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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the Leisingera aquimarina type strain (DSM 24565(T)), a member of the marine Roseobacter clade rich in extrachromosomal elements.

Leisingera aquimarina Vandecandelaere et al. 2008 is a member of the genomically well characterized Roseobacter clade within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine Roseobacter clade are metabolically versatile and involved in carbon fixation and biogeochemical processes. They form a physiologically heterogeneous group, found predominantly in coastal or polar waters, especially in symbiosis with algae, in microbial mats, in sediments or associated with invertebrates. Here we describe the features of L. aquimarina DSM 24565(T) together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation. The 5,344,253 bp long genome consists of one chromosome and an unusually high number of seven extrachromosomal elements…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome of Spiribacter salinus M19-40, an abundant gammaproteobacterium in aquatic hypersaline environments.

We have previously used a de novo metagenomic assembly approach to describe the presence of an abundant gammaproteobacterium comprising nearly 15% of the microbial community in an intermediate salinity solar saltern pond. We have obtained this microbe in pure culture and describe the genome sequencing of the halophilic photoheterotrophic microbe, Spiribacter salinus M19-40.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Phaeobacter caeruleus type strain (DSM 24564(T)), a surface-associated member of the marine Roseobacter clade.

In 2009 Phaeobacter caeruleus was described as a novel species affiliated with the marine Roseobacter clade, which, in turn, belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria. The genus Phaeobacter is well known for members that produce various secondary metabolites. Here we report of putative quorum sensing systems, based on the finding of six N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthetases, and show that the blue color of P. caeruleus is probably due to the production of the secondary metabolite indigoidine. Therefore, P. caeruleus might have inhibitory effects on other bacteria. In this study the genome of the type strain DSM 24564(T) was sequenced, annotated and characterized.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pandoraviruses: amoeba viruses with genomes up to 2.5 Mb reaching that of parasitic eukaryotes.

Ten years ago, the discovery of Mimivirus, a virus infecting Acanthamoeba, initiated a reappraisal of the upper limits of the viral world, both in terms of particle size (>0.7 micrometers) and genome complexity (>1000 genes), dimensions typical of parasitic bacteria. The diversity of these giant viruses (the Megaviridae) was assessed by sampling a variety of aquatic environments and their associated sediments worldwide. We report the isolation of two giant viruses, one off the coast of central Chile, the other from a freshwater pond near Melbourne (Australia), without morphological or genomic resemblance to any previously defined virus families. Their micrometer-sized ovoid…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A reveals the unique evolutionary history of a remarkable plant biomass degrader.

Anaerobic gut fungi represent a distinct early-branching fungal phylum (Neocallimastigomycota) and reside in the rumen, hindgut, and feces of ruminant and nonruminant herbivores. The genome of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, was sequenced using a combination of Illumina and PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technologies. The large genome (100.95 Mb, 16,347 genes) displayed extremely low G+C content (17.0%), large noncoding intergenic regions (73.1%), proliferation of microsatellite repeats (4.9%), and multiple gene duplications. Comparative genomic analysis identified multiple genes and pathways that are absent in Dikarya genomes but present in early-branching fungal lineages and/or nonfungal Opisthokonta. These included genes…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain 29R7-12, a piezophilic bacterium isolated from coal-bearing sediment 2.4 kilometers below the seafloor.

Here, we report the genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain 29R7-12, a piezophilic bacterium isolated from coal-bearing sediment down to ~2.4 km below the ocean floor in the northwestern Pacific. The strain is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium, closely related to Bacillus subtilis within the phylum Firmicutes This is the first complete genome sequence of a Bacillus subtilis strain from the deep biosphere. The genome sequence will provide a valuable resource for comparative studies of microorganisms from the surface and subsurface environments. Copyright © 2017 Wei et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the fungal strain 14919 producing 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl–coenzyme A reductase inhibitor FR901512.

Fungal strain 14919 was originally isolated from a soil sample collected at Mt. Kiyosumi, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. It produces FR901512, a potent and strong 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor. The genome sequence of fungal strain 14919 was determined and annotated to improve the productivity of FR901512. Copyright © 2017 Itoh et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Amycolatopsis orientalis CPCC200066, the producer of norvancomycin.

Amycolatopsis orientalis CPCC200066 is an actinomycete exploited commercially in China for the production of norvancomycin, an important glycopeptide antibiotic structurally close to the well-known vancomycin. The availability of the complete genome sequence of CPCC200066 would greatly strengthen our understanding of the regulation pattern of norvancomycin biosynthesis and ultimately improve its production, as well as potentiate discoveries of novel bioactive compounds. Here we report the complete genome sequence of A. orientalis CPCC200066, a circular chromosome consisting of 9,490,992bp. Forty putative secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters, including norvancomycin, were predicted, covering 20.3% of the whole genome. To facilitate genetic manipulation of this…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Antibiotic resistance markers in Burkholderia pseudomallei strain Bp1651 identified by genome sequence analysis.

Burkholderia pseudomallei Bp1651 is resistant to several classes of antibiotics that are usually effective for treatment of melioidosis, including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and ß-lactams such as penicillins (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid), cephalosporins (ceftazidime), and carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem). We sequenced, assembled, and annotated the Bp1651 genome and analyzed the sequence using comparative genomic analyses with susceptible strains, keyword searches of the annotation, publicly available antimicrobial resistance prediction tools, and published reports. More than 100 genes in the Bp1651 sequence were identified as potentially contributing to antimicrobial resistance. Most notably, we identified three previously uncharacterized point mutations in penA, which codes for a class…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis J-5, a potential biocontrol agent.

Bacillus subtilis J-5 was isolated from tomato rhizosphere soil and exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea To shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the biological control on phytopathogens, the whole genome of this strain was sequenced. Genes encoding antimicrobial compounds and the regulatory systems were identified in the genome. Copyright © 2017 Jia et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome mining and predictive functional profiling of acidophilic rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pt14.

Pseudomonas fluorescens Pt14 is a non-pathogenic and acidophilic bacterium isolated from acidic soil (pH 4.65). Genome sequencing of strain Pt14 was performed using Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing to get insights into unique existence of this strain in acidic environment. Complete genome sequence of this strain revealed a chromosome of 5,841,722 bp having 5354 CDSs and 88 RNAs. Phylogenomic reconstruction based on 16S rRNA gene, Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) values and marker proteins revealed that strain Pt14 shared a common clade with P. fluorescens strain A506 and strain SS101. ANI value of strain Pt14 in relation to strain A506 was…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Population genomics of picophytoplankton unveils novel chromosome hypervariability.

Tiny photosynthetic microorganisms that form the picoplankton (between 0.3 and 3 µm in diameter) are at the base of the food web in many marine ecosystems, and their adaptability to environmental change hinges on standing genetic variation. Although the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the bacterial component of the oceans has been intensively studied, little is known about the genomic and phenotypic diversity within each of the diverse eukaryotic species present. We report the level of genomic diversity in a natural population of Ostreococcus tauri (Chlorophyta, Mamiellophyceae), the smallest photosynthetic eukaryote. Contrary to the expectations of clonal evolution or cryptic…

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