July 7, 2019  |  

Prevalence of mcr-1 in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infections in China: a multicentre longitudinal study.

Polymyxin antibiotics are used as last-resort therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance determinant MCR-1 has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae in China. We did this study to investigate the prevalence of the mcr-1 gene in clinical isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in China.Clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were collected from patients with bloodstream infections at 28 hospitals in China, then screened for colistin resistance by broth microdilution and for the presence of the mcr-1 gene by PCR amplification. We subjected mcr-1-positive isolates to genotyping, susceptibility testing, and clinical data analysis. We established the genetic location of mcr-1 with Southern blot hybridisation, and we analysed plasmids containing mcr-1 with filter mating, electroporation, and DNA sequencing.2066 isolates, consisting of 1495 E coli isolates and 571 K pneumoniae isolates were collected. Of the 1495 E coli isolates, 20 (1%) were mcr-1-positive, whereas we detected only one (<1%) mcr-1-positive isolate among the 571 K pneumoniae isolates. All mcr-1-positive E coli and K pneumoniae isolates were resistant to colistin, with minimum inhibitory concentrations values in the range of 4-32 mg/L, except for one E coli isolate that had a minimum inhibitory concentration less than or equal to 0·06 mg/L. All 21 mcr-1-positive isolates were susceptible to tigecycline and 20 isolates (95%) were susceptible to the carbapenem and ß-lactamase inhibitor combination piperacillin and tazobactam. One mcr-1-positive E coli isolate also produced NDM-5, which confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The 21 mcr-1-positive isolates were clonally diverse and carried mcr-1 on two types of plasmids, a 33 kb IncX4 plasmid and a 61 kb Inc12 plasmid. The 30 day mortality of the patients with bloodstream infections caused by mcr-1-positive isolates was zero.mcr-1-positive isolates from bloodstream infections were rare, sporadic, and remained susceptible to many antimicrobial agents. E coli, rather than K pneumoniae, was the main host of the mcr-1 gene. Further studies are needed to clarify the clinical impact of this novel resistance gene.National Natural Science Foundation of China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


July 7, 2019  |  

Analysis of serial isolates of mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli reveals a highly active ISApl1 transposon.

The emergence of a transferable colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) is of global concern. The insertion sequence ISApl1 is a key component in the mobilization of this gene, but its role remains poorly understood. Six Escherichia coli isolates were cultured from the same patient over the course of 1 month in Germany and the United States after a brief hospitalization in Bahrain for an unconnected illness. Four carried mcr-1 as determined by real-time PCR, but two were negative. Two additional mcr-1-negative E. coli isolates were collected during follow-up surveillance 9 months later. All isolates were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). WGS revealed that the six initial isolates were composed of two distinct strains: an initial ST-617 E. coli strain harboring mcr-1 and a second, unrelated, mcr-1-negative ST-32 E. coli strain that emerged 2 weeks after hospitalization. Follow-up swabs taken 9 months later were negative for the ST-617 strain, but the mcr-1-negative ST-32 strain was still present. mcr-1 was associated with a single copy of ISApl1, located on a 64.5-kb IncI2 plasmid that shared >95% homology with other mcr-1 IncI2 plasmids. ISApl1 copy numbers ranged from 2 for the first isolate to 6 for the final isolate, but ISApl1 movement was independent of mcr-1 Some movement was accompanied by gene disruption, including the loss of genes encoding proteins involved in stress responses, arginine catabolism, and l-arabinose utilization. These data represent the first comprehensive analysis of ISApl1 movement in serial clinical isolates and reveal that, under certain conditions, ISApl1 is a highly active IS element whose movement may be detrimental to the host cell. Copyright © 2017 Snesrud et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Prevalence and molecular characterization of mcr-1-positive Salmonella strains recovered from clinical specimens in China.

