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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The draft genome of Primula veris yields insights into the molecular basis of heterostyly.

The flowering plant Primula veris is a common spring blooming perennial that is widely cultivated throughout Europe. This species is an established model system in the study of the genetics, evolution, and ecology of heterostylous floral polymorphisms. Despite the long history of research focused on this and related species, the continued development of this system has been restricted due the absence of genomic and transcriptomic resources.We present here a de novo draft genome assembly of P. veris covering 301.8 Mb, or approximately 63% of the estimated 479.22 Mb genome, with an N50 contig size of 9.5 Kb, an N50 scaffold size of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A draft genome of field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) provides tools for the domestication of a new winter biofuel crop.

Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) is being domesticated as a new winter cover crop and biofuel species for the Midwestern United States that can be double-cropped between corn and soybeans. A genome sequence will enable the use of new technologies to make improvements in pennycress. To generate a draft genome, a hybrid sequencing approach was used to generate 47 Gb of DNA sequencing reads from both the Illumina and PacBio platforms. These reads were used to assemble 6,768 genomic scaffolds. The draft genome was annotated using the MAKER pipeline, which identified 27,390 predicted protein-coding genes, with almost all of these…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii.

Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of five new strains of methylophilaceae isolated from lake washington sediment.

We sequenced the genomes of five new Methylophilaceae strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment. We used the new sequences to sort these new strains into specific Methylophilaceae ecotypes, including one novel ecotype. The new genomes expand the known diversity of Methylophilaceae and provide new models for studying the ecology of methylotrophy. Copyright © 2015 McTaggart et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A17, the first sequenced strain of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris with potential immunomodulatory functions.

Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris A17, isolated from Taiwan fermented cabbage, is the first sequenced strain of L. lactis subsp. cremoris with immunomodulatory activity and antiallergic functions. The resulting A17 draft genome contains 2,679,936 bp and indicates that A17 is a potential exopolysaccharide-producing strain without any known virulence gene. Copyright © 2015 Yang et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 isolated from Lake Washington sediment.

Sequencing the genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 from Lake Washington sediment is announced. From the genome content, a versatile life-style is predicted, but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. Copyright © 2015 McTaggart et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis in Lactobacillus reuteri.

Reutericyclin is a unique antimicrobial tetramic acid produced by some strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. This study aimed to identify the genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis. Comparisons of the genomes of reutericyclin-producing L. reuteri strains with those of non-reutericyclin-producing strains identified a genomic island of 14 open reading frames (ORFs) including genes coding for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), homologues of PhlA, PhlB, and PhlC, and putative transport and regulatory proteins. The protein encoded by rtcN is composed of a condensation domain, an adenylation domain likely specific for d-leucine, and a thiolation domain. rtcK codes for a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of a draft genome sequence of Kitasatospora cheerisanensis KCTC 2395 producing bafilomycin antibiotics.

Kitasatospora cheerisanensis KCTC 2395, producing bafilomycin antibiotics belonging to plecomacrolide group, was isolated from a soil sample at Mt. Jiri, Korea. The draft genome sequence contains 8.04 Mb with 73.6% G+C content and 7,810 open reading frames. All the genes for aerial mycelium and spore formations were confirmed in this draft genome. In phylogenetic analysis of MurE proteins (UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamate:DAP ligase) in a conserved dcw (division of cell wall) locus, MurE proteins of Kitasatospora species were placed in a separate clade between MurEs of Streptomyces species incorporating LL-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) and MurEs of Saccharopolyspora erythraea as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligating…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Do echinoderm genomes measure up?

Echinoderm genome sequences are a corpus of useful information about a clade of animals that serve as research models in fields ranging from marine ecology to cell and developmental biology. Genomic information from echinoids has contributed to insights into the gene interactions that drive the developmental process at the molecular level. Such insights often rely heavily on genomic information and the kinds of questions that can be asked thus depend on the quality of the sequence information. Here we describe the history of echinoderm genomic sequence assembly and present details about the quality of the data obtained. All of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain 11/12A, isolated from Lake Washington sediment.

We announce here the genome sequencing of Pseudomonas sp. strain 11/12A from Lake Washington sediment. From the genome content, a versatile lifestyle is predicted but not one of bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Pseudomonas sp. 11/12A presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. Copyright © 2015 McTaggart et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genomes of two strains of flavobacterium isolated from Lake Washington sediment.

We report sequencing the genomes of two new Flavobacterium strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment. From genomic contents, versatile lifestyles were predicted but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of their genomic sequences, the new Flavobacterium strains present prospective models for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. Copyright © 2015 McTaggart et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs isolated from lake washington sediment.

The genomes of Methylosarcina lacus LW14(T) (=ATCC BAA-1047(T) = JCM 13284(T)), Methylobacter sp. strain 21/22, Methylobacter sp. strain 31/32, Methylomonas sp. strain LW13, Methylomonas sp. strain MK1, and Methylomonas sp. strain 11b were sequenced and are reported here. All the strains are obligately methanotrophic bacteria isolated from the sediment of Lake Washington. Copyright © 2015 Kalyuzhnaya et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea HI1, determined using Roche 454 and PacBio single-molecule real-time hybrid sequencing.

We report here the 6.0-Mb draft genome assembly of Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea strain HI1 using Roche 454 and PacBio single-molecule real-time hybrid-sequencing analysis. This strain is of biological importance since it has the capacity to induce the settlement and metamorphosis of the serpulid polychaete Hydroides elegans and the coral Pocillopora damicornis. Copyright © 2015 Asahina and Hadfield.

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