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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum ATCC 49418(T.).

Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease and rainbow trout fry mortality syndrome in salmonid fishes and is associated with significant losses in the aquaculture industry. The virulence factors and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of F. psychrophilum are poorly understood. Moreover, at the present time, there are no effective vaccines and control using antimicrobial agents is problematic due to growing antimicrobial resistance and the fact that sick fish don’t eat. In the hopes of identifying vaccine and therapeutic targets, we sequenced the genome of the type strain ATCC 49418 which was isolated from the kidney of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genomes of two strains of flavobacterium isolated from Lake Washington sediment.

We report sequencing the genomes of two new Flavobacterium strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment. From genomic contents, versatile lifestyles were predicted but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of their genomic sequences, the new Flavobacterium strains present prospective models for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. Copyright © 2015 McTaggart et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Potential mechanisms of attenuation for rifampicin-passaged strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease in salmonids. Earlier research showed that a rifampicin-passaged strain of F. psychrophilum (CSF 259-93B.17) caused no disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) while inducing a protective immune response against challenge with the virulent CSF 259-93 strain. We hypothesized that rifampicin passage leads to an accumulation of genomic mutations that, by chance, reduce virulence. To assess the pattern of phenotypic and genotypic changes associated with passage, we examined proteomic, LPS and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences for two F. psychrophilum strains (CSF 259-93 and THC 02-90) that were passaged with and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of the multi-drug-resistant clinical isolate Myroides odoratimimus PR63039.

Myroides odoratimimus (M. odoratimimus) has been gradually implicated as an important nosocomial pathogen that poses a serious health threat to immunocompromised patients owing to its multi-drug resistance. However, the resistance mechanism is currently unclear. To clarify the antibiotic resistance and infectivity mechanisms of M. odoratimimus, whole genome sequencing was performed on the multi-drug-resistant M. odoratimimus strain PR63039. The genome sequence was completed with single molecule real-time (SMRT) technologies. Then, annotation was performed using RAST and IMG-ER. A number of databases and software programs were used to analyze the genomic characteristics, including GC-Profile, ISfinder, CG viewer, ARDB, CARD, ResFinder, the VFDB…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Lutibacter profundi LP1T isolated from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent system

Lutibacter profundi LP1T within the family Flavobacteriaceae was isolated from a biofilm growing on the surface of a black smoker chimney at the Loki’s Castle vent field, located on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge. The complete genome of L. profundi LP1T is the first genome to be published within the genus Lutibacter. L. profundi LP1T consists of a single 2,966,978 bp circular chromosome with a GC content of 29.8%. The genome comprises 2,537 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA species and 2 rRNA operons. The microaerophilic, organotrophic isolate contains genes for all central carbohydrate metabolic pathways. However, genes for the oxidative branch of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization of potential polysaccharide utilization systems in the marine bacteroidetes Gramella flava JLT2011 using a multi-omics approach.

Members of phylum Bacteroidetes are distributed across diverse marine niches and Flavobacteria is often the predominant bacterial class decomposing algae-derived polysaccharides. Here, we report the complete genome of Gramella flava JLT2011 (Flavobacteria) isolated from surface water of the southeastern Pacific. A remarkable genomic feature is that the number of glycoside hydrolase (GH) genes in the genome of G. flava JLT2011 is more than 2-fold higher than that of other Gramella species. The functional profiles of the GHs suggest extensive variation in Gramella species. Growth experiments revealed that G. flava JLT2011 has the ability to utilize a wide range of polysaccharides…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Maribacter sp. T28, a polysaccharide-degrading marine flavobacteria.

The degradation of plant polysaccharides by enzymes is an industry of increasing importance. Here we present the complete genome sequence of a marine flavobacteria, Maribacter sp. T28 (=CGMCC 1.15788). The genome comprises 4,271,158bp in a circular chromosome with a G+C content of 34.4% and contains genes encoding xylanolytic, alginolytic and pectinolytic enzymes. Genes encoding alginate lyases and a pectin degradation protein (kdgF) are located on a polysaccharide utilization locus. Maribacter sp. T28 has the ability to utilize xylan, alginate and pectin for growth. The key degradation products xylose and 2-keto-3- deoxy-gluconate were detected from xylan and pectin, respectively. The Maribacter…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genome analysis of the Flavobacteriales bacterium strain UJ101, isolated from the gut of Atergatis reticulatus.

Here we report the comparative genomic analysis of strain UJ101 with 15 strains from the family Flavobacteriaceae, using the CGExplorer program. Flavobacteriales bacterium strain UJ101 was isolated from a xanthid crab, Atergatis reticulatus, from the East Sea near Korea. The complete genome of strain UJ101 is a 3,074,209 bp, single, circular chromosome with 30.74% GC content. While the UJ101 genome contains a number of annotated genes for many metabolic pathways, such as the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the glyoxylate cycle, genes for the Entner-Douddoroff pathway are not found in the UJ101 genome.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum provides insights into virulence mechanisms.

Tenacibaculum maritimum is a devastating bacterial pathogen of wild and farmed marine fish with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution. We report here the complete genome sequence of the T. maritimum type strain NCIMB 2154(T). The genome consists of a 3,435,971-base pair circular chromosome with 2,866 predicted protein-coding genes. Genes encoding the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, the type IX secretion system, iron uptake systems, adhesins, hemolysins, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases were identified. They are likely involved in the virulence process including immune escape, invasion, colonization, destruction of host tissues, and nutrient scavenging. Among the predicted virulence factors, type IX…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the proteorhodopsin-containing marine bacterium Sediminicola sp. YIK13.

Sediminicola sp. YIK13 is a marine flavobacterium, isolated from tidal flat sediment. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of this genus, which consists of 3,569,807 bp with 39.4% GC content. This strain contains proteorhodopsin, as well as retinal biosynthesis genes, allowing it to utilize sunlight as an energy source. Copyright © 2016 Kwon and Kim.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare Pf1

Flavobacterium columnare is the etiologic agent of columnaris disease, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industry. Here, we describe the complete genome of F. columnare strain Pf1, a highly virulent strain isolated from yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) in China. Copyright © 2016 Zhang et al.

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