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Sunday, July 7, 2019

GenomeLandscaper: Landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps assessing chromosome architecture.

Assessing correctness of an assembled chromosome architecture is a central challenge. We create a geometric analysis method (called GenomeLandscaper) to conduct landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps (GFM), trace large-scale repetitive regions, and assess their impacts on the global architectures of assembled chromosomes. We develop an alignment-free method for phylogenetics analysis. The human Y chromosomes (GRCh.chrY, HuRef.chrY and YH.chrY) are analysed as a proof-of-concept study. We construct a galaxy of genome-fingerprints maps (GGFM) for them, and a landscape compatibility among relatives is observed. But a long sharp straight line on the GGFM breaks such a landscape compatibility, distinguishing GRCh38p1.chrY (and throughout…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

scanPAV: a pipeline for extracting presence-absence variations in genome pairs.

The recent technological advances in genome sequencing techniques have resulted in an exponential increase in the number of sequenced human and non-human genomes. The ever increasing number of assemblies generated by novel de novo pipelines and strategies demands the development of new software to evaluate assembly quality and completeness. One way to determine the completeness of an assembly is by detecting its Presence-Absence variations (PAV) with respect to a reference, where PAVs between two assemblies are defined as the sequences present in one assembly but entirely missing in the other one. Beyond assembly error or technology bias, PAVs can also…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Smooth q-Gram, and its applications to detection of overlaps among long, error-prone sequencing reads

We propose smoothq-gram, the frst variant of q-gram that captures q-gram pair within a small edit distance. We apply smooth q-gram to the problem of detecting overlapping pairs of error-prone reads produced by single molecule real time sequencing (SMRT), which is the frst and most critical step of the de novo fragment assembly of SMRT reads. We have implemented and tested our algorithm on a set of real world benchmarks. Our empirical results demonstrated the signifcant superiority of our algorithm over the existing q-gram based algorithms in accuracy.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Tigmint: correcting assembly errors using linked reads from large molecules.

Genome sequencing yields the sequence of many short snippets of DNA (reads) from a genome. Genome assembly attempts to reconstruct the original genome from which these reads were derived. This task is difficult due to gaps and errors in the sequencing data, repetitive sequence in the underlying genome, and heterozygosity. As a result, assembly errors are common. In the absence of a reference genome, these misassemblies may be identified by comparing the sequencing data to the assembly and looking for discrepancies between the two. Once identified, these misassemblies may be corrected, improving the quality of the assembled sequence. Although tools…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

FusorSV: an algorithm for optimally combining data from multiple structural variation detection methods.

Comprehensive and accurate identification of structural variations (SVs) from next generation sequencing data remains a major challenge. We develop FusorSV, which uses a data mining approach to assess performance and merge callsets from an ensemble of SV-calling algorithms. It includes a fusion model built using analysis of 27 deep-coverage human genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project. We identify 843 novel SV calls that were not reported by the 1000 Genomes Project for these 27 samples. Experimental validation of a subset of these calls yields a validation rate of 86.7%. FusorSV is available at https://github.com/TheJacksonLaboratory/SVE .

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

ARKS: chromosome-scale scaffolding of human genome drafts with linked read kmers.

The long-range sequencing information captured by linked reads, such as those available from 10× Genomics (10xG), helps resolve genome sequence repeats, and yields accurate and contiguous draft genome assemblies. We introduce ARKS, an alignment-free linked read genome scaffolding methodology that uses linked reads to organize genome assemblies further into contiguous drafts. Our approach departs from other read alignment-dependent linked read scaffolders, including our own (ARCS), and uses a kmer-based mapping approach. The kmer mapping strategy has several advantages over read alignment methods, including better usability and faster processing, as it precludes the need for input sequence formatting and draft sequence…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

GtTR: Bayesian estimation of absolute tandem repeat copy number using sequence capture and high throughput sequencing.

