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Friday, July 19, 2019

Single-molecule sequencing of the desiccation-tolerant grass Oropetium thomaeum.

Plant genomes, and eukaryotic genomes in general, are typically repetitive, polyploid and heterozygous, which complicates genome assembly. The short read lengths of early Sanger and current next-generation sequencing platforms hinder assembly through complex repeat regions, and many draft and reference genomes are fragmented, lacking skewed GC and repetitive intergenic sequences, which are gaining importance due to projects like the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). Here we report the whole-genome sequencing and assembly of the desiccation-tolerant grass Oropetium thomaeum. Using only single-molecule real-time sequencing, which generates long (>16?kilobases) reads with random errors, we assembled 99% (244?megabases) of the Oropetium genome into…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Genome sequencing: Long reads for a short plant

The genome of a tiny resurrection plant has been sequenced using PacBio’s long-read single-molecule real-time sequencing technology, aiding the understanding of extreme desiccation tolerance. The genome contiguity is comparable to that of genomes sequenced using far more laborious approaches.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genus Brachypodium as a model for perenniality and polyploidy

The genus Brachypodium contains annual and perennial species with both diploid and polyploid genomes. Like the annual species B. distachyon, some of the perennial and polyploid species have traits compatible with use as a model system (e.g. small genomes, rapid generation time, self-fertile and easy to grow). Thus, there is an opportunity to leverage the resources and knowledge developed for B. distachyon to use other Brachypodium species as models for perenniality and the regulation and evolution of polyploid genomes. There are two factors driving an increased interest in perenniality. First, several perennial grasses are being developed as biomass crops for…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Brachypodium distachyon reference genome

Grasses provide the bulk of human calories but improvement in grass yields is hindered by the characteristically large and complex genomes of these species; the genomes of wheat, maize, and sugar cane are 17,000, 2300, and 10,000 Mb, respectively. Brachypodium distachyon has one of the smallest genomes of all grasses at 272 Mb, and a number of key traits that make it a good model grass. Brachypodium was the fourth sequenced grass genome, after rice, Sorghum, and maize, and was the first sequenced in the Pooideae subfamily, a diverse group that includes wheat, barley, oat, and rye. The Brachypodium genome…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis strain DSM46306, a gram-positive bacterial pathogen of grasses.

We announce the complete genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis, a vascular pathogen of Bermuda grass. The species also comprises Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, a sugarcane pathogen. Since these two subspecies have genome sequences available, a comparative analysis will contribute to our understanding of the differences in their biology and host specificity.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

New insights into structural organization and gene duplication in a 1.75-Mb genomic region harboring the a-gliadin gene family in Aegilops tauschii, the source of wheat D genome.

Among the wheat prolamins important for its end-use traits, a-gliadins are the most abundant, and are also a major cause of food-related allergies and intolerances. Previous studies of various wheat species estimated that between 25 and 150 a-gliadin genes reside in the Gli-2 locus regions. To better understand the evolution of this complex gene family, the DNA sequence of a 1.75-Mb genomic region spanning the Gli-2 locus was analyzed in the diploid grass, Aegilops tauschii, the ancestral source of D genome in hexaploid bread wheat. Comparison with orthologous regions from rice, sorghum, and Brachypodium revealed rapid and dynamic changes only…

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