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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genetic variation of Pyrenophora teres f. teres isolates in Western Australia and emergence of a Cyp51A fungicide resistance mutation

Genome-wide, unlinked, simple sequence repeat markers were used to examine genetic variation and relationships within Pyrenophora teres f. teres, a common pathogen of barley, in Western Australia. Despite the region’s geographic isolation, the isolates showed relatively high allelic variation compared to similar studies, averaging 7.11 alleles per locus. Principal component, Bayesian clustering and distance differentiation parameters provided evidence for both regional genotypic subdivision together with juxtaposing of isolates possessing different genetic backgrounds. Genotyping of fungicide resistant Cyp51A isolates indicated a single mutation event occurred followed by recombination and long-distance regional dispersal over hundreds of kilometres. Selection of recently emergent favourable…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Rationally designed perturbation factor drives evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for industrial application.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with favorable characteristics are preferred for application in industries. However, the current ability to reprogram a yeast cell on the genome scale is limited due to the complexity of yeast ploids. In this study, a method named genome replication engineering-assisted continuous evolution (GREACE) was proved efficient in engineering S. cerevisiae with different ploids. Through iterative cycles of culture coupled with selection, GREACE could continuously improve the target traits of yeast by accumulating beneficial genetic modification in genome. The application of GREACE greatly improved the tolerance of yeast against acetic acid compared with their parent strain. This method…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolutionary emergence of drug resistance in Candida opportunistic pathogens.

Fungal infections, such as candidiasis caused by Candida, pose a problem of growing medical concern. In developed countries, the incidence of Candida infections is increasing due to the higher survival of susceptible populations, such as immunocompromised patients or the elderly. Existing treatment options are limited to few antifungal drug families with efficacies that vary depending on the infecting species. In this context, the emergence and spread of resistant Candida isolates are being increasingly reported. Understanding how resistance can evolve within naturally susceptible species is key to developing novel, more effective treatment strategies. However, in contrast to the situation of antibiotic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Traditional Norwegian kveik are a genetically distinct group of domesticated Saccharomyces cerevisiae brewing yeasts.

The widespread production of fermented food and beverages has resulted in the domestication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts specifically adapted to beer production. While there is evidence beer yeast domestication was accelerated by industrialization of beer, there also exists a farmhouse brewing culture in western Norway which has passed down yeasts referred to as kveik for generations. This practice has resulted in ale yeasts which are typically highly flocculant, phenolic off flavor negative (POF-), and exhibit a high rate of fermentation, similar to previously characterized lineages of domesticated yeast. Additionally, kveik yeasts are reportedly high-temperature tolerant, likely due to the traditional…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Approximate, simultaneous comparison of microbial genome architectures via syntenic anchoring of quiver representations

Motivation A long-standing limitation in comparative genomic studies is the dependency on a reference genome, which hinders the spectrum of genetic diversity that can be identified across a population of organisms. This is especially true in the microbial world where genome architectures can significantly vary. There is therefore a need for computational methods that can simultaneously analyze the architectures of multiple genomes without introducing bias from a reference. Results In this article, we present Ptolemy: a novel method for studying the diversity of genome architectures—such as structural variation and pan-genomes—across a collection of microbial assemblies without the need of a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Single-phase PacBio de novo assembly of the genome of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a pathogen of Amphibia.

Here, we present an updated genome assembly of the diploid chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis strain RTP6. This strain is part of the global panzootic lineage (BdGPL) and was isolated in Dunedin, New Zealand. The assembly was generated using PacBio long-read and Illumina short-read data, allowing for the accurate phasing of heterozygosities.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The gold-standard genome of Aspergillus niger NRRL 3 enables a detailed view of the diversity of sugar catabolism in fungi.

The fungal kingdom is too large to be discovered exclusively by classical genetics. The access to omics data opens a new opportunity to study the diversity within the fungal kingdom and how adaptation to new environments shapes fungal metabolism. Genomes are the foundation of modern science but their quality is crucial when analysing omics data. In this study, we demonstrate how one gold-standard genome can improve functional prediction across closely related species to be able to identify key enzymes, reactions and pathways with the focus on primary carbon metabolism. Based on this approach we identified alternative genes encoding various steps…

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Tutorial: HGAP4 de novo assembly application

This tutorial provides an overview of the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP4) de novo assembly analysis application. HGAP4 generates accurate de novo assemblies using only PacBio data. HGAP4 is suitable for assembling a wide range of genome sizes and complexity. HGAP4 now includes some support for diploid-aware assembly.

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