Tandem repeats comprise significant proportion of the human genome including coding and regulatory regions. They are highly prone to repeat number variation and nucleotide mutation due to their repetitive and unstable nature, making them a major source of genomic variation between individuals. Despite recent advances in high throughput sequencing, analysis of tandem repeats in the context of complex diseases is still hindered by technical limitations. We report a novel targeted sequencing approach, which allows simultaneous analysis of hundreds of repeats. We developed a Bayesian algorithm, namely – GtTR – which combines information from a reference long-read dataset with a short…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Meeting report: mobile genetic elements and genome plasticity 2018

The Mobile Genetic Elements and Genome Plasticity conference was hosted by Keystone Symposia in Santa Fe, NM USA, February 11–15, 2018. The organizers were Marlene Belfort, Evan Eichler, Henry Levin and Lynn Maquat. The goal of this conference was to bring together scientists from around the world to discuss the function of transposable elements and their impact on host species. Central themes of the meeting included recent innovations in genome analysis and the role of mobile DNA in disease and evolution. The conference included 200 scientists who participated in poster presentations, short talks selected from abstracts, and invited talks. A…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Speeding up DNA sequence alignment by optical correlator

In electronic computers, extensive amount of computations required for searching biological sequences in big databases leads to vast amount of energy consumption for electrical processing and cooling. On the other hand, optical processing is much faster than electrical counterpart, due to its parallel processing capability, at a fraction of energy consumption level and cost. In this regard, this paper proposes a correlation-based optical algorithm using metamaterial, taking advantages of optical parallel processing, to efficiently locate the edits as a means of DNA sequence comparison. Specifically, the proposed algorithm partitions the read DNA sequence into multiple overlapping intervals, referred to as…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Spalter: A meta machine learning approach to distinguish true DNA variants from sequencing artefacts

Being able to distinguish between true DNA variants and technical sequencing artefacts is a fundamental task in whole genome, exome or targeted gene analysis. Variant calling tools provide diagnostic parameters, such as strand bias or an aggregated overall quality for each called variant, to help users make an informed choice about which variants to accept or discard. Having several such quality indicators poses a problem for the users of variant callers because they need to set or adjust thresholds for each such indicator. Alternatively, machine learning methods can be used to train a classifier based on these indicators. This approach…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

STRetch: detecting and discovering pathogenic short tandem repeat expansions.

Short tandem repeat (STR) expansions have been identified as the causal DNA mutation in dozens of Mendelian diseases. Most existing tools for detecting STR variation with short reads do so within the read length and so are unable to detect the majority of pathogenic expansions. Here we present STRetch, a new genome-wide method to scan for STR expansions at all loci across the human genome. We demonstrate the use of STRetch for detecting STR expansions using short-read whole-genome sequencing data at known pathogenic loci as well as novel STR loci. STRetch is open source software, available from github.com/Oshlack/STRetch .

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Picky comprehensively detects high-resolution structural variants in nanopore long reads.

Acquired genomic structural variants (SVs) are major hallmarks of cancer genomes, but they are challenging to reconstruct from short-read sequencing data. Here we exploited the long reads of the nanopore platform using our customized pipeline, Picky ( https://github.com/TheJacksonLaboratory/Picky ), to reveal SVs of diverse architecture in a breast cancer model. We identified the full spectrum of SVs with superior specificity and sensitivity relative to short-read analyses, and uncovered repetitive DNA as the major source of variation. Examination of genome-wide breakpoints at nucleotide resolution uncovered micro-insertions as the common structural features associated with SVs. Breakpoint density across the genome is associated…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

iMGEins: detecting novel mobile genetic elements inserted in individual genomes.

Recent advances in sequencing technology have allowed us to investigate personal genomes to find structural variations, which have been studied extensively to identify their association with the physiology of diseases such as cancer. In particular, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) are one of the major constituents of the human genomes, and cause genome instability by insertion, mutation, and rearrangement.We have developed a new program, iMGEins, to identify such novel MGEs by using sequencing reads of individual genomes, and to explore the breakpoints with the supporting reads and MGEs detected. iMGEins is the first MGE detection program that integrates three algorithmic components:…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Bridging gaps in transposable element research with single-molecule and single-cell technologies

More than half of the genomic landscape in humans and many other organisms is composed of repetitive DNA, which mostly derives from transposable elements (TEs) and viruses. Recent technological advances permit improved assessment of the repetitive content across genomes and newly developed molecular assays have revealed important roles of TEs and viruses in host genome evolution and organization. To update on our current understanding of TE biology and to promote new interdisciplinary strategies for the TE research community, leading experts gathered for the 2nd Uppsala Transposon Symposium on October 4–5, 2018 in Uppsala, Sweden. Using cutting-edge single-molecule and single-cell approaches,…

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: HGAP4 de novo assembly application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP4) de novo assembly analysis application. HGAP4 generates accurate de novo assemblies using only PacBio data. HGAP4 is suitable for assembling a wide range of genome sizes and complexity. HGAP4 now includes some support for diploid-aware assembly.

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