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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Conference: Automated, non-hybrid de novo genome assemblies and epigenomes of bacterial pathogens

Jonas Korlach, CSO of PacBio, discusses the revival of finished genomes the microbial community will see with long read data, emphasizing that for certain organisms such as rapidly evolving microbes, having a de novo finished genome will be more useful than creating a draft based on a previous related reference genome. Korlach describes two bioinformatic methods from PacBio, a hierarchical genome assembly process (HGAP) and an consensus caller (Quiver), which are used to generate finished genomes from just long-read PacBio data, with final genome sequence accuracies over 99.999%. Korlach demonstrates the ability of PacBio data to generate closed, high-quality de…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Seminar: Optimizing eukaryotic de novo genome assembly with long-read sequencing

This seminar features great hands-on information and best practices for analyzing SMRT Sequencing data for eukaryotic genome assembly. Michael Schatz provides an overview of the assembly tools, provides recommendations for when to use each one, and discusses the challenges of short-read assemblies. James Gurtowski gives an in-depth overview of hybrid assemblies methods, where short read data are used used to correct errors in longer reads. Finally, Sergey Koren presents on chromosome-scale assembly, including the MinHash Alignment Process (MHAP) he developed to dramatically reduce the computational processing power required for genome assemblies.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: DNA quality requirements for single-molecule sequencing

Dr. Olga Vinnere Pettersson, Uppsala Genome Center (Uppsala University), presents best practices for qualifying genomic DNA from a variety of sources to be suitable for Single Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing. Factors that affect single molecule sequencing and recommendations for extracting high-quality genomic DNA will be described. (requires file download to view)

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Podcast: Long-read sequencing dramatically improves blood matching – Steven Marsh

One of the popular questions on the Mendelspod program is how those doing sequencing decide between the quality of PacBio’s long reads and the cheaper short read technology, such as that of Illumina or Thermo Fisher. Steve Marsh, the Director of Bioinformatics at the Anthony Nolan Research Institute in London, provides the most clear and dramatic answer yet: use the PacBio system exclusively. Established in 1974 by the mother of a boy with a rare blood disease, the Anthony Nolan Institute is a world leader in blood crossmatching and donor/patient registries. Steve and his team at the Institute have dramatically…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Of reference genomes and precious metals

Rick Wilson, Director of the McDonnell Genome Institute at Washington University in St. Louis titled his talk “Of reference genomes and precious metals” and walked the audience through definitions and standards for the various quality levels for de novo assembled human genomes, e.g., platinum, gold, and silver. He noted that this was a good topic for this session because of the important role PacBio has played in the community’s work to create reference-grade genomes. For example, PacBio technology has enabled them to sequence additional genomes (CHM1, CHM13) to a very high quality level. Although these sequences were essential for further…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Medical diagnostic challenges and structural variation detection using the PacBio Platform

Richard Gibbs, Director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Human Genome Sequencing Center, talked about the transition to genomic medicine. This hasn’t been as simple as people would like due to such issues as the incomplete reference genome, the difficulty in characterizing some variation, and the lack of knowledge about the function of some genes. At Baylor, most of the human genome sequencing is done for children with Mendelian disorders. He said that among 7,000 samples processed using short-read exome sequencing, only about 25% of these cases are solved. The relatively low diagnosis rate is likely due to structural variation and…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Going beyond the $1,000 genome? – the future of high quality de novo human genomes, epigenomes and transcriptomes?

Jonas Korlach, Chief Scientific Officer at PacBio, discussed the technology waves that have followed the initial human genome sequencing project, where we are today, and where we are going. Today, we are in what Korlach calls the 4th wave, where more comprehensive whole-genome re-sequencing is occurring, and we are nearing the 5th, when we will actually be able to free ourselves from reference genomes and sequence everything de novo.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: A-maize-ing time for plant science – SMRT Sequencing of the maize genome and transcriptome

Doreen Ware introduces her team’s new assembly of maize, built with PacBio long-read sequencing and genome maps from BioNano Genomics. With a contig N50 of nearly 10 Mb and more complete information than any previous assembly, Ware says, “This is just an amazing time to be a plant scientist.” Her presentation includes a number of highlights from the new assembly, which may help crop improvement efforts for maize.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Roche and PacBio Workshop: Towards precision medicine

Euan Ashley speaks about precision medicine and said clinical-grade analysis has been limited by complex regions in the human genome. His key theme,”Precision medicine needs to be accurate medicine,” was illustrated with several examples where short-read sequencing or traditional clinical sequencing methods failed to be accurate. Also included: targeted RNA sequencing and gene phasing with long-read sequencing.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Conference: Long-read sequence of the gorilla genome

Christopher Hill presents data from efforts to produce reference-grade assemblies for the great ape species. Using SMRT Sequencing, Hill and his colleagues are generating assemblies with much higher contiguity to resolve repetitive and other particularly complex regions. In this talk, he focuses on data from their new high-quality gorilla assembly.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Roche and PacBio Workshop: Leveraging SMRT Sequencing technology for developing niche assays with diagnostic potential

Robert Sebra reports the use of SMRT Sequencing at the Icahn Institute and presents some early data from the new Sequel System. Topics include: Targeted sequencing applications for CYP2D6 metabolism and Gaucher disease, tandem repeat detection in FTD/ALS patients, structural variation detection for Goldenhar Syndrome, inverted PCR assays for detection of DNA damage in Glioblastome, whole gene BRCA sequencing, and sensitive somatic variant detection in heterogeneous tissues.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG Virtual Poster: Effect of coverage depth and haplotype phasing on structural variant detection with PacBio long reads

PacBio bioinformatician Aaron Wenger presents this ASHG 2016 poster demonstrating human structural variation detection at varying coverage levels with SMRT Sequencing on the Sequel System. Results were compared to truth sets for well-characterized genomes. Results indicate that even low coverage of SMRT Sequencing makes it possible to detect hundreds of SVs that are missed in high-coverage short-read sequencing data.

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