The recently discovered colistin resistance element, mcr-1, adds to the list of antimicrobial resistance genes that rapidly erode the antimicrobial efficacy of not only the commonly used antibiotics but also the last-line agents of carbapenems and colistin. This study investigated the prevalence of the mobile colistin resistance determinant mcr-1 in Salmonella strains recovered from clinical settings in China and the transmission potential of mcr-1-bearing mobile elements harbored by such isolates. The mcr-1 gene was recoverable in 1.4% of clinical isolates tested, with the majority of them belonging to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. These isolates exhibited diverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles and high resistance to antibiotics other than colistin and particularly to cephalosporins. Plasmid analysis showed that mcr-1 was carried on a variety of plasmids with sizes ranging from ~30 to ~250 kb, among which there were conjugative plasmids of ~30 kb, ~60 kb, and ~250 kb and nonconjugative plasmids of ~140 kb, ~180 kb, and ~240 kb. Sequencing of representative mcr-1-carrying plasmids revealed that all conjugative plasmids belonged to the IncX4, IncI2, and IncHI2 types and were highly similar to the corresponding types of plasmids reported previously. Nonconjugative plasmids all belonged to the IncHI2 type, and the nontransferability of these plasmids was attributed to the loss of a region carrying partial or complete tra genes. Our data revealed that, similar to the situation in Escherichia coli, mcr-1 transmission in Salmonella was accelerated by various plasmids, suggesting that transmission of mcr-1-carrying plasmids between different species of Enterobacteriaceae may be a common event. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome of a panresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, isolated from a patient with respiratory failure in a Canadian community hospital.

We report here the complete genome sequence of a panresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, isolated from a patient with respiratory failure in Canada. No carbapenemase genes were identified. Carbapenem resistance is attributable to a frameshift in the oprD gene; the basis for colistin resistance remains undetermined. Copyright © 2017 Xiong et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Prevalence of colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) containing Enterobacteriaceae in feces of patients attending a tertiary care hospital and detection of a mcr-1 containing, colistin susceptible E. coli.

The emergence of the plasmid-mediated mcr colistin resistance gene in the community poses a potential threat for treatment of patients, especially when hospitalized. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of all currently known mcr mediated colistin resistance gene in fecal samples of patients attending a tertiary care hospital. From November 2014 until July 2015, fecal samples of patients attending the Leiden University Medical Center were collected and screened for presence of mcr using real-time PCR. Two of 576 patients were positive for mcr-1, resulting in a prevalence of 0.35%, whereas no mcr-2 was found. One of these samples was culture negative, the second sample contained a blaCMY-2 and mcr-1 containing E.coli. This strain belonged to Sequence Type 359 and serotype O177:H21. The mcr-1 containing E.coli was phenotypically susceptible to colistin with a MIC of = 0.25mg/l, due to a 1329bp transposon IS10R inserted into the mcr-1 gene as identified by WGS. This prevalence study shows that mcr-1 is present in low levels patients out of the community attending a hospital. Furthermore the study underlines the importance of phenotypical confirmation of molecular detection of a mcr-1 gene.


July 7, 2019  |  

Novel plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-3 in Escherichia coli.

The mobile colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has attracted global attention, as it heralds the breach of polymyxins, one of the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of severe clinical infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. To date, six slightly different variants of mcr-1, and a second mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-2, have been reported or annotated in the GenBank database. Here, we characterized a third mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3 The gene coexisted with 18 additional resistance determinants in the 261-kb IncHI2-type plasmid pWJ1 from porcine Escherichia colimcr-3 showed 45.0% and 47.0% nucleotide sequence identity to mcr-1 and mcr-2, respectively, while the deduced amino acid sequence of MCR-3 showed 99.8 to 100% and 75.6 to 94.8% identity to phosphoethanolamine transferases found in other Enterobacteriaceae species and in 10 Aeromonas species, respectively. pWJ1 was mobilized to an E. coli recipient by conjugation and contained a plasmid backbone similar to those of other mcr-1-carrying plasmids, such as pHNSHP45-2 from the original mcr-1-harboring E. coli strain. Moreover, a truncated transposon element, TnAs2, which was characterized only in Aeromonas salmonicida, was located upstream of mcr-3 in pWJ1. This ?TnAs2-mcr-3 element was also identified in a shotgun genome sequence of a porcine E. coli isolate from Malaysia, a human Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Thailand, and a human Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate from the United States. These results suggest the likelihood of a wide dissemination of the novel mobile colistin resistance gene mcr-3 among Enterobacteriaceae and aeromonads; the latter may act as a potential reservoir for mcr-3IMPORTANCE The emergence of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has attracted substantial attention worldwide. Here, we examined a colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolate that was negative for both mcr-1 and mcr-2 and discovered a novel mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3 The amino acid sequence of MCR-3 aligned closely with phosphoethanolamine transferases from Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonas species originating from both clinical infections and environmental samples collected in 12 countries on four continents. Due to the ubiquitous profile of aeromonads in the environment and the potential transfer of mcr-3 between Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonas species, the wide spread of mcr-3 may be largely underestimated. As colistin has been and still is widely used in veterinary medicine and used at increasing frequencies in human medicine, the continuous monitoring of mobile colistin resistance determinants in colistin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is imperative for understanding and tackling the dissemination of mcr genes in both the agricultural and health care sectors. Copyright © 2017 Yin et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Expanding landscapes of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmid reservoirs.

Polymyxin is a cationic polypeptide antibiotic that can disrupt bacterial cell membrane by interacting with its lipopolysaccharide molecules and is used as a last resort drug against lethal infections by the carbapenem-resistant superbugs (like NDM-1). However, global discovery of the MCR-1 colistin resistance dramatically challenges the newly renewed interest in colistin for clinical use.The mcr-1-harboring plasmids were acquired from swine and human Escherichia coli isolated in China, from 2015 to 2016, and subjected to Illumina PacBio RSII and Hi-Seq2000 for full genome sequencing. PCR was applied to close the gap of the assembled contigs. Ori-Finder was employed to predict the replication origin (oriC) in plasmids. The phenotype of MCR-1-producing isolates was evaluated on the LBA plates with various level of colistin. Genetic deletion was used to test the requirement of the initial “ATG” codon for the MCR-1 function.Here, we report full genomes of over 10 mcr-1-harboring plasmids with diversified replication incompatibilities. A novel hybrid IncI2/IncFIB plasmid pGD17-2 was discovered and characterized from a swine isolate with colistin resistance. Intriguingly, co-occurrence of two unique mcr-1-bearing plasmids (pGD65-3, IncI2, and pGD65-5, IncX4) was detected in a single isolate GD65, which might accelerate dissemination of the mcr-1 under environmental selection pressure. Genetic analyses of these plasmids mapped mobile elements in the context of antibiotic resistance and determined two insertion sequences (ISEcp1 and ISApl1) that are responsible for the mobilization of mcr-1. Gene deletion also proved that the first ATG codon is redundant in the mcr-1 gene.Collectively, our results extend landscapes of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmid reservoirs.


July 7, 2019  |  

Structural modification of LPS in colistin-resistant, KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Colistin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae typically involves inactivation or mutations of chromosomal genes mgrB, pmrAB or phoPQ, but data regarding consequent modifications of LPS are limited.To examine the sequences of chromosomal loci implicated in colistin resistance and the respective LPS-derived lipid A profiles using 11 pairs of colistin-susceptible and -resistant KPC-producing K. pneumoniae clinical strains.The strains were subjected to high-throughput sequencing with Illumina HiSeq. The mgrB gene was amplified by PCR and sequenced. Lipid profiles were determined using MALDI-TOF MS.All patients were treated with colistimethate prior to the isolation of colistin-resistant strains (MIC >2?mg/L). Seven of 11 colistin-resistant strains had deletion or insertional inactivation of mgrB. Three strains, including one with an mgrB deletion, had non-synonymous pmrB mutations associated with colistin resistance. When analysed by MALDI-TOF MS, all colistin-resistant strains generated mass spectra containing ions at m/z 1955 and 1971, consistent with addition of 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (Ara4N) to lipid A, whereas only one of the susceptible strains displayed this lipid A phenotype.The pathway to colistin resistance in K. pneumoniae primarily involves lipid A modification with Ara4N in clinical settings.© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


July 7, 2019  |  

Genetic characterization of mcr-1-bearing plasmids to depict molecular mechanisms underlying dissemination of the colistin resistance determinant.

To analyse and compare mcr-1-bearing plasmids from animal Escherichia coli isolates, and to investigate potential mechanisms underlying dissemination of mcr-1.Ninety-seven ESBL-producing E. coli strains isolated from pig farms in China were screened for the mcr-1 gene. Fifteen mcr-1-positive strains were subjected to molecular characterization and bioinformatic analysis of the mcr-1-bearing plasmids that they harboured.Three major types of mcr-1-bearing plasmids were recovered: IncX4 (~33 kb), IncI2 (~60 kb) and IncHI2 (~216-280 kb), among which the IncX4 and IncI2 plasmids were found to harbour the mcr-1 gene only, whereas multiple resistance elements including blaCTX-M, blaCMY, blaTEM, fosA, qnrS, floR and oqxAB were detected, in various combinations, alongside mcr-1 in the IncHI2 plasmids. The profiles of mcr-1-bearing plasmids in the test strains were highly variable, with coexistence of two mcr-1-bearing plasmids being common. However, the MIC of colistin was not affected by the number of mcr-1-carrying plasmids harboured. Comparative analysis of the plasmids showed that they contained an mcr-1 gene cassette with varied structures (mcr-1-orf, ISApl1-mcr-1-orf and Tn6330), with the IncHI2 type being the most active in acquiring foreign resistance genes. A novel transposon, Tn6330, with the structure ISApl1-mcr-1-orf-ISApl1 was found to be the key element mediating translocation of mcr-1 into various plasmid backbones through formation of a circular intermediate.The mcr-1 gene can be disseminated via multiple mobile elements including Tn6330, its circular intermediate and plasmids harbouring such elements. It is often co-transmitted with other resistance determinants through IncHI2 plasmids. The functional mechanism of Tn6330, a typical composite transposon harbouring mcr-1, should be further investigated.© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.


