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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Transcriptional adaptations during long-term persistence of Staphylococcus aureus in the airways of a cystic fibrosis patient.

The lungs of Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are often colonized and/or infected by Staphylococcus aureus for years, mostly by one predominant clone. For long-term survival in this environment, S. aureus needs to adapt during its interactions with host factors, antibiotics, and other pathogens. Here, we study long-term transcriptional as well as genomic adaptations of an isogenic pair of S. aureus isolates from a single patient using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). Mimicking in vivo conditions, we cultivated the S. aureus isolates using artificial sputum medium before harvesting RNA for subsequent analysis. We confirmed our RNA-Seq data using…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Different next generation sequencing platforms produce different microbial profiles and diversity in cystic fibrosis sputum.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent lung infections. Studies of the lung microbiome have shown an association between decreasing diversity and progressive disease. 454 pyrosequencing has frequently been used to study the lung microbiome in CF, but will no longer be supported. We sought to identify the benefits and drawbacks of using two state-of-the-art next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms, MiSeq and PacBio RSII, to characterize the CF lung microbiome. Each has its advantages and limitations.Twelve samples of extracted bacterial DNA were sequenced on both MiSeq and PacBio NGS platforms. DNA was amplified for the V4…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Genome reference and sequence variation in the large repetitive central exon of human MUC5AC.

Despite modern sequencing efforts, the difficulty in assembly of highly repetitive sequences has prevented resolution of human genome gaps, including some in the coding regions of genes with important biological functions. One such gene, MUC5AC, encodes a large, secreted mucin, which is one of the two major secreted mucins in human airways. The MUC5AC region contains a gap in the human genome reference (hg19) across the large, highly repetitive, and complex central exon. This exon is predicted to contain imperfect tandem repeat sequences and multiple conserved cysteine-rich (CysD) domains. To resolve the MUC5AC genomic gap, we used high-fidelity long PCR…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain FRD1, isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient.

We announce here the complete genome sequence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain FRD1, isolated from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. The complete genome of P. aeruginosa FRD1 is 6,712,339 bp. This genome will allow comparative genomics to be used to identify genes associated with virulence, especially those involved in chronic pulmonary infections. Copyright © 2015 Silo-Suh et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6.

Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6 is a betaproteobacterium that was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient. Here we report the 6.4 Mb draft genome sequence assembled into 2 contigs. This genome sequence will aid the transcriptomic profiling of this bacterium and help us to better understand the mechanisms specific to pulmonary infections. Copyright © 2015 Belcaid et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of Burkholderia contaminans, a Burkholderia cepacia complex species that is increasingly recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

Burkholderia contaminans belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a group of bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and capable of infecting the immunocompromised and people with cystic fibrosis. We report here draft genome sequences for the B. contaminans type strain LMG 23361 and an Argentinian cystic fibrosis sputum isolate. Copyright © 2015 Bloodworth et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of highly adherent Pseudomonas aeruginosa small-colony variant SCV20265.

The evolution of small-colony variants within Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations chronically infecting the cystic fibrosis lung is one example of the emergence of adapted subpopulations. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the autoaggregative and hyperpiliated P. aeruginosa small-colony variant SCV20265, which was isolated from a cystic ?brosis (CF) patient.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome assemblies of 56 Burkholderia species.

Burkholderia is a genus of betaproteobacteria that includes three notable human pathogens: B. cepacia, B. pseudomallei, and B. mallei. While B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are considered potential biowarfare agents, B. cepacia infections are largely limited to cystic fibrosis patients. Here, we present 56 Burkholderia genomes from 8 distinct species. Copyright © 2014 Daligault et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence analysis of Pandoraea pnomenusa type strain DSM 16536(T) isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient.

The genus of Pandoraea was first proposed in 2000 following the isolation from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients (Coenye et al., 2000). Five species were initially assigned to the novel genus namely Pandoraea apista, Pandoraea pulmonicola, Pandoraea pnomenusa, Pandoraea sputorum, and Pandoraea norimbergensis but the description of four new species and another four genomospecies in the subsequent years led to a total of nine species and four genomospecies within the genus of Pandoraea (Daneshvar et al., 2001; Anandham et al., 2010; Sahin et al., 2011). The isolation of Pandoraea spp. from various environmental samples such as water, sludge, and…

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