fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of a natural root isolate, Bacillus subtilis UD1022, a potential plant growth-promoting biocontrol agent.

Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the phylum Firmicutes, is the most widely studied Gram-positive model organism. It is found in a wide variety of environments and is particularly abundant in soils and in the gastrointestinal tracts of ruminants and humans. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the newly described B. subtilis strain UD1022. The UD1022 genome consists of a 4.025-Mbp chromosome, and other major findings from our analysis will provide insights into the genomic basis of it being a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol potential. Copyright © 2015 Bishnoi et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the petroleum-emulsifying bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri SLG510A3-8.

Pseudomonas stutzeri SLG510A3-8, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Shengli Oilfield, China, has the potential to be applied for microbial enhanced oil recovery. Here, we reported the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. It has a 4,650,155bp circular chromosome encoding 4450 genes, and the genome consists of genes that are involved in denitrification, chemotaxis, benzoate degradation, molecule transportation, and other functions. The genome contains a complete set of genes for type I secretion system in comparison with sequences of other P. stutzeri strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Azotobacter genomes: The genome of Azotobacter chroococcum NCIMB 8003 (ATCC 4412).

The genome of the soil-dwelling heterotrophic N2-fixing Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum NCIMB 8003 (ATCC 4412) (Ac-8003) has been determined. It consists of 7 circular replicons totalling 5,192,291 bp comprising a circular chromosome of 4,591,803 bp and six plasmids pAcX50a, b, c, d, e, f of 10,435 bp, 13,852, 62,783, 69,713, 132,724, and 311,724 bp respectively. The chromosome has a G+C content of 66.27% and the six plasmids have G+C contents of 58.1, 55.3, 56.7, 59.2, 61.9, and 62.6% respectively. The methylome has also been determined and 5 methylation motifs have been identified. The genome also contains a very high number…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a, a hydrocarbon-degrading and exopolymeric substance-producing bacterium.

Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a was isolated from coastal sea surface water based on its ability to utilize n-hexadecane. During growth in marine medium the strain produces an amphiphilic exopolymeric substance (EPS) amended with glucose, which emulsifies a variety of oil hydrocarbon substrates. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,979,193 bp with 4,614 genes and an average G+C content of 55.0%. Copyright © 2015 Gutierrez et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Deinococcus soli N5(T), a gamma-radiation- resistant bacterium isolated from rice field in South Korea.

A Gram-negative, non-motile and short-rod shaped and gamma-radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus soli N5(T), isolated from a rice field soil in South Korea. The complete genome of D. soli N5(T) consists of a chromosome (3,236,984bp). The key enzymes for the central DNA repair mechanisms were present in the genome. The enzyme coding genes has been identified which is involving in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The gene cluster in the genome sequence suggest that the D. soli N5(T) use (NER) pathways for efficient removal of pyrimidine dimers that are the most abundant type of UV- induced damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, a desert isolate with broad-spectrum antagonism against soilborne phytopathogens.

Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants. Copyright © 2015 Köberl et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus environmental strain UCM-V493.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading bacterial cause of seafood-related gastroenteritis in the world. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of an environmental strain of V. parahaemolyticus, UCM-V493, with the aim of understanding the differences between the clinical and environmental isolates of the bacteria. We also make some preliminary sequence comparisons with the clinical strain RIMD2210633.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the e-poly-L-lysine-producing strain Streptomyces albulus NK660, isolated from soil in Gutian, Fujian Province, China.

We determined the complete genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Streptomyces albulus NK660. It can produce e-poly-l-lysine, which has antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of microorganisms. The genome of S. albulus NK660 contains a 9,360,281-bp linear chromosome and a 12,120-bp linear plasmid. Copyright © 2014 Gu et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Compact genome of the Antarctic midge is likely an adaptation to an extreme environment.

The midge, Belgica antarctica, is the only insect endemic to Antarctica, and thus it offers a powerful model for probing responses to extreme temperatures, freeze tolerance, dehydration, osmotic stress, ultraviolet radiation and other forms of environmental stress. Here we present the first genome assembly of an extremophile, the first dipteran in the family Chironomidae, and the first Antarctic eukaryote to be sequenced. At 99 megabases, B. antarctica has the smallest insect genome sequenced thus far. Although it has a similar number of genes as other Diptera, the midge genome has very low repeat density and a reduction in intron length.…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus MTCC B6033.

Bacillus pumilus is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium isolated from the soil. B. pumilus strain B6033 was originally selected as a biocatalyst for the stereospecific oxidation of ß-lactams. Here, we present a 3.8-Mb assembly of its genome, which is the second fully assembled genome of a B. pumilus strain.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing technology.

Pelosinus species can reduce metals such as Fe(III), U(VI), and Cr(VI) and have been isolated from diverse geographical regions. Five draft genome sequences have been published. We report the complete genome sequence for Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 using only PacBio DNA sequence data and without manual finishing. Copyright © 2014 Brown et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the chromate-resistant bacterium Leucobacter salsicius type strain M1-8(T.).

Leucobacter salsicius M1-8(T) is a member of the Microbacteriaceae family within the class Actinomycetales. This strain is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium and was previously isolated from a Korean fermented food. Most members of the genus Leucobacter are chromate-resistant and this feature could be exploited in biotechnological applications. However, the genus Leucobacter is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. Thus, the present study determined the features of Leucobacter salsicius M1-8(T), as well as its genome sequence and annotation. The genome comprised 3,185,418 bp with a G+C content of 64.5%, which included 2,865 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the highly transformable Pseudomonas stutzeri strain 28a24.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence for an isolate of Pseudomonas stutzeri that is highly competent for natural transformation. This sequence enables insights into the genetic basis of natural transformation rate variations and provides an additional data point for genomic comparisons across a ubiquitous and highly diverse bacterial species. Copyright © 2014 Smith et al.

Read More »

1 2 3 4 5 6

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives