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Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Long-read Sequencing and Optical Mapping of ATXN10 Repeat Expansion

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by an expanded intronic pentanucleotide repeat in the ATXN10 gene. This repeat expansion when fully penetrant can be typically expected between 850 and 4500 repeats or 4.25 to 22.5 kb. Current diagnostic assays using PCR-based methods or Southern blotting cannot accurately size or resolve the genomic structure of the ATXN10 repeat. In this talk, Dr. Birgitt Schuele elaborates that CRISPR-Cas9 enrichment/single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing technology and optical mapping now allow for accurate sizing of the repeat expansion, repeat composition, and can resolve somatic mosaicism, which are critical…

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Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Altered Alternative Splicing Process in FMR1 Premutation Carriers

In this talk, Dr. Flora Tassone focuses on the identification of alternative splicing isoforms at the FMR1 locus (both sense and antisense direction) in individual carriers of the FMR1 premutation allele, using the SMRT Sequencing approach. The characterization of a transcriptional profile could help to define a biomarker for monitoring disease progression and development.

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Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Uncovering Neurological Disorders Through an Examination of VNTRs

Many neurological diseases result from expansion of unstable variable nucleotide tandem repeats (VNTRs) that influence gene transcription of neighboring genes. In this talk, Dr. Henne Holstege presents research that investigated VNTRs across several genomes including a 115-year-old cognitively healthy individual. She and her group found that the genes that contained most VNTRs, of which PTPRN2 and DLGAP2 are the most prominent examples, were found to be predominantly expressed in the brain and associated with a wide variety of neurological disorders.

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Friday, June 4, 2021

Advancing Pharmacogenomics Research and the Need for Highly Accurate Long-Read Sequencing

Through Pharmacogenomics (PGx), we can explore how a person’s genome affects their response to drugs to enable the development of safe and effective medications tailored to their genetic makeup. In this talk, you’ll learn how PacBio HiFi sequencing: is cost-effective and highly accurate; enables comprehensive interrogation of pharmacogenomics genes—detecting all types of variants even in challenging regions; allows for the sequencing of pharmacogenomics genes as single-gene assays or large panels; produces data that is highly concordant with other technologies—adding value through comprehensive variant detection, copy number assessment, and phasing.

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Tuesday, June 1, 2021

The role of androgen receptor variant AR-V9 in prostate cancer

The expression of androgen receptor (AR) variants is a frequent, yet poorly-understood mechanism of clinical resistance to AR-targeted therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Among the multiple AR variants expressed in CRPC, AR-V7 is considered the most clinically-relevant AR variant due to broad expression in CRPC, correlations of AR-V7 expression with clinical resistance, and growth inhibition when AR-V7 is knocked down in CRPC models. Therefore, efforts are under way to develop strategies for monitoring and inhibiting AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The aim of this study was to understand whether other AR variants are co-expressed with AR-V7 and promote…

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Tuesday, June 1, 2021

High-throughput SMRT Sequencing of clinically relevant targets

Targeted sequencing with Sanger as well as short read based high throughput sequencing methods is standard practice in clinical genetic testing. However, many applications beyond SNP detection have remained somewhat obstructed due to technological challenges. With the advent of long reads and high consensus accuracy, SMRT Sequencing overcomes many of the technical hurdles faced by Sanger and NGS approaches, opening a broad range of untapped clinical sequencing opportunities. Flexible multiplexing options, highly adaptable sample preparation method and newly improved two well-developed analysis methods that generate highly-accurate sequencing results, make SMRT Sequencing an adept method for clinical grade targeted sequencing. The…

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Tuesday, June 1, 2021

A simple segue from Sanger to high-throughput SMRT Sequencing with a M13 barcoding system

High-throughput NGS methods are increasingly utilized in the clinical genomics market. However, short-read sequencing data continues to remain challenged by mapping inaccuracies in low complexity regions or regions of high homology and may not provide adequate coverage within GC-rich regions of the genome. Thus, the use of Sanger sequencing remains popular in many clinical sequencing labs as the gold standard approach for orthogonal validation of variants and to interrogate missed regions poorly covered by second-generation sequencing. The use of Sanger sequencing can be less than ideal, as it can be costly for high volume assays and projects. Additionally, Sanger sequencing…

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Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Comprehensive variant detection in a human genome with PacBio high-fidelity reads

Human genomic variations range in size from single nucleotide substitutions to large chromosomal rearrangements. Sequencing technologies tend to be optimized for detecting particular variant types and sizes. Short reads excel at detecting SNVs and small indels, while long or linked reads are typically used to detect larger structural variants or phase distant loci. Long reads are more easily mapped to repetitive regions, but tend to have lower per-base accuracy, making it difficult to call short variants. The PacBio Sequel System produces two main data types: long continuous reads (up to 100 kbp), generated by single passes over a long template,…

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Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Comprehensive variant detection in a human genome with highly accurate long reads

Introduction: Long-read sequencing has been applied successfully to assemble genomes and detect structural variants. However, due to high raw-read error rates (10-15%), it has remained difficult to call small variants from long reads. Recent improvements in library preparation and sequencing chemistry have increased length, accuracy, and throughput of PacBio circular consensus sequencing (CCS) reads, resulting in 10-20kb reads with average read quality above 99%. Materials and Methods: We sequenced a 12kb library from human reference sample HG002 to 18-fold coverage on the PacBio Sequel II System with three SMRT Cells 8M. The CCS algorithm was used to generate highly-accurate (average…

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Friday, February 5, 2021

Podcast: Exploring the exome and the future of genomics with Jay Shendure

Jay Shendure, a Professor in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine explores the role of exome sequencing in clinical genomics. In this Podcast he discusses his views on the current and future roles of sequencing in diagnosing Mendelian disorders and investigation of complex regions of the genome.

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Friday, February 5, 2021

Podcast: Huh? 30 million Americans have a rare disease? Howard Jacob on the state of clinical sequencing

Howard Jacob, Chief Genomics Officer at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, explored the role of genomics in diagnosing rare diseases. In this podcast he shared his views on the economics of clinical sequencing and how long-read sequencing is advancing the ability to sequence an individual’s genome –de novo– and use structural variant calling to make clinical diagnoses. He concluded with the hurdles limiting adoption of clinical sequencing and his vision for the future of genomic medicine.

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Friday, February 5, 2021

Webinar: Addressing “NGS Dead Zones” with third generation PacBio sequencing

SMRT Sequencing is a DNA sequencing technology characterized by long read lengths and high consensus accuracy, regardless of the sequence complexity or GC content of the DNA sample. These characteristics can be harnessed to address medically relevant genes, mRNA transcripts, and other genomic features that are otherwise difficult or impossible to resolve. I will describe examples for such new clinical research in diverse areas, including full-length gene sequencing with allelic haplotype phasing, gene/pseudogene discrimination, sequencing extreme DNA contexts, high-resolution pharmacogenomics, biomarker discovery, structural variant resolution, full-length mRNA isoform cataloging, and direct methylation detection.

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Friday, February 5, 2021

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Amplicon SMRT Sequencing applications in human genetics

In this ASHG workshop presentation, Stuart Scott of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, presented on using the PacBio system for amplicon sequencing in pharmacogenomics and clinical genomics workflows. Accurate, phased amplicon sequence for the CYP2D6 gene, for example, has allowed his team to reclassify up to 20% of samples, providing data that’s critical for drug metabolism and dosing. In clinical genomics, Scott presented several case studies illustrating the utility of highly accurate, long-read sequencing for assessing copy number variants and for confirming a suspected medical diagnosis in rare disease patients. He noted that the latest Sequel System…

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Friday, February 5, 2021

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Latest product and application updates

In this ASHG 2020 PacBio Workshop Jonas Korlach, CSO, shares how the new PacBio Sequel IIe System makes highly accurate long-read sequencing easy and affordable so?all scientists can gain comprehensive views of human genomes and transcriptomes. He goes on to provide updates on the applications including human WGS for variant detection, de novo genome assembly, single-cell full-length RNA sequencing, and targeted sequencing using PCR and No-Amp methods.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Single-Molecule Sequencing: Towards Clinical Applications.

In the past several years, single-molecule sequencing platforms, such as those by Pacific Biosciences and Oxford Nanopore Technologies, have become available to researchers and are currently being tested for clinical applications. They offer exceptionally long reads that permit direct sequencing through regions of the genome inaccessible or difficult to analyze by short-read platforms. This includes disease-causing long repetitive elements, extreme GC content regions, and complex gene loci. Similarly, these platforms enable structural variation characterization at previously unparalleled resolution and direct detection of epigenetic marks in native DNA. Here, we review how these technologies are opening up new clinical avenues that…

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