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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Key experimental evidence of chromosomal DNA transfer among selected tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria.

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driving force of bacterial diversification and evolution. For tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria, the impact of HGT in the emergence and distribution of dominant lineages remains a matter of debate. Here, by using fluorescence-assisted mating assays and whole genome sequencing, we present unique experimental evidence of chromosomal DNA transfer between tubercle bacilli of the early-branching Mycobacterium canettii clade. We found that the obtained recombinants had received multiple donor-derived DNA fragments in the size range of 100 bp to 118 kbp, fragments large enough to contain whole operons. Although the transfer frequency between M. canettii strains was…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pathogenesis of multi drug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis as a determinant of future treatment success.

Multidrug-resistant (MDR)/extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a significant threat to global TB control [1]. In most cases, treatment of MDR/XDR TB is not standardized, and clinicians have adopted a variety of treatment strategies. These strategies include switching to a regimen of new drugs, increasing the dosage of the same drugs, rarely used drugs (which have widespread resistance), etc. Drug resistance is a manmade phenomenon that is driven by treatment strategy (i.e., regimen). These divergent approaches may differentially drive the evolution of bacteria. Some instances of this evolution have already occurred [2]. The community’s focus has been on drug resistance;…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Deciphering the virulence factors of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium colombiense.

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) contains clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria worldwide and is the second largest medical complex in the Mycobacterium genus after the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. MAC comprises several species that are closely phylogenetically related but diverse regarding their host preference, course of disease, virulence and immune response. In this study we provided immunologic and virulence-related insights into the M. colombiense genome as a model of an opportunistic pathogen in the MAC. By using bioinformatic tools we found that M. colombiense has deletions in the genes involved in p-HBA/PDIM/PGL, PLC, SL-1 and HspX production, and loss of the ESX-1 locus. This information…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera strain AH16.

Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes. Copyright © 2016 Hasan et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a type strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, a member of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex.

Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii is a rapidly growing mycobacterial organism for which the taxonomy is unclear. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii type strain. This sequence will provide essential information for future taxonomic and comparative genome studies of these mycobacteria.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.

Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, an infectious disease that affects both animals and humans and thus presents a risk to public health and the livestock industry. Here, we report the genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains that represent major genotype clusters observed in farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.© Crown copyright 2018.

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