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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain CI5.

Escherichia coli represents the primary etiological agent responsible for urinary tract infections, one of the most common infections in humans. We report here the complete genome sequence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain CI5, a clinical pyelonephritis isolate used for studying pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Mehershahi et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Novel recA-independent horizontal gene transfer in Escherichia coli K-12.

In bacteria, mechanisms that incorporate DNA into a genome without strand-transfer proteins such as RecA play a major role in generating novelty by horizontal gene transfer. We describe a new illegitimate recombination event in Escherichia coli K-12: RecA-independent homologous replacements, with very large (megabase-length) donor patches replacing recipient DNA. A previously uncharacterized gene (yjiP) increases the frequency of RecA-independent replacement recombination. To show this, we used conjugal DNA transfer, combining a classical conjugation donor, HfrH, with modern genome engineering methods and whole genome sequencing analysis to enable interrogation of genetic dependence of integration mechanisms and characterization of recombination products. As…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli O96:H19 associated with a severe foodborne outbreak.

We present here the complete genome sequence of a strain of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli O96:H19 from a severe foodborne outbreak in a canteen in Italy in 2014. The complete genome may provide important information about the acquired pathogenicity of this strain and the transition between commensal and pathogenic E. coli. Copyright © 2015 Pettengill et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics and characterization of hybrid Shigatoxigenic and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) strains.

Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor.The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of four Escherichia coli ST95 isolates from bloodstream infections.

Finished genome sequences are presented for four Escherichia coli strains isolated from bloodstream infections at San Francisco General Hospital. These strains provide reference sequences for four major fimH-identified sublineages within the multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST95 group, and provide insights into pathogenicity and differential antimicrobial susceptibility within this group. Copyright © 2015 Stephens et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Molecular characterization using next generation sequencing of plasmids containing blaNDM-7 in Enterobacteriaceae from Calgary, Canada.

Enterobacteriaceae with blaNDM-7 is relatively uncommon and had previously been described in Europe, India, USA and Japan. This study describes the characteristics of Enterobacteriaceae [Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=2), Escherichia coli (n=2), Serratia marcescens (n=1), Enterobacter hormaechei (n=1)] with blaNDM-7 obtained in 4 patients from Calgary, Canada during 2013-4. The 46,161 bp IncX3 plasmids with blaNDM-7 are highly similar to other blaNDM-harboring IncX3 plasmids and interestingly, showed identical structures within the different isolates. This finding may indicate horizontal transmission within our health region or may indicate contact with individuals from endemic areas within the hospital setting. Patients infected or colonized with bacteria…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Synergistic effect of ATP for RuvA-RuvB-Holliday junction DNA complex formation.

The Escherichia coli RuvB hexameric ring motor proteins, together with RuvAs, promote branch migration of Holliday junction DNA. Zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) constitute of nanosized holes and enable the visualization of a single fluorescent molecule under micromolar order of the molecules, which is applicable to characterize the formation of RuvA-RuvB-Holliday junction DNA complex. In this study, we used ZMWs and counted the number of RuvBs binding to RuvA-Holliday junction DNA complex. Our data demonstrated that different nucleotide analogs increased the amount of Cy5-RuvBs binding to RuvA-Holliday junction DNA complex in the following order: no nucleotide, ADP, ATP?S, and mixture of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft whole-genome sequences of nine non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains.

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important food-borne pathogen. Here, we report the draft whole-genome sequences of nine STEC strains isolated from clinical cases in the United States. This is the first report of such information for STEC of serotypes O69, H11, O145:H25, O118:H16, O91:H21, O146:H21, O45:H2, O128:H2, and O121:H19. Copyright © 2014 Lindsey et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of nitrofurantoin-sensitive and -resistant Escherichia coli ST540 and ST2747 strains.

Widespread multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli has necessitated the reintroduction of older antibiotics, such as nitrofurantoin. However, mechanisms by which resistance to nitrofurantoin emerges in E. coli are not well elucidated. Toward this aim, we sequenced two nitrofurantoin-sensitive E. coli sequence types (ST540 and ST2747) and their four nitrofurantoin-resistant derivatives generated in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of 228 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates and 12 isolates representing other diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a common cause for food-borne diarrheal illness outbreaks and sporadic cases. Here, we report the availability of the draft genome sequences of 228 STEC strains representing 32 serotypes with known pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types and epidemiological relationships, as well as 12 strains representing other diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes. Copyright © 2014 Trees et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The dynamics of SecM-induced translational stalling.

SecM is an E. coli secretion monitor capable of stalling translation on the prokaryotic ribosome without cofactors. Biochemical and structural studies have demonstrated that the SecM nascent chain interacts with the 50S subunit exit tunnel to inhibit peptide bond formation. However, the timescales and pathways of stalling on an mRNA remain undefined. To provide a dynamic mechanism for stalling, we directly tracked the dynamics of elongation on ribosomes translating the SecM stall sequence (FSTPVWISQAQGIRAGP) using single-molecule fluorescence techniques. Within 1 min, three peptide-ribosome interactions work cooperatively over the last five codons of the SecM sequence, leading to severely impaired elongation rates beginning from…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A gapless, unambiguous genome sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933.

Escherichia coli EDL933 is the prototypic strain for enterohemorrhagic E. coli serotype O157:H7, associated with deadly food-borne outbreaks. Because the publicly available sequence of the EDL933 genome has gaps and >6,000 ambiguous base calls, we here present an updated high-quality, unambiguous genome sequence with no assembly gaps. Copyright © 2014 Latif et al.

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