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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genomic landscape of the verrucomicrobial methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV.

Aerobic methanotrophs can grow in hostile volcanic environments and use methane as their sole source of energy. The discovery of three verrucomicrobial Methylacidiphilum strains has revealed diverse metabolic pathways used by these methanotrophs, including mechanisms through which methane is oxidized. The basis of a complete understanding of these processes and of how these bacteria evolved and are able to thrive in such extreme environments partially resides in the complete characterization of their genome and its architecture.In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV, obtained using Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. The genome assembles…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of 10 strains of the genus exiguobacterium.

High-quality draft genome sequences were determined for 10 Exiguobacterium strains in order to provide insight into their evolutionary strategies for speciation and environmental adaptation. The selected genomes include psychrotrophic and thermophilic species from a range of habitats, which will allow for a comparison of metabolic pathways and stress response genes. Copyright © 2014 Vishnivetskaya et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome of the intracellular bacterium of the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum: a blueprint for thriving in and out of symbiosis

BACKGROUND:Symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and marine invertebrates are rare examples of living systems that are virtually independent of photosynthetic primary production. These associations have evolved multiple times in marine habitats, such as deep-sea hydrothermal vents and reducing sediments, characterized by steep gradients of oxygen and reduced chemicals. Due to difficulties associated with maintaining these symbioses in the laboratory and culturing the symbiotic bacteria, studies of chemosynthetic symbioses rely heavily on culture independent methods. The symbiosis between the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum, and its intracellular symbiont is a model for chemosynthetic symbioses given its accessibility in intertidal environments and the ability…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Cellulophaga lytica HI1 using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing.

We report here the complete genome sequence of Cellulophaga lytica HI1 isolated from a seawater table located at the Kewalo Marine Laboratory (Honolulu, HI). This is the first complete de novo genome assembly of C. lytica HI1 using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing, which resulted in a single scaffold of 3.8 Mb. Copyright © 2014 Asahina and Hadfield.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of Vibrio navarrensis, a potential human pathogen.

Vibrio navarrensis is an aquatic bacterium recently shown to be associated with human illness. We report the first genome sequences of three V. navarrensis strains obtained from clinical and environmental sources. Preliminary analyses of the sequences reveal that V. navarrensis contains genes commonly associated with virulence in other human pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Gladney et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5(T) (=DSM 16299(T)), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterium for bacterial biofertilizer.

Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5(T) (=DSM 16299(T)), isolated from the rhizospheric soil of grass growing in Spain, has been reported as a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas harboring insoluble phosphorus solubilizing activity. To understanding the multifunctional biofertilizer better, we report the complete genome sequence of P. rhizosphaerae IH5(T). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence for the shellfish pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 isolated from a shellfish hatchery.

Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp) and two megaplasmids (380,714 and 319,400 bp). Copyright © 2014 Richards et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the lignin-degrading bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2.

In an effort to discover anaerobic bacteria capable of lignin degradation, we isolated Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 on minimal media with alkali lignin as the sole carbon source. This organism was isolated anaerobically from tropical forest soils collected from the Bisley watershed at the Ridge site in the El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, USA, part of the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Station. At this site, the soils experience strong fluctuations in redox potential and are characterized by cycles of iron oxidation and reduction. Genome sequencing was targeted because of its ability to grow on lignin anaerobically and lignocellulolytic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of a metabolically diverse Antarctic supraglacial stream organism, Polaromonas sp. strain CG9_12, determined using Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Technology.

Polaromonas species are found in a diversity of environments and are particularly common in icy ecosystems. Polaromonas sp. strain CG9_12 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, catalase-positive, white-pigmented bacterium of the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Polaromonas sp. strain CG9_12, isolated from an Antarctic supraglacial stream. Copyright © 2014 Smith et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomes of diverse isolates of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus.

The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the numerically dominant photosynthetic organism in the oligotrophic oceans, and a model system in marine microbial ecology. Here we report 27 new whole genome sequences (2 complete and closed; 25 of draft quality) of cultured isolates, representing five major phylogenetic clades of Prochlorococcus. The sequenced strains were isolated from diverse regions of the oceans, facilitating studies of the drivers of microbial diversity-both in the lab and in the field. To improve the utility of these genomes for comparative genomics, we also define pre-computed clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs), indicating how genes are distributed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Distribution and diversity of Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs in geothermal and acidic environments.

Recently, methanotrophic members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia have been described, but little is known about their distribution in nature. We surveyed methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs and acidic wetlands via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were found in samples covering a broad temperature range (22.5-81.6°C), but only in acidic conditions (pH 1.8-5.0) and only in geothermal environments, not in acidic bogs or fens. Phylogenetically, three 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters of putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were observed. Those detected in high-temperature geothermal samples (44.1-81.6°C) grouped with known thermoacidiphilic ‘Methylacidiphilum’ isolates. A second group dominated in moderate-temperature geothermal…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the Leisingera aquimarina type strain (DSM 24565(T)), a member of the marine Roseobacter clade rich in extrachromosomal elements.

Leisingera aquimarina Vandecandelaere et al. 2008 is a member of the genomically well characterized Roseobacter clade within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine Roseobacter clade are metabolically versatile and involved in carbon fixation and biogeochemical processes. They form a physiologically heterogeneous group, found predominantly in coastal or polar waters, especially in symbiosis with algae, in microbial mats, in sediments or associated with invertebrates. Here we describe the features of L. aquimarina DSM 24565(T) together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation. The 5,344,253 bp long genome consists of one chromosome and an unusually high number of seven extrachromosomal elements…

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