September 22, 2019  |  

MetaSort untangles metagenome assembly by reducing microbial community complexity.

Most current approaches to analyse metagenomic data rely on reference genomes. Novel microbial communities extend far beyond the coverage of reference databases and de novo metagenome assembly from complex microbial communities remains a great challenge. Here we present a novel experimental and bioinformatic framework, metaSort, for effective construction of bacterial genomes from metagenomic samples. MetaSort provides a sorted mini-metagenome approach based on flow cytometry and single-cell sequencing methodologies, and employs new computational algorithms to efficiently recover high-quality genomes from the sorted mini-metagenome by the complementary of the original metagenome. Through extensive evaluations, we demonstrated that metaSort has an excellent and unbiased performance on genome recovery and assembly. Furthermore, we applied metaSort to an unexplored microflora colonized on the surface of marine kelp and successfully recovered 75 high-quality genomes at one time. This approach will greatly improve access to microbial genomes from complex or novel communities.


September 22, 2019  |  

LSCplus: a fast solution for improving long read accuracy by short read alignment.

The single molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing technology of Pacific Biosciences enables the acquisition of transcripts from end to end due to its ability to produce extraordinarily long reads (>10 kb). This new method of transcriptome sequencing has been applied to several projects on humans and model organisms. However, the raw data from SMRT sequencing are of relatively low quality, with a random error rate of approximately 15 %, for which error correction using next-generation sequencing (NGS) short reads is typically necessary. Few tools have been designed that apply a hybrid sequencing approach that combines NGS and SMRT data, and the most popular existing tool for error correction, LSC, has computing resource requirements that are too intensive for most laboratory and research groups. These shortcomings severely limit the application of SMRT long reads for transcriptome analysis.Here, we report an improved tool (LSCplus) for error correction with the LSC program as a reference. LSCplus overcomes the disadvantage of LSC’s time consumption and improves quality. Only 1/3-1/4 of the time and 1/20-1/25 of the error correction time is required using LSCplus compared with that required for using LSC.LSCplus is freely available at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/lscplus/ . Sample calculations are provided illustrating the precision and efficiency of this method regarding error correction and isoform detection.


July 7, 2019  |  

A pipeline for local assembly of minisatellite alleles from single-molecule sequencing data.

The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has led to the generation of enormous volumes of short read sequence data, cheaply and in reasonable time scales. Nevertheless, the quality of genome assemblies generated using NGS technologies has been greatly affected, compared to those generated using Sanger DNA sequencing. This is largely due to the inability of short read sequence data to scaffold repetitive structures, creating gaps, inversions and rearrangements and resulting in assemblies that are, at best, draft forms. Third generation single-molecule sequencing (SMS) technologies (e.g. Pacific Biosciences Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) system) address this challenge by generating sequences with increased read lengths, offering the prospect to better recover these complex repetitive structures, concomitantly improving assembly quality.Here, we evaluate the ability of SMS data (specifically human genome Pacific Biosciences SMRT data) to recover poorly represented repetitive sequences (specifically, GC-rich human minisatellites). To do this we designed a pipeline for the collection, processing and local assembly of single-molecule sequence data to form accurate contiguous local reconstructions. Our results show the recovery of an allele of the non-coding minisatellite MS1 (located on chromosome 1 at 1p33-35) at greater than 97% identity to reference (GRCh38) from the unprocessed sequence data of a haploid complete hydatidiform mole (CHM1) cell line. Furthermore, our assembly revealed an allele of over 500 repeat units; much larger than the reference (GRCh38), but consistent in structure with naturally occurring alleles that are segregating in human populations. This local assembly’s reconstruction was validated with the release of the whole genome assemblies GCA_001297185.1 and GCA_000772585.3, where this allele occurs. Additionally, application of this pipeline to coding minisatellites in the PRDM9 and ZNF93 genes enabled recovery of high identity allele structures for these sequence regions whose length was confirmed by PCR from cell line genomic DNA. The internal repeat structure of the PRDM9 allele recovered was consistent with common human-specific alleles.Code available at https://github.com/ndliberial/smrt_pipeline CONTACT: dno2@le.ac.uk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.