July 7, 2019  |  

Detection and genetic features of MCR-1-producing plasmid in human Escherichia coli infection in South Korea.

The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was identified for the first time from a hospitalized patient in South Korea. The mcr-1 gene was successfully transferred to E. coli J53 recipient and conferred resistance to colistin in the recipient. The mcr-1-harboring plasmid possessed a typical IncI2 group and did not have the mcr-1-associated ISApl1 element. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B sequence type 28 harboring mcr-1.

In 2015, plasmid-mediated colistin resistance was reported to be caused by a mobilized phosphoethanolamine transferase gene (mcr-1) in Enterobacteriaceae Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the earliest d-tartrate-fermenting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B isolate harboring mcr-1 from the collection of the German National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella. Copyright © 2017 Borowiak et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

MCR-1 and OXA-48 in vivo acquisition in KPC-producing Escherichia coli after colistin treatment.

The spread of mcr-1-encoding plasmids into carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae raises concerns about the emergence of untreatable bacteria. We report the acquisition of mcr-1 in a carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strain after a 3-week course of colistin in a patient repatriated to France from Portugal. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing E. coli strain acquired two plasmids, an IncL OXA-48-encoding plasmid and an IncX4 mcr-1-encoding plasmid. This is the first report of mcr-1 in carbapenemase-encoding bacteria in France. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.


July 7, 2019  |  

Remarkable diversity of Escherichia coli carrying mcr-1 from hospital sewage with the identification of two new mcr-1 variants.

The plasmid-borne colistin-resistant gene mcr-1 has rapidly become a worldwide public health concern. This study aims to determine the host bacterial strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts of mcr-1 in hospital sewage. A 1-ml hospital sewage sample was cultured. Colistin-resistant bacterial colonies were selected on agar plates and were subjected to whole genome sequencing and subsequent analysis. The transfer of mcr-1 between bacterial strains was tested using conjugation. New variants of mcr-1 were cloned to test the impact of variations on the function of mcr-1. Plasmids carrying mcr-1 were retrieved from GenBank for comparison based on concatenated backbone genes. In the sewage sample, we observed that mcr-1 was located in various genetic contexts on the chromosome, or plasmids of four different replicon types (IncHI2, IncI2, IncP, and IncX4), in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera spp. and seven Escherichia coli strains of six different sequence types (ST10, ST34, ST48, ST1196, ST7086, and ST7087). We also identified two new variants of mcr-1, mcr-1.4 and mcr-1.7, both of which encode an amino acid variation from mcr-1. mcr-1-carrying IncX4 plasmids, which have a global distribution across the Enterobacteriaceae, are the result of global dissemination of a single common plasmid, while IncI2 mcr-1 plasmids appear to acquire mcr-1 in multiple events. In conclusion, the unprecedented remarkable diversity of species, strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts carrying mcr-1 present in a single sewage sample from a single healthcare site highlights the continued evolution and dynamic transmission of mcr-1 in healthcare-associated environments.


July 7, 2019  |  

Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae.

Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics.


July 7, 2019  |  

Escherichia coli harboring mcr-1 and blaCTX-M on a novel IncF plasmid: first report of mcr-1 in the United States.

The recent discovery of a plasmid-borne colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, in China heralds the emergence of truly pan-drug-resistant bacteria (1). The gene has been found primarily in Escherichia coli but has also been identified in other members of the Enterobacteriaceae in human, animal, food, and environmental samples on every continent (2–5). In response to this threat, starting in May 2016, all extended-spectrum-ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli clinical isolates submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC) have been tested for resistance to colistin by Etest. Here we report the presence of mcr-1 in an E. coli strain cultured from a patient with a urinary tract infection (UTI) in the United States. The strain was resistant to colistin, but it remained susceptible to several other agents, including amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, all carbapenems, and nitrofurantoin (Table 1).


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