Streptomyces sp. Strain CdTB01, which is tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals, particularly cadmium, was isolated from soil contaminated with heavy metals. Two contigs with total genome size of 10.19Mb were identified in the whole genome sequencing and assembly, and numerous homologous genes known to be involved in heavy metal resistance were found in the genome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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