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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Strategies for high-altitude adaptation revealed from high-quality draft genome of non-violacein producing Janthinobacterium lividum ERGS5:01.

A light pink coloured bacterial strain ERGS5:01 isolated from glacial stream water of Sikkim Himalaya was affiliated to Janthinobacterium lividum based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and phylogenetic clustering. Whole genome sequencing was performed for the strain to confirm its taxonomy as it lacked the typical violet pigmentation of the genus and also to decipher its survival strategy at the aquatic ecosystem of high elevation. The PacBio RSII sequencing generated genome of 5,168,928 bp with 4575 protein-coding genes and 118 RNA genes. Whole genome-based multilocus sequence analysis clustering, in silico DDH similarity value of 95.1% and, the ANI value of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis Lzh-a42, a plant growth- promoting rhizobacterium isolated from tomato rhizosphere.

The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus velezensis strain Lzh-a42, which has antimicrobial activity, was isolated from tomato rhizosphere. Here, we report its genome sequence, which includes several predicted functional genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis, antimicrobial activity, and biofilm synthesis. Copyright © 2018 Li et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence and annotation of the phytopathogenic Ralstonia pickettii (previously Burkholderia glumae) strain ICMP-8657.

Strain ICMP-8657 was formerly taxonomically classified as Burkholderia glumae and reported to be the producer of an antibacterial pyrazole derivative. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ICMP-8657, which failed to demonstrate the biosynthetic capacity to produce the stated antibacterial compound, leading to its taxonomic reclassification as Ralstonia pickettii ICMP-8657. Copyright © 2018 Paterson and Gross.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae strain EpK1/15 isolated from an apple twig showing black shoot blight

Erwinia pyrifoliae is a Gram-negative bacterium causing black shoot blight in apple and Asian pear trees. E. pyrifoliae strain EpK1/15 was isolated in 2014 from an apple twig from the Pocheon, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of E. pyrifoliae EpK1/15 using PacBio RS II platform. The draft genome is comprised of a circular chromosome with 4,027,225 bp and 53.4% G + C content and a plasmid with 48,456 bp and 50.3% G + C content. The draft genome includes 3,798 protein-coding genes, 22 rRNA genes, 77 tRNA genes, 13 non-coding RNA genes, and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Improved draft genome sequence of a monoteliosporic culture of the karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) pathogen of wheat.

Karnal bunt of wheat is an internationally quarantined fungal pathogen disease caused by Tilletia indica and affects the international commercial seed trade of wheat. We announce here the first improved draft genome assembly of a monoteliosporic culture of the Tilletia indica fungus, consisting of 787 scaffolds with an approximate total genome size of 31.83 Mbp, which is more accurate and near to complete than the previous version. Copyright © 2018 Kumar et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Tuber borchii Vittad., a whitish edible truffle.

The ascomycete Tuber borchii (Pezizomycetes) is a whitish edible truffle that establishes ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with trees and shrubs. This fungus is ubiquitous in Europe and is also cultivated outside Europe. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of T. borchii strain Tbo3840 (97.18 Mb in 969 scaffolds, with 12,346 predicted protein-coding genes).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Deinococcus koreensis SJW1-2T, a gamma radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from river water.

Deinococcus koreensis SJW1-2Twas isolated from river water and was observed to be highly resistant to gamma radiation. In this study, we report a draft genome sequence which revealed that SJW1-2Tpossesses genes involved in nucleo- tide excision repair. The primary genomic information will aid in elucidating the DNA repair mechanism during ionizing radiation.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Draft Genome of the MD-2 Pineapple

The main challenge in assembling plant genome is its ploidy level, repeats content, and polymorphism. The second-generation sequencing delivered the throughput and the accuracy that is crucial to whole-genome sequencing but insufficient and remained challenging for some plant species. It is known that genomes produced by next-gen- eration sequencing produced small contigs that would inflate the number of annotated genes (Varshney et al. 2011) and missed on the transposable elements that are abun- dant in plant genome due to their repetitive nature (Michael and Jackson 2013).

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