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Thursday, November 12, 2020

Case Study: Pioneering a pan-genome reference collection

At DuPont Pioneer, DNA sequencing is paramount for R&D to reveal the genetic basis for traits of interest in commercial crops such as maize, soybean, sorghum, sunflower, alfalfa, canola, wheat, rice, and others. They cannot afford to wait the years it has historically taken for high-quality reference genomes to be produced. Nor can they rely on a single reference to represent the genetic diversity in its germplasm.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG Conference: String graph assembly for diploid genomes with long reads

Jason Chin, senior director of bioinformatics at PacBio, talks about using long-read sequence data and string graph assembly for assembling diploid genomes. A major challenge for diploid genome assembly is in distinguishing homologous regions from repeats, so he discusses how long reads are essential for resolving repeat regions. In the presentation, Chin displays data from two inbred Arabidopsis strains used to create a synthetic diploid assembly.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Going beyond the $1,000 genome? – the future of high quality de novo human genomes, epigenomes and transcriptomes?

Jonas Korlach, Chief Scientific Officer at PacBio, discussed the technology waves that have followed the initial human genome sequencing project, where we are today, and where we are going. Today, we are in what Korlach calls the 4th wave, where more comprehensive whole-genome re-sequencing is occurring, and we are nearing the 5th, when we will actually be able to free ourselves from reference genomes and sequence everything de novo.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG Virtual Poster: De novo assembly of a diploid Asian genome

Yunfei Guo, from the University of Southern California, presents his ASHG 2015 poster on a de novo assembly of a diploid Asian genome. The uniform coverage of long-read sequencing helped access regions previously unresolvable due to high GC bias or long repeats. The assembly allowed scientists to fill some 400 gaps in the latest human reference genome, including some as long as 50 kb.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Diploid genome assembly and comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstruction

Jason Chin, senior director of bioinformatics at PacBio, talks about using long-read sequence data to generate diploid genome assemblies to produce comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstructions. In the presentation, Chin describes the FALCON Unzip process that combines SNP phasing with the assembly process and allows for determination of the haplotype sequences and identification of structural variants. He presents an example of diploid assembly from inbred Arabidopsis strains.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: A-maize-ing time for plant science – SMRT Sequencing of the maize genome and transcriptome

Doreen Ware introduces her team’s new assembly of maize, built with PacBio long-read sequencing and genome maps from BioNano Genomics. With a contig N50 of nearly 10 Mb and more complete information than any previous assembly, Ware says, “This is just an amazing time to be a plant scientist.” Her presentation includes a number of highlights from the new assembly, which may help crop improvement efforts for maize.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Conference: The first African reference genome assembly

Karyn Meltz Steinberg presents the first high quality African reference genome assembly of the Yoruban individual, NA19240, produced from SMRT Sequencing data. She said PacBio sequencing offers significant improvement over short-read sequence data for high-quality assemblies.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Virtual Poster: Unzipping diploid genomes – revealing all kinds of heterozygous variants from comprehensive haplotig assemblies

In this AGBT virtual poster video, Jason Chin, a bioinformatician at PacBio, describes a polyploidy-aware de novo assembly approach called FALCON and a new algorithm, dubbed FALCON-unzip, that involves “unzipping” diploid genomes for de novo haplotype reconstructions from SMRT Sequencing data. These methods are illustrated in a studies of fungal, Arabidopsis and human datasets for the resolution of structural variation and characterization of haplotypes.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

i5K Webinar: High-quality de novo insect genome assemblies using PacBio sequencing

PacBio Sequencing is characterized by very long sequence reads (averaging > 10,000 bases), lack of GC-bias, and high consensus accuracy. These features have allowed the method to provide a new gold standard in de novo genome assemblies, producing highly contiguous (contig N50 > 1 Mb) and accurate (> QV 50) genome assemblies. We will briefly describe the technology and then highlight the full workflow, from sample preparation through sequencing to data analysis, on examples of insect genome assemblies, and illustrate the difference these high-quality genomes represent with regard to biological insights, compared to fragmented draft assemblies generated by short-read sequencing.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: A future of high-quality genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenomes

Jonas Korlach spoke about recent SMRT Sequencing updates, such as latest Sequel System chemistry release (1.2.1) and updates to the Integrative Genomics Viewer that’s now update optimized for PacBio data. He presented the recent data release of structural variation detected in the NA12878 genome, including many more insertions and deletions than short-read-based technologies were able to find.

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