July 7, 2019  |  

DBG2OLC: Efficient assembly of large genomes using long erroneous reads of the third generation sequencing technologies.

The highly anticipated transition from next generation sequencing (NGS) to third generation sequencing (3GS) has been difficult primarily due to high error rates and excessive sequencing cost. The high error rates make the assembly of long erroneous reads of large genomes challenging because existing software solutions are often overwhelmed by error correction tasks. Here we report a hybrid assembly approach that simultaneously utilizes NGS and 3GS data to address both issues. We gain advantages from three general and basic design principles: (i) Compact representation of the long reads leads to efficient alignments. (ii) Base-level errors can be skipped; structural errors need to be detected and corrected. (iii) Structurally correct 3GS reads are assembled and polished. In our implementation, preassembled NGS contigs are used to derive the compact representation of the long reads, motivating an algorithmic conversion from a de Bruijn graph to an overlap graph, the two major assembly paradigms. Moreover, since NGS and 3GS data can compensate for each other, our hybrid assembly approach reduces both of their sequencing requirements. Experiments show that our software is able to assemble mammalian-sized genomes orders of magnitude more quickly than existing methods without consuming a lot of memory, while saving about half of the sequencing cost.


July 7, 2019  |  

Assemblytics: a web analytics tool for the detection of variants from an assembly.

Assemblytics is a web app for detecting and analyzing variants from a de novo genome assembly aligned to a reference genome. It incorporates a unique anchor filtering approach to increase robustness to repetitive elements, and identifies six classes of variants based on their distinct alignment signatures. Assemblytics can be applied both to comparing aberrant genomes, such as human cancers, to a reference, or to identify differences between related species. Multiple interactive visualizations enable in-depth explorations of the genomic distributions of variants.http://assemblytics.com, https://github.com/marianattestad/assemblytics CONTACT: mnattest@cshl.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.


July 7, 2019  |  

MethSMRT: an integrative database for DNA N6-methyladenine and N4-methylcytosine generated by single-molecular real-time sequencing

DNA methylation is an important type of epigenetic modifications, where 5- methylcytosine (5mC), 6-methyadenine (6mA) and 4-methylcytosine (4mC) are the most common types. Previous efforts have been largely focused on 5mC, providing invaluable insights into epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation. Recently developed single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology provides a unique opportunity to detect the less studied DNA 6mA and 4mC modifications at single-nucleotide resolution. With a rapidly increased amount of SMRT sequencing data generated, there is an emerging demand to systematically explore DNA 6mA and 4mC modifications from these data sets. MethSMRT is the first resource hosting DNA 6mA and 4mC methylomes. All the data sets were processed using the same analysis pipeline with the same quality control. The current version of the database provides a platform to store, browse, search and download epigenome-wide methylation profiles of 156 species, including seven eukaryotes such as Arabidopsis, C. elegans, Drosophila, mouse and yeast, as well as 149 prokaryotes. It also offers a genome browser to visualize the methylation sites and related information such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and genomic annotation. Furthermore, the database provides a quick summary of statistics of methylome of 6mA and 4mC and predicted methylation motifs for each species. MethSMRT is publicly available at http://sysbio.sysu.edu.cn/methsmrt/ without use restriction.


July 7, 2019  |  

WhatsHap: fast and accurate read-based phasing

Read-based phasing allows to reconstruct the haplotype structure of a sample purely from sequencing reads. While phasing is a required step for answering questions about population genetics, compound heterozygosity, and to aid in clinical decision making, there has been a lack of an accurate, usable and standards-based software. WhatsHap is a production-ready tool for highly accurate read-based phasing. It was designed from the beginning to leverage third-generation sequencing technologies, whose long reads can span many variants and are therefore ideal for phasing. WhatsHap works also well with second-generation data, is easy to use and will phase not only SNVs, but also indels and other variants. It is unique in its ability to combine read-based with genetic phasing, allowing to further improve accuracy if multiple related samples are provided.


Talk with an expert

If you have a question, need to check the status of an order, or are interested in purchasing an instrument, we're here